Skip to main content

Full text of "Jeweler’s Circular and Horological Review, 1901, Vol. 42 (Part 1)"

See other formats








Digitized by the Internet Archive 
in 2016 


https://archive.org/details/jewelerscircular00unse_63 






^ESTABLISHED 1869 


INDEX TO ADVERTISEMENTS, PAGE 62. 


I L - 




'^.Jewelers’ 

Circular 


AND MOROL.O GIGAL, REVIEW. 


and 


THE 





Copyrighted 1900 by 
The Jewelers’ Circular Pub. Co. 


Corbin Building, 11 John St., Corner Broadway, New York. York^N!^ 


32d Year. 


NEW YORK, WEDNESDAY, FEBRUARY 6, 1901. 


VoL. XLII. No. 1. 


THE MASTERCR AETSMAN OE THE JEWELERS AND SILVERSIVIITHS. 


A LITTLE over 400 years ago — on the 
3d of November, 1500 — a boy was 
born to John Cellini, musician and archi- 
t e c t, at Florence. 

“Let him be wel- 
come,” his father ex- 
claimed when he re- 
ceived the h a p p V 
tidings, and thus 
“Welcome” (Italian, 

“Benvenuto”) be- 
came the child’s 
name. At a very 
early age the boy 
evinced great inclina- 
tion for drawing and 
molding, and, con- 
trary to the desire of 
his father, who fain 
would have him be- 
come a musician, he 
entered a goldsmith’s 
shop as an appren- 
tice. But to please 
his father as well, he 
learned to play upon 
the flute besides. 

When 15 years of 
age he was banished, 
together with his 
brother, for six 
months .. om the city 
of his birth as a 
punishment for a 
brawl in which they 
became involved. 

This violent and un- 
r u 1 y tendency ac- 
companied him a 1 1 
through life, c o n - 
stantly getting him 
into trouble and dis- 
tress. At the age of 
19 years he went to 
Rome without the 
knowledge of his parents, worked there 
for a time and then returned to Florence. 
In 1523, Benvenuto was^ compelled to 


leave his home a second time on account 
of an evil deed, getting away disguised in 
ecclesiastical garb. He took permanent 


sojourn at Rome, entering the service of 
Pope Clement VII. as a goldsmith as well 
as a musician of the Papal orchestra. Ves- 


sels and trinkets, medals and seals were 
the fruits of his labors in this period. His 
liking for combat and danger was fully 
gratified when, in 
1527, the Imperial 
army, under Charles 
of Bourbon, marched 
o n Rome. Benve- 
nuto just happened 
to be on the walls 
when the Imperial 
troops entered the 
city. By a lucky 
shot he succeeded in 
killing the leader of 
the hostile arm y. 
Next he fled to the 
Angel’s castle and 
assisted in its defense, 
taking charge of a 
cannon. In the great- 
est distress the Pope 
decided to melt down 
his treasures to pro- 
tect them from the 
covetousness of his 
adversaries. He con- 
ferred this task upon 
Cellini, who took the 
precious stones and 
pearls from the 
tiaras and other 
pieces and melted 
down the golden set- 
tings. The gems, 
etc., were sewed into 
the vestments of the 
Pope and other dig- 
nitaries. Unfortun- 
ately, Cellini could 
not resist the tempta- 
tion of keeping a por- 
tion of the gold him- 
self. 

After Rome became 
ree, Cellini went for some time to Mantua 
and Florence. At the breaking out of 
hostilities between his native town and the 




THE JEWELERS’ CIRCULAR-WEEKLY. 


February 6, 1901. 




You Know What You Have 

when you receive Goods. 

' TTUOEMARK ^ 

REGISTERED 

A Watch Chain made of Heavy Gold Plate, Positively Guaranteed 

bv a Responsible House, is a proper companion to a Good Watch; so also is 

a First-class Locket. 

Thousands upon Thousands of our Chains and Lockets 

have been in constant wear for fully Ten Years, attesting the value of our broad 
guarantee. 

Buy F&B Chains and Lockets and guarantee them for Ten Years and we 
will back that guarantee. 

See our Bracelets and Sleeve Buttons. We state positively that we 
have the finest lines to be found in this or any other country. 


Theodore W. Foster & Bro. Co., 


Successors to 

FOSTER & BAILEY. 


100 Richmond Street, Providence, R. I. 








OUR 5 TRAVELERS 


will call on the 


OUR REPRESENTATIVES: 

JUl/i/S KLEIN, South; 

TRAUB, East; 

T. LINDENBER6, 

West; 


Jewelry Trade 


regularly 
throughout 
the season. 


Special 
facilities 
for promptly 
filling DIRECT ORDERS. 


S. S. SCHWARZ, 

Far West and 

Pacific Coast; 

MAX GUNZBURGER, 

Middle States. 


OUR SALESMEN 
CARRY A 

NEW AND COMPLETE 
LINE OF GOODS. 


It will be to your interest to 

WAIT FOR THEM. 


HENRY REINEWALD, 

FineWatch Repairing 

TO THE TRADE, 

14 Maiden Lane, - New York. 


SKILLFUL REPAIRER. 

All kinds of jewelry repairing for the trade 
at satisfactory prices. 

New mountings, resetting, also new order work 
promptly attended to. A specialty made of Badges, 
Medals, etc. Twenty-five years’ experience. 

C. PONZONI, 16 Maiden Lane, NewVork. 


Horological Department, 

BRADLEY POLYTECHNIC INSTITUTE, 

PEORIA, ILLINOIS. 

Largest and Best Watch School in America. 

We teach Watch Work, Jewelry, Engraving, Clock Work, 
Optics. (Formerly Parsons’ Horological Institnte.) 

Tuition reasonable. Board and rooms near school at moder- 
ate rates. fv>r Oataloirue of InforTnatlon,/ 

KENT & WOODLAND, 

SUCCESSORS TO 

WM. H. BALL & CO., 

GOLD BRACELETS 

16 John Street, New York. 


FRESH WATER PEARLS 

BOUGHT AXD SOUD. 

Also PEARLS POLISHED 

and all possible improvements made. 
Pearls damaged by setting restored. 

JOHN HAACK, 5^,“j"hn^st..New York. 

Office Hours : 1 to a 




February 6, 1901. 


THE JEWELERS’ CIRCULAR-WEEKLY. 


3 


! 


•w s 


The 20th Century Service. 


At the threshold of this 20th century we stand ready to 
render you such service as will be in keeping with the firm 
step forward that has been taken in every line of business. 

Our record of the past need not be forgiven; you know 
it. We look back upon it with pardonable pride and feel 
sure that you will coincide with us that we are justified 
in doing so. 

Progress, with all that the word implies, is our watch- 
word for the 20th century. This applies to every detail of 
our business — stock, facilities and help — all of which com- 
bine in enabling us to render you such service as will 
bring prosperity to us both. 

We solicit the opportunity to render you this service, 
assuring you that every detail of it will be extended for 
the furtherance of your interests, as your interests are 
also ours. 


L. C. REISNER & CO., 

: 

i Importers, Exporters, Manufacturers and Jobbers, 

! Watchmakers’ Tools, Material and Supplies, 

i II W. Chestnut St., Lancaster, Pa. Ill S. Eighth St., Phila., Pa. 


t 

I 
I 

t 

♦ 

X 

♦ 
♦ 
♦ 
♦ 

: 

♦ 
♦ 
♦ 
♦ 
♦ 
♦ 
♦ 
♦ 
♦ 

: 
I 

X 

♦ 
♦ 
♦ 

X 

X 

♦ 
♦ 
♦ 
♦ 
♦ 

. X 

I ♦ 


X 

♦ 

♦ 


♦ 
♦ 

II 

• ♦ 
• ♦ 
• ♦ 


}l 


: 

♦ 

♦ 

♦ 

♦ 

♦ 

♦ 

♦ 

♦ 

♦ 

♦ 

♦ 

♦ 

♦ 

♦ 






X 


THE JEWELERS’ CIRCULAR-WEEKLY. 


February 6, 1901. 



iamonds. 


In the rough diamond market (London) the 
uncut diamonds are graded as follows: 

BLUES . — First grade called Jaegers. 

Second grade called [Vessel ton. 

These are fancy stones, cost very high, and comparatively few 
are sold. 

WHITE . — First grade called Crystals, the finest white. 

Second grade called Silver Cape; are “very fine white color.” 
Third grade called Fine Cape, from which we cut the diamonds 
we call Fine Commercial White. 

Fourth grade called Cape; runs on the yellow shade and is 
lower grade than we find sale for. 

Still lower grades of rough stones are called Eyewater, Off Color, etc. 


IVe have just cut up a lot of Silver Cape rough stones, which 
are very fine white ami next to the finest grade of white. 

These diamonds are finest American cut, round, brilliant 
and well spread. 

IVe can sell the perfect diamonds from this lot at following 
list prices and subject to our regular book discount : 

% Carat Diamonds for $148.00 per Carat List. 

% Carat Diamonds for $170.00 per Carat List. 

1 Carat Diamonds for $186.00 per Carat List. 

The imperfects at much lower prices. 

YOU CANNOT MATCH THESE DIAMONDS ANY= 
WHERE ELSE AT NEAR THESE PRICES. 

lye name these prices as samples only. They are taken from 
our regular line. All our prices are equallv low. See our book 
for full line. 


Plain Solid Gold Rings, Children’s Rings, 
Engraved Rings, Mountings, 

Ladies’ Stone Rings, Chains. 

Diamond Cutters. 

J. R. WOOD & SONS, 

21 p/laiden Lane, 

NEIV YORK. 


February 6, 1901. 


THE JEWELERS’ CIRCULAR-WEEKLY. 


5 


The Giant of 

Collar Buttons 


HOW TO AVOID IMITATIONS 



The Krement^ One-Piece Rolled Gold Plated Collar Button is 
always sold on a card like this : 


Warranted Uk Gold Plate, 


THE 

X- Pat. 
May 6, *84» 


Warranted 14k Gold Plate, 



"©neslptece.” 


COPVKIGnf. 


FRONT OF CARD, printed in light green ink. 


The Krementz One-Piece Gold Collar 
Button is always sold on a card like this: 

SOLID GOLD. 

THE “KREMENTZ.” ONE .PIECE. 


Made by Krementz & Co. 
Pat. May 6, t884. . 



FRONT OF CARD. 


BACK OF CARD, printed in light green ink. 

Facsimile of front and back of cards used for Rolled Gold Plated Krementz One-Piece 

Collar Buttons. 


GUARANTEE. 

Starting with aflat piece of metal. THE KREMENTZ collar 
button is made without Joint or solder. It cannot break. If from 
ANY CAUSE one should he damaned either zn thehands of the 




THE 

WE// 




“®nd=iIMece.” 

dealer or consumer a new button will be given in exchange, 
liabel copyright 1809. 

KREMENTZ !f CO., 

Newark, N. J, 


BACK OF CARD, printed in light green ink. 


We receive many imitations of the Krementz One-Piece Collar Buttons for exchange under our 
guarantees, showing that dealers are frequently deceived in purchasing the former. 

Note our copyright labels as above printed in light green ink. 

Patent sustained by 
United States Supreme Court. 

QUALITY AXD CONSXItUCXIOlV HAYE MADE OUK. R.EPUTAXI01V. 

KREMENTZ & CO., 49 chestnut street, 

PARKS BROS. & ROGERS, 20 Maiden Lane, New York. NEWARK N. J. 

Selling Agents to Jobbing Trade. ^ 

Write for our booklet; “The Story of a Collar Button, with Illustrations.” 



February 6, 1901. 


THE JEWELERS’ CIRCULAR-WEEKLY. 



IRVING 


A pattern with 
simple decora= 
tions and grace= 
ful outline, is 
offered for pur= 
chasers of crit= 
ical taste. 

This pattern is 
made complete, 
including table 
cutlery. 

All pieces are 
of medium 
weight and well 
balanced. Fin= 
ished in French 
Gray and bur= 
nished bright. 

Illustrations not 
full size. 


WALLINGFORD, CONN 

226 FIFTH AVE., NEW YORK. 
1 131*137 WARREN ST,CHICAGO.i 
120 SUTTER ST. SAN FRANCCO.CAL. > 
L&3 BASING HALL ST. LONDON, EN^ 




February 6, 1901. 


THE JEWELERS’ CIRCULAR-WEEKLY. 


7 


Pope, he was called back by the latter/ 
receiving' lull pardon for the embezzlement 
of the gold, to which he pleaded guilty, and 
received the post of stamp master at the 
Papistical mint. On the occasion of an- 
other misdeed he was also shown mercy 
by Clement VII. When Benvenuto’s 
brother was killed in a quarrel he took re- 
venge on the murderer by plunging a dag- 
ger into his neck from behind. The Pope, 
as related by Benvenuto, punished him only 
with a fierce side-glance. Paul III., the 
successor of Clement VII., also granted 
Cellini his favor. For the assassination of 
Pompeo, a goldsmith of Milan, whom Cel- 
lini struck down in the street in the midst 
of his companions, the bold malcreant was 
given a safe-conduct. 

Among the numerous works which the 
artist created for Paul III., especially note- 
worthy was the golden cover of a breviary, 
which Cellini was allowed to hand in per- 
son to Charles V. as a present of the Pope, 
when that potentate came to Rome on the 
occasion of his expedition against Tunis. 
The many enemies, however, whom Cel- 
lini had made by his violent manner gave 
him no rest. When matters became too 
troublesome for him he went to France, 
but returned soon, as Francis I., taken up 
by wars, had no use for the arts of peace. 
Scarcely returned to Rome, he was thrown 
into prison on the charge of having stolen 
jewels from the church at the investment 
of the Angel’s castle. By the exertion of 
.all his powers, he succeeded in escaping 
in an adventurous manner, but soon after 
was placed under more severe arrest, from 


which he was liberated only by the inter- 
vention of Francis I., who wanted to draw 
him to Paris. 

New tasks awaited him in France. While 
so far he had been active only in the field 
of the small arts as a goldsmith, he now 
tried his luck successfully in the plastic 
art on a large scale. In this respect his 
second trip to France marked an import- 
ant turning point in his life. He cast the 
large bronze-relief of the nymph of Fon- 
tainebleau, which is now in the Louvre at 
Paris, and worked on the colossal statue 
of Mars, whose head was so large as to 
accommodate a dulcinea of one of his 
assistants, who hid her there for a time. 
He returned, in 1545, to Florence, remain- 
ing there the remaining 26 years of his life. 
The Duke of Tuscany, Cosimo L, received 
him with open arms. The chief work of 
his life, the “Perseus,” was then created, 
the casting of which he accomplished with 
great difficulties. When the work was un- 
veiled there was a general enthusiasm. 
Hundreds of sonnets eulogizing him and 
his monument were fastened to his door, 
after the fashion of that period. Of his 
numerous other creations, the following 
still exist: the bronze busts of the duke 
and of Bindo Altoisti. His last large work 
was a life size Christ on the Cross, of. 
marble, which is now in the Escurial at 
Madrid. A queer fact in his life is that, 
in 1558, he entered the clergy. Two years 
later he was again released from his vows, 
and married a short time afterward his 
housekeeper, Piera di Parigi, with whom 
he had already had two children. No 


friendly star ruled over his last years on 
earth. Penury and sickness were his last 
companions, until he departed this life in 
1571. 

These are, in brief, the events forming 
his career, in which the good and the evil 
were most strangely intermixed. His 
character was the outcome of the times in 
which he lived, when brutal force alone 
was the law. His importance as sculptor 
can be readily judged from the works pre- 
served, but it is more difficult to do justice 
to his abilityas a goldsmith. Of the fewau- 
thentic pieces of goldsmithing of his work 
extant, the well known salt cellar does not 
reflect the greatest credit upon him. 
The two chief figures are not at all pro- 
portionate in size to the remaining ac- 
cessories; their position is outright' un- 
natural. Perfect, however, is the technical 
workmanship. Both figures are chased, 
colored enamel alternating with bright 
gold. The artist himself instructs us re- 
garding the idea underlying the whole 
composition. The two main figures rep- 
resent the Earth, the producer of the 
spices, and the salt-purveying sea is* em- 
bodied in the image of Neptune. They are 
seated opposite each other, with their legs 
interlaced, “as we observe in the case of 
firths and promontories.” The Earth is 
seated on the head of an elephant, over 
whom a green enameled cover is spread. 
Beside her appears a dog, a lion and a 
salamander, the heraldic animal of Francis 
I. The pepper receptacle, standing upon 
the gaily enameled soil, has the shape of a 
triumphal arch or a temple. On the lid re- 





N. H. WHITE & CO. 


invite the attention of 
the trade to their 



DIAMOND STOCK, 


Mounted and Unmounted. 

MEMO. ORDERS SPECIALLY SOLICITED. 

They continue to be 

HEADQUARTERS tor AMERICAN WATCHES. 


1 


21 Maiden Lane^ New York 


THE JEWELERS’ CIRCULAR-WEEKLY. 


February G, 1901. 




February 6, 1901. 


THE JEWELERS’ CIRCULAR-WEEKLY. 


9 



poses a female form, while smaller figures 
adorn the edges. Neptune is enthroned 
on a shell. In the blue waves of the 
sea, in which sea-horses and dolphins 
disport themselves, floats a richly dec- 
orated bark, which holds the salt. The 
recess of the base of ebony is adorned 
by the personifications of the winds and 
times of the day, the latter much influenced 
by the sculptures of the Medicean graves 
by Michel Angelo, for whom Cellini al- 
ways entertained great admiration. The 
artist finished the salt cellar for Francis I. 
in 1543. He received 1,000 
gold ducats for its produc- 
tion. It has been found 
that the weight of the piece 
corresponds almost ex- 
actly to this quantity of 
gold. In 1570, Charles IX. 
of France presented the 
salt cellar to the Archduke 
Ferdinand of Austria, who 
had represented him at the 
wedding of Elizabeth of 
Austria to the French king 
at Speyer. From the cas- 
tle Ambras, in Tyrol, it 
went, in 1806, with other 
valuables, to Vienna, where 
it is now kept in the “Hof- 
museum.” 

Further details regard- 
ing similar goldsmith’s 
works by Cellini are fur- 
nished by the marble 
base of the Perseus, 
whose rich decoration 
is placed to the ac- 
count of Cellini, the “gold- 
smith,” and perhaps the 
bust of Duke Cosimo, at 
the National Museum in 
Florence. Tire fantastic 
ornaments of the coat-of- 
mail also give one an ap- 
proximate conception of 
what many of the orna- 
ments mentioned in his 
writings may have looked 
like. 

The real fame of Cellini 
as a goldsmith is based 
less upon his works than 
on his autobiography, 
which Goethe’s masterly 
translation into German* 
has rendered accessible to 
the widest circles. It has 
glorified his name to 
such a degree that for a 
long time almost every good piece of gold- 
smithing from the 16th century was at- 
tributed to him. Less known are his es- 
says on goldsmithing and sculpture (trans- 
lated into German by Justus Brinckmannj, 
which contain interesting information re- 
specting the working methods of that 
epoch. Although the name of Cellini has, 
during the last decades, been partly divested 
of the fame which he has showered upon 
himself most generously, he has in a cer- 
tain way maintained his position as the 
foremost representative of the art of gold- 
smithing in olden times, since he is one of 

*CelIini’s autobiography has also been translated 
into French by Leopold Leclanche, and into En 
lish by Nugent, Roscoe and Symonds. 


Tbe Old ClocR on tbe Stairs. 


■^^WHERE can you find a child who has 
^ » not read and, perhaps, committed 
to memory that beautiful and famous lit- 
tle poem of Longfellow’s which has for 
its theme the significant refrain of “For- 
ever — never! Never — forever!” That 
little poem which is so full of pathos, and 
not only recalls the past but looks with 
something like longing toward the fu- 
ture. In its' lines one can see the beauti- 
ful nature of the writer, a 
nature which everybody 
loved and one which was 
full of sympathy for all 
mankind. 

Everybody who reads at 
all loves the memory of 
the author of the above 
named poem and there are 
none who love that mem- 
ory more than the students 
of Bowdoin College, from 
which Longfellow was a 
graduate in the class of 
1825 with Hawthorne and 
other famous men. All 
about Bowdoin there are 
trees named for Longfel- 
low and places which are 
always pointed out to the 
visitor as being associated 
in some way with the 
name of the great poet. 

In one old house not far 
from the campus there 
stands on the stairs an an- 
cient timepiece, a time- 
piece which answers 
closely the description of 
the old clock on the stairs 
in the poem. This clock 
is said to be over 100 
years old, and to look at 
it nobody would doubt it. 
The woman who owns it 
takes great delight in say- 
ing that that is the old clock 
of which Longfellow wrote, 
and through all the years 
that the clock has been in 
her possession it has been 
preserved sacred as the or- 
iginal of the “Old Clock 
on the Stairs.” 

From the fact that the 
lady has been so persistent 
in her claim in regard to 
this clock, many of the 
I students have come to look upon it in the 
same light, and the feeling has grown so 
much through the long years that it has 
stood there, that this old clock on the 
stairs in Brunswick -is now pointed out 
to visitors to the old house as the clock 
of the poem. In spite of the fact that stu- 
dents and faculty would be glad to believe 
this, if such a thing were possible, any- 
body who has looked carefully into the 
description of the house and the clock as 
related in the poem, and who has studied 
the history of the poem itself will see that 
the surroundings of the clock in Bruns- 
wick do not coincide with the surround- 
ings of the clock in the poem. 

.According to the history of the poem 


the few who possessed with the greatest 
skill of the artisan the qualities of a crea- 
tive artist. He is still a vivid example oi 
the old intimate connection of art and 
tradesmanship. Besides, he is the only one 
of the old masters whose powerful person- 
ality stands distinctly and clearly before us. 
It is owing to this fact that the 400th anni- 
versary of his birth has been celebrated by 
ihe craft in all parts of the civilized world. 


Two beautiful and costly silver vases, 
which formerly belonged to a relative of 


BUST OF COSIMO DE MEDICI, BY CELLINI. 

IN THE PALAZZO DE BARGELLO, FLORENCE. 

Emperor Constantine the Great, were un- 
earthed a few weeks ago near the town of 
Nisch, in Servia, which is chiefly memor- 
able as having been Constantine’s birth- 
place. Of their real value the finder had 
not the faintest conception, but he knew 
that they were worth money, so he took 
one to a goldsmith in Nisch, who bought 
it, and being as ignorant of its real value 
as the peasant, melted it in a day or two. 
Fortunately, the second vase came by 
chance into the possession of Tschachotis, 
who is the Russian Consul at Nisch and 
a well known antiquarian and numismatist, 
and he at once saw that he had acquired a 
relic of surpassing interest. It did not 
take him long to decipher the inscription. 


10 


THE JEWELERS’ CIRCULAR-WEEKLY. 


February 6 , 1901. 


CHESTER BILLINGS £ 

SUCCESSORS TO RANDEL, BAREMORE 

# SOK 

& BILLINGS 

1840 

Randel Sc Baremore 
1S66 

Randel, Baremore & Co. 
1880 

Randel, Baremore & 
Billings 

IMPORTERS OF 

DIAMONDS 

OTHER PRECIOUS STONES AND PEARLS 

p DIAMOND 

jewelry 

New York 
58 Nassau Street 
29 Maiden Lane 

¥ 

London, E. C, 

22 Holborn Viaduct 


MAKERS OF luK. DIAMOND JEWELRY. 

Kinfis and Pendants Oar Specialty. 

37 & 39 Maiden Lare, 

Fttotor,. \f\liJ YORK 

•- 40 Muldtii I.BIIC. nLIl luitn 

Selection packages sent to 
responsible jewelers. 


DAY, 

CLARK & CO., 


MAKERS OB' 


Kine Jewelry, 

14 K. ONLY. 

CT=0 

T rade-'Marlc. 

33 Maiden Eane, 

New York. 


the clock referred to stood in an old house 
in Pittsfield, Mass., known as the “Plun- 
kett” house, and was owned Mrs. Long- 
fellow’s maternal grandfather. It was in 
this house that Longfellow was married, 
a fact which is beautifully brought out in 
the poem. But in spite of this there are 
many points of resemblance between the 
house and clock in the poem and those in 
Brunswick. The poem speaks of the 
porch across which “Poplar trees their 
shadows throw.” This answers the de- 
scription of the house in Brunswick. 
"Half way up the stairs it stands,” says 
the poem, and the same is true of the 
clock in Brunswick. But the one thing 
more than all others which might seem 
to refer to the Brunswick clock is that 
part of the poem which tells of the part- 
ings. 

“All are scattered now and fled, 

Some are married, some are dead; 

And when I ask with throbs of pain, 

‘Ah, when shall they all meet again?’ 

As in the days long since gone by, 

The ancient timepiece makes reply — 
‘Forever — never! 

Never — forever!’ ” 

This stanza might easily be applied to 
the parting of his classmates in college 
and, very likely, it may be so, as the 
stanza seems to point to young people, 
since it says that “some are married.” 
As the old clock in Brunswick was there 
on the stairs when Longfellow was in 
college he must have seen it many times, 
and whether or not this is the clock in 
the poem it is far from impossible that he 
might have gained some inspiration from 
it and have had it in mind when he wrote 
the lines which seem to fit so admirably 
the scattering of his class. At any rate 
the poem is beautiful and there is no par- 
ticular harm in the belief of the students 
that they live near the old clock of which 
one of their most famous graduates 
wrote. 

Ivan Kvrovitch. 




DIAMOND CUTTING. 

Since i88o we have cut and repaired 
diamonds for the American trade, giving 
only the finest work at the lowest price. 

MENDES CUTTING FACTORIES, 

12-16 JOHN STREET, NEW YORK. 


M ore Trouble for Promoters of » Ton- 
tine Diamond Enterprise. 

Ionia, Mich., Jan. 26. — A week ago the 
officers and stockholders of the Michigan 
Tontine Investment Co. (diamond deal- 
ers) were arrested on a capias at the in- 
stance of Charles M. Northrop, of Lake- 
view, and bonds were fixed at $300 each. 
They refused to furnish bonds and the 
Sheriff took them into custody but did not 
lock them up as all are prominent profes- 
sional business men of this city. He gave 
them the jail limit. 

The capias, returnable on Feb. 5, alleges 
fraud and misrepresentation in procuring 
certificates and is against Fred. Cutler, 
Jr,, Charles P. Locke, W. C. Snell, J. H. 
Fox, Willis S. Peck, H. Horrigan, J. B. 
Chaddock and A. E. Kelly. The claimant, 
Northrup, paid for one week’s board and 
the time expired on Friday. He refused ro 
pay further because the Sheriff had not 
confined the prisoners to the county jail, 
and they are again practically free. The 
amount of Northrup’s claim is $164 and he 
threatens to make an attempt to collect it 
from the Sheriff. 


George Lawrence has opened a watch 
repairing business in Quincy. 111. 



February 6, 1901. 


THE JEWELERS’ CIRCULAR-WEEKLY. 


11 


The T wentieth Century 

Starts 



with claims of perfection in many 
things. 

We claim that perfection in a shirt 
stud is to be found only in 

^he Larter Stud, 


for the following reasons: 



FIRST — It can be used in either 
buttonhole, eyelethole or a com= 
bination of the two, thus fitting 
any style shirt. 

SECOND — Very easy to insert with= 
out soiling shirt bosom. 

THIRD — No annoyance of working 
out or fear of loss. 



Patented Dec. 18, 1900. 


FOURTH — Very easy to remove from 
shirt, with nothing to come apart 
and lose. 

FIFTH — Made in the greatest variety 
of patterns in 
18k. gold, 

14k. gold, 

10k. gold and 

Extra quality 14k. plate. 


A COMPLETE STOCK OF 
A PERFECT SHIRT STUD. 


LARTER, E.LCOX 6 CO., 

21 6 23 Maiden Lane, = = NEW YORK. 



12 


February G, lUbl. 


THE JEWELERS’ CIRCULAR-WEEKLY. 





A. WITTNAIER, 

MANUFACTURER AND SOLE IMPORTER OF 

THE CELEBRATED 


Agassiz and Longines Watches, 


GILL BUILDING, 


t Grand Prize, 

i PARIS, 1889. 


Gold Medal, 

PARIS, 1878. 


Grand Prize, 

PARIS, 1900. 


Grand Prize, 

BRUSSELS, 1897. 


No. 9 MAIDEN LANE, NEW YORK. i 

i 


February 6, 1901. 


THE JEWELERS’ CIRCULAR-WEEKLY. 


Cbe Cove for Jewelry. 


A REVIEW OF THE FASHIONS OF THE PAST 
YEAR AND A LOOK INTO THE FUTURE. 


BY ELSIE BEE. 

T he splendor of the 20th century which 
is now upon us is nowhere more 
marked than in the realm of the jewelers 
and goldsmiths. Their ancient and hon- 
orable crafts have developed in the attempt 
to satisfy one of the primeval and inherent 
instincts of mankind, the love of beauty — 
a love which is so enduring in its nature 
that one of the world’s great religions 
typifies the environment of its paradise of 
eternity by walls of precious stones, gates 
of pearl and streets of gold. The instinct 
for beauty and for the adornment of the 
person stirred in the breasts of those first 
human beings whom the mists of accumu- 
lated ages have swallowed up and of whom 
we know only what the archaeologists dis- 
cover by the excavation of ruins and un- 
sealing of tombs wherein they find the rude 
yet often essentially excellent ornaments 
of the times. 

As has been aptly said, “Whatever builds 
upon the sure foundation of the needs, de- 
sires and tastes of the whole human race 
will always live.” If one were to enter 
into the subject of the evolution of jewelry 
the Bible would be found the best guide 
to its earliest historic stages. Jacob’s 
wooing of Rebecca with earrings of gold 
is a familiar tale; the chain was then, as 
indeed it still is, an emblem of dignity and 
honor; the ring, a token of love, affection, 
friendship, confidence. And as an instance 
of the theory that life moves in great re- 
curring cycles, that all which is has been 
and will be again, it is curious to note that 
probably no one of our articles of decora- 
tive jewelry to-day can claim absolute orig- 
inality. All have had their prototypes and 
in some form humanity has already used 
and delighted in them all — chains, rings, 
bracelets, brooches, etc. Even the pendant, 
which is very salient in to-day’s fashions, 
appears to have been a “fad,” if the word 
is here admissible, of the ancient Greeks 
who used it as a talisman and engraved it 
with scenes from the hunting fields and 
the sea, or with the heads of warrior he- 
roes of their race. 

It is not the object here to trace the 
long past, but to note briefly those modes 
which flourished during our last year and, 
being still full of vitality, have passed over 
the threshold into the fresh life of the new 
century. When 1900 was yet young, women 
had already realized that they might wear 
what they would, provided only it were 
beautiful; and, consequently, all through 
the fleeting days there has been a reaching 
out into untried paths, ‘a widening of the 
bounds, until a simple catalogue of the va- 
rious articles that may enter into the 
toilette would be imposing through its 
length alone. There are a few events of 
New York life which stand forth as guides 
on fashion’s roadway — the horse show in 
the Fall, the beginning of the opera in 
January and the Easter season. The first 
of these this year demonstrated unmistak- 
ably that “everything goes,” and for the 
very good reason that the jewelers and so- 
ciety being in perfect accord— one in heart 


and mind — as to the ethics and aesthetics 
of personal ornament, the former have put 
forth prodigious and untiring efforts in 
the development of a finer character in 
their art; with what success need not be 
said to those who have seen the wonderful 
exhibits of the Paris Exposition, or who 
note with attention the manifold attrac- 
tions of the shops and the delightful crea- 
tions which enhance the costume of well 
dressed men and women. Everywhere — 
at balls, dinners, weddings, receptions, in 
theater and church, in carriage, on ele- 
vated trains and cars — the flash of gems, 
the glow of gold, the luster of silver greet 



JEWELRY WORN’ WITH THE STREET 
COSTUME. 


the eye; and it is but simple justice to say 
that glaring exhibitions of bad taste in the 
use of such things grow ever rarer. Side 
by side, indeed almost with equal pace, 
have progressed the expansion of the jew- 
elers’ domain and the education of the 
public in the artistic employment of all 
the well conceived articles to which they 
give such ready welcome. Having elected 
to make herself radiant with the most 
artistic and becoming accessories that can 
be found, the American woman has been 
doing so with the cleverness, the keen' 
perception of that which is harmonious 
and fitting, for which the.world has learned 
to render her homage. 

Royalty and diamonds have ever been 
associated, and it is, therefore, not strange 
that in a country of uncrowned kings and 
queens this stone should lead all others. 
Referring to one of the social events al- 
ready alluded to, the opera, we find it 


this season a veritable “jewel song.” So 
tremendous is the display of dress, even 
greater than last year, in the parterre and 
grand tier boxes, that the ordinary spec- 
tator is likely to be as much enchanted 
with the fascinating drama of fashion and 
life there, which the haut monde enacts 
with consummate indifference to watching 
eyes, as with the divine strains that fill the 
ears. And first in this display must be 
mentioned the crowns, tiaras, aigrettes and 
other leading eoiffure ornaments. With 
grace that might have come down through 
a long line of royal blood are they worn, 
and the combined treasures of Solomon 
and the Queen of Sheba could hardly pro- 
duce anything to outrival the preciousness 
of some of them. The diamond reigns su- 
preme in these ornaments, yet in the mak- 
ing of not a few tiaras, the opaque color 
of the turquoise contrasts sharply with the 
glitter of the king of stones, or the velvety 
hue of the emerald mellows and enriches 
it. While tiara or diadem represents the 
important piece and demands a certain no- 
ble poi'se of the head, the light, dainty 
aigrette, with its jeweled ornament, is per- 
haps the most adaptable and becoming of 
the various hair accessories. The collars 
of diamonds or pearls, or the two gems in 
combination; the ropes of pearls, the great 
diamond sprays on the corsage, the cres- 
cents, the large diamond hair brooches 
stand out as commanding features in the 
great whole of richness and elegance at 
this grand function on those particular 
nights which the elegantes choose to make 
memorable. 

Taking its rise in Paris and familiar to 
alert jewelers and connoisseurs for some 
time, I’ art nouveau was, nevertheless, an 
unknown quantity to the rank and file un- 
til the past Summer. Now it is expressed, 
to some extent, in every grade of jewelry 
from highest to lowest. The comment has 
been made that this new phase of the craft 
appeals too entirely to a critical and highly 
educated mind; that its exploitation of ex- 
cellence in art renders it less suitable to 
the purposes of personal adornment than 
those styles to which we have been accus- 
tomed; that it is better adapted to the 
curio or art collection than to the jewel 
case. It can hardly be denied that a sun- 
burst of diamonds, a pearl or turquoise 
crescent, a glowing opal brooch with 
encadrement of dazzling brilliants is a more 
effective aid in building up a striking en- 
semble in dress than is an exquisite orna- 
ment of gold and enamels in some Egyp- 
tian motif, let us say of water, lotos and 
sacred bird, with jewels as simply a har- 
monious part of the design; for minute at- 
tention must be directed to every detail 
of such an article, in order worthily to ap- 
preciate its meaning and beauty. Yet the 
new art has gained instant approval and 
made itself felt not only in its own distinct 
aspect, but in its influence on existing 
styles. It delights the connoisseurs and 
may prove the leaven to further elevate 
jewelry designing. But the glory and 
beauty of gems pure and simple, with as 
little distraction as possible of mountings 
and adventitious ornament, vibrates a note 
that is very strong in the popular taste, 
and the “new art” and the old seem likely 
to run their course together. So decidedly 
elastic is the term “new art” and so com- 


14 


THE JEWELERS’ CIRCULAR-WEEKLY. 


prehensive its field, that it is difficult to 
compress a clear idea of it into a brief par- 
agraph. Its motifs, however, thus far. have 
been Egj’ptian, Greek, Roman and Celtic. 
It has employed gold and silver, enamels 
(both opaque and translucent) and gems, 
but these latter somewhat in subordination 
to their environment. We have had 
uouz'eau art necklaces, buckles, pendants, 
brooches and watch cases and some traces 
of it in rings. 

Among facts that seem to call for men- 
tion is the rise to familiarity, during the 
year, of turquoise matrix. Wherever the 
pure turquoise has been considered ap- 
propriate there may the matrix be intro- 
duced instead. Opal matrix, also, is not 
unknown. The popular affection for tur- 
quoise remains as strong as ever, and one 
reason for this may be the facility with 
which it harmonizes with all those dull 
shades of silver now so fashionable and 
with the various colors of gold which 
abound. But whether with or without rea- 
son, women, and men, also, cherish the tur- 
quoise, and the mysterious beauty of the 
opal casts its spell over countless hearts. 

The increasing prices or scarcity of dia- 
monds, fine rubies and emeralds may have 
something to do with the influx of less 
valuable stones which the past year has 
witnessed in common with a year or two 
preceding. The peridot, or evening emer- 
ald, of long ago has again made its pleas- 
ing green tint familiar. Montana sap- 
phires, deep blue and also fancy colored, 
have attained deserved fame. Mexican 
opals and turquoises, tourmalines, beryls, 
ruby-red garnets, yellow spessartite, col- 
ored fresh water pearls, moonstones, ame- 
thysts, topazes, chrysoprases, aquamarines, 
hyacinths or jargoons, as well as jade, 
lapis lazuli, agate, bloodstone, cornelian, 
coral, etc., etc., all share in the reign of 
color which obtains in the gems and sub- 
stances utilized by the jewelers. 

The beauty of baroque or irregularly 
shaped pearls has made itself widely felt; 
in fact, the spread of this fashion in the 
past year has been almost phenomenal. 
Especially do these pearls lend themselves 
to the requirements of the new art, or to 
a phase of art which seems destined to be 
intermediate between the purely new and 
the old. The fancy of the designer manip- 
ulates these gems of varied and fascinating 
outline in hundreds of ways, but it is, per- 
haps, principally in the brooch, pendant 
and pin that they appear. 

Cuttings, too, have been greatly varied 
during the year that is gone. Cabochons 
and round topped forms, even in rubies 
and emeralds, have found great favor. Dia- 
monds have been cut in heart, marquise 
and other unusual forms, and rose dia- 
monds are more in vogue. Emeralds 
drilled and threaded on wire hang as drops 
and pendants and many stones are utilized 
simply polished rather than cut. 

The different shades of gold and silver 
that have remained in favor, together with 
the new ones which have established them- 
selves, cannot be overlooked, for they add 
immensely to the attractiveness of all work 
in these metals. “Green” or antique gold, 
of somewhat tarnished and brassy aspect, 
made its dibut in America this year. A 
certain fascinating quality cannot be de- 
nied it, and as it is increasingly seen in 


jewelers’ stocks there is doubtless a good- 
ly contingent of admirers for its peculiar 
beauty, although progress has not been 
rapid with this style. Bright finish and 
Roman or yellow gold are always hand- 
some, but it is “rose gold” which has taken 
the public heart by storm. Everywhere 
in the charming tints with which the dif- 
ferent goldsmiths contrive to vary its 
pleasing glow, it elicits admiring com- 
ments. 

The incrustation of one precious stone 
with another, such as the encroachment of 
a tracery of tiny brilliants upon the edges 
of a large opal, is a fancy sometimes occur- 



ring; a small pearl has been noted set in 
the top of an opal ball stick pin and a 
large opal heart pendant shows dots of 
brilliants on its surface. In a resume of 
styles of the past year, and of those to 
which we may confidently look forward, 
perhaps the simplest way to place the 
reader au courant of the modes is to touch 
somewhat in detail upon the different lines 
covered by the jewelers, and here, again, 
coiffure ornaments lead the way. Fashion 
has ordained that these shall flourish in 
variety and numbers. Many fine pieces in 
diamonds are adjustable and serve either 
in the coiffure or on the corsage. Mount- 
ings for aigrettes permit the use of differ- 
ent ornaments on various occasions. To 
drape a rope of pearls among the waves 
of the hair has been one conceit of the 
season. Elegant and effective is the gem- 
hilted sword. The tortoise shell pin of 
two prongs, with jeweled top manipulated 
in double curves or loops, furnishes a pop- 
ular and useful accessory. 


February 6, 1901. 


Combs include tuck, side, back and pom- 
padour styles, and are of shell or amber, 
with gold, pearl or diamond decoration as 
a rule, though turquoises play a good part 
here, and emerald or other green stones 
are infrequently to be found. On side and 
tuck combs the gold decoration is usually 
a simply carved edge, and precious stones 
form a single narrow line. The tops of 
high combs frequently curve upward in 
graceful lines of diamonds around a large 
central stone that flashes in varying grada- 
tions of brilliancy with every movement of 
the wearer. 

The newest development in coiffure or- 
naments occurs in the clasp or brooch for 
the back of the head, which has proved a 
complete success and is almost as exten- 
sively in vogue to-day as any article of 
jewelry that could be mentioned. The 
long oval,say two and three-fourths inches 
by three-fourths of an inch, is the latest 
form assumed by this popular piece. 

In arrangements for the neck, the fact 
that at the recent Vanderbilt-French wed- 
ding one of Mr. Vanderbilt’s gifts to his 
bride was a long string of large and finely 
matched pearls indicates the present pres- 
tige of these beautiful jewels. Innumerable 
are the ways in which pearls are disposed. 
Long, thick cords composed of many 
strands of tiniest stones twisted together 
terminate in tassels formed of similar 
strands. There are long ropes of large 
pearls, which end in magnificent diamond 
drops. Simple necklets of one strand with 
a small diamond in the clasp furnish one 
of the most charming examples in pearls. 
Then there are affairs of two, three or 
more strands, and when the number grows 
larger, diamond bars, at intervals, hold the 
rows in place. Sometimes as many as 
24 rows of tiny pearls passed through 
clasps or slides form one of the well 
known broad collars. 

It is becoming quite the fashion to par- 
tially cover the lower portion of the neck, 
and this is accomplished by means of the 
broad collar of diamonds or pearls, a nou- 
veau art necklace, or by winding the pearl 
rope twice or more around the throat 
before allowing it to fall straight down 
or festooning it upon the corsage, which 
latter is one of the latest styles. 

In face of all that is new, a turn of fash- 
ion’s wheel has brought up again beads 
other than pearl. Opals are sometimes seen, 
and old fashioned gold and coral beads, 
the counterparts of those worn in this 
country many years ago, are much in evi- 
dence in single strand necklaces, and the 
coral in ropes, as well. Fanciful designs 
in necklaces, such as many pendants 
around a chain or an ornament forming 
festoons across the front, are too varied 
for description. While pearls and dia- 
monds continue the most elegant neck 
stones, color is by no means avoided, and 
emeralds, turquoises, rubies or their sub- 
stitutes, olivines, sapphires, topazes, ame- 
thysts, etc., all figure in fancy necklaces. 

Although it is true that rings may and 
often do extend in one unbroken line of 
brilliancy across the entire back of the 
hand, to wear them on the thumb or first 
and second fingers is not considered good 
form; but to compensate for this depriva- 
tion, society crowds as many as possible 
upon the third and last fingers. All gold 


February 6, 1901. 


THE JEWELERS’ CIRCULAR-WEEKLY. 


15 


X NEW DEPARTURE 


IN THE MANUFACTURE OF 


Crescent 

Watch 




/CRESCENT CASES have always contained more fine gold and given better 
service than any other. 

But there is a demand for a higher=priced case, and so, in addition 
to our regular line (whose high quality will be strictly maintained), we have 
now ready a case that contains about twice as much gold as any filled case 
made. Extra care has been taken in the finish and every detail has had the 
most minute attention. It is, as we have tried to make it. 


AN EDITION DE LUXE 






h CWCCO. 

MAR K. 

is Made oF TWO HEAVY plates oF 

FOURTEEN KARAT GOLD 

•nth gla^e oF Composrtion bi?twBen. 
SHOULD TUE GOLD PLATES WEAR 
Vthroughakew cask Win. be given 

IN EXCHANGE AT ANY TIME. 

fflalfhC>asPc0y 


of our regular work. We know that every jeweler will 
appreciate the desirability of handling these new cases, 
and the added satisfaction which they must 
give to customers, as they contain more 
gold and will wear longer and look better 
than many solid gold cases. 


CRESCENT 

EXTRA, 


SAMPLES AND PRICE=LISTS 
FROM THE JOBBING TRADE. 


The crescent WATCH CASE CO. 


NEW YORK. CHICAGO. BOSTON. SAN FRANCISCO. 


THE JEWELERS’ CIRCULAR-WEEKLY, 


February G, 19G1. 


“Silver Plate that Wears/' 



All these years the name 
I^Offers — as applied to 
knives, forks, spoons, etc. 

. , — has been famous. ^ 


IS THE 

ORIGINAL 

AND 

GENUINE 

MADE 

CONTINUOUSLY SINCE THE 
V YEAR ^ 

A.184TJI 


1850-1851 

1853 

1856-1857 

1859 

1862-1863 

1865 

1868-1869 

1871 

1874-1875 

1877 

1880-1881 

1883 

1886-1887 

1889 

1892-1893 

1895 

1898-1899 


1848-1849 

1852 

1854-1855 

1858 

186O-186I 

1864 

1866-1867 

1870 

1872-1873 

1876 

1878-1879 

1882 

1884-1885 

1888 

1390-1891 

1894 

1896-1897 


SOLD BY 

LEADING DEALERS 
EVERYWHERE. 


MADE ONLY BY 

Meriden Britannia Co. 

(international silver CO., successor), 

Meriden. Connecticut. 






i 

I 


iFetruary 6, 190l. 


THE JEWELERS’ CIRCULAR-WEEKLV. 


signet rings with engraved monogram, 
crest or device, constitute the latest fashion 
for women, and these are quite suitable 
for the little finger. Opals find immense 
favor with both sexes. -Strangely enough, 
while women have been annexing mascu- 
line perquisites in the way of watch-fobs 
and signet rings, men have quietly en- 
croached upon the province of the opposite 
sex and are now exhibiting an amazing 
[^enchant for that essentially feminine stone 
— the turquoise. According to a promi- 
nent ring maker many turquoise rings are 
sold to men, and opals and birth-stones 
were never so popular for everybody. The 
opal now occasionally stands by its own 
beauty in rings, being mounted alone, but 
oftener its mysterious fires burn in an en- 
tourage of brilliants, that conserves and 
heightens all its glow. Fine diamond, 
ruby and emerald rings have been remark- 
able for departure from conventional cut- 
tings. Much sentiment in shown in en- 
gagement rings in the way of jeweled 
hearts, true lover’s knots, etc. Flower 
rings are a foreign fancy, feather motifs 
have been utilized, the new art has intro- 
duced too many caprices to be more than' 
touched upon, and the story of the scarab 
in rings has become an oft-told tale. The 
marquise ring returned to favor in the past 
year. Clusters with a central stone of 
sapphire, ruby, emerald, opal or the like, 
remain one of the never failing delights. 
Two and three stones diagonally mounted 
afford a pleasing and standard style. 
FIoops are still worn. Hand carved rings 
are making a great run, and their massive 
character, either with or without jewels, 
renders them a handsome thing for men’s 
use. The animal fad has been very thor- 
oughly exploited in rings. The “tooth” 
ring furnishes a novel mounting for a sin- 
gle stone, and “all-gold” seals are a repre- 
sentative masculine style. The interesting 
intricacies of the various “banquet” rings 
may not even be entered into here. 

The brooch, always fashionable, has 
varied its forms almost beyond descrip- 
tion. Novelty here may be summed up in 
the term nouveau art. Standard diamond 
mountings for brooches usually assume the 
round, scroll and star forms. Diamond 
circles, crowns, crescents, feathers, sprays, 
swords, arrows, etc., hardly need mention. 
The “wreath” in the less expensive 
brooches is always with us. Gold brooches 
appear in round and other shapes of 
twisted wire and open work, enameled it 
may be or enhanced with semi-precious 
stones. Flowers, flags, reptiles, fish and 
fowl, rendered in silver, gold, enamels, 
stones or combinations of some of these, 
fill an important section in this line. 
Hearts, new moons, suns; stars, bow-knots, 
horse-shoes represent a different aspect of 
the article in question. Ivory miniatures 
and cameos in plain or precious stone 
mountings satisfy one phase of public 
taste, and a good, enduring brooch is fur- 
nished in the ovals with one large ame- 
thyst, topaz or other stone set in gold, 
small pearls or semi-precious stones. 
French designs in Louis XV., XVI. and 
Empire style hold their accustomed place. 

He who runs may read the popularity of 
the long chain, whether it be lorgnette 
chain, watch guard or muff chain. The 


patterns in gold of finely woven wire, in 
cable, rope, curb and other links of infinite 
variety, defy enumeration. The punctuat- 
ing point in guise of a precious stone still 
holds good. The muff chain has been 
adopted this season by those in the swim, 
and where last year the swell woman per- 
mitted herself only a silken ribbon or cord 
we now frequently see the familiar glitter 
of gold, or note gun-metal or strings of 
beads. 

In natural sequence to chains come metal 
purses, and here again the chronicler is 
daunted by the vastness of the field. Pos- 
sibly no single accessory of half useful, 
half decorative intent figures more strik- 
ingly in street costume to-day. Affairs of 
this sort, as it is almost superfluous to 
state, range from the tiniest specimens for 
silver change to large bags that take the 
place of the matinee and the old-time satin 
shopping bags. The smaller kind dangle 
on the long chain, or are tucked away in 
the corsage, while most of the larger ones 
hang at the side a la chatelaine, being pro- 
vided with chain and hook. 

Newest and most modish are those large 
bags of very fine flexible mesh which, by 
means of a row of rings set a little below 
the upper edge, draw up on chains, the top 
falling over like a wide frill, as in the 
satin bags with draw-strings. All shades 
of silver, especially the various oxidized ef- 
fects, prevail in chain purses; jewelry fol- 
lows the same course as in other decora- 
tive work. 

The flexible chain bracelet and the ban- 
gle literally flourish side by side, as it is 
not unusual for them to be worn together. 
In the former the designers vary the links, 
if not ad infinihmi at least to the extent 
of their ingenuity, in devising new pat- 
terns. The heavy curbs with padlocks, the 
daintier links with pendant of heart, 
clover-leaf, horse-shoe, ball, cube or fleur- 
de-lis, still give pleasure as engagement 
bracelets or gifts of friendship. Precious 
stones all of one kind, as in a bracelet all 
opals or all turquoises, are set closely to- 
gether, forming a chain. Popular gold 
bracelets are beautifully chased or ren- 
dered in twisted or rope designs. 

Ordinary watches for ladies, to be worn 
with guard chain, include open-face, hunt- 
ing and half-hunting cases. Silver watches 
with niello backs furnish an inexpensive 
yet decidedly chic style. Other rich orna- 
mentation for silver watches consists in 
etched flowers, monograms and various 
devices. Plain gold, plain enamel, ruby, 
turquoise, diamond or pearl pave backs 
are among established modes, while the 
record of fanciful jeweling would demand 
a volume to do it justice. 

Chatelaine watches, being necessarily of 
a highly decorative character, have seemed 
to provide a congenial field for Part nou- 
veau, and, save in brooches and pendants, 
its characteristics have not been better 
rendered elsewhere. Shaded gold, trans- 
parent enamels, fine stones, combined in 
quaint or symbolic designs, impart a de- 
cided interest to the study of watch cases 
in this rarely beautiful phase of art. 

The growing vogue of the watch fob for 
women is worthy of note by jewelers, and 
already the fine trade caters to the new 
fancy which, beginning with the upper 


\*t 


crust of society, is working its way down- 
ward. 

Omitting any mention of the watch 
fashions familiar to nearly every man, be 
he jeweler or not, it may be noted that an 
inspection of decorative confections of the 
finest kind reveal attractive and novel 
points in the representation of the figures 
on the dial, the color and finish of the case, 
its jeweling and enameling. The frequent 
occurrence of very flat watches for both 
men and women attracts attention. 

“Slow, but sure,” sums up the progress 
of the ear-ring. In exclusive shops where, 
year before last, it was conspicuous by its 
absence, the ear-ring now occupies a place, 
honorable, at least, if not extensive. Ear- 
rings are more worn in general, oftener 
worn by those near the apex of society’s 
pyramid, and are allowed a greater latitude 
of form than at the beginning of their 
struggle for a new career. Nevertheless, 
elegance or a neat, unobtrusive effect is 
demanded by prevailing taste in this or- 
nament. 

Fans would furnish a fascinating chap- 
ter, and a word should be said for the 
short handled lorgnette, which is becom- 
ing an exceedingly fashionable item of the 
costume. So much so, that it may be sus- 
pected that it figures often as a weapon of 
style rather than a requisite to vision. 

Scarf and stick pins, hat pins, sleeve 
links, studs and many minor articles pre- 
sent interesting variations in ornament, 
but apparently record no radical changes 
in construction. 

Of the breloques, charms, trifles that have 
raged like a whirlwind through every 
grade of society, what shall we say? This, 
at least — that those of some significance, 
which appeal to a certain element of senti- 
ment, imagination (superstition, if you 
will), which is one of the amiable weak- 
nesses of most people who are socially de- 
lightful, are not likely to disappear. But 
it is both a probable and a very grateful 
prospect that some of the banalities which 
have satiated a long suffering public may 
melt away into deserved oblivion. 


Marauders Endeavor to Burglarize the 
Store of Joseph Bitterly. 

Victor, Col., Jan. 30.^ — An attempt to 
burglarize the jewelry store of Joseph Bit- 
terly, Goldfield, early Sunday morning, 
was frustrated by one of Mr. Bitterly’s 
sons, who shot at and wounded one of 
the robbers. They cut out a panel from 
the back door of the jewelry store, turned 
the key in the lock and attempted to open 
the door, but a night latch near the top 
resisted them. The noise aroused the two 
boys, and the youngest, a lad of 12 years, 
fired three shots through the door. At 
the third shot one of the burglars cried 
out with pain and was heard to fall. John 
Bitterly saw three men running away in 
different directions; one was holding the 
side of his head. The boy again fired at 
him twice, and the second shot caused 
him to cry out. After daylight the man 
was tracked to the F. & C. C. Railroad 
trestle by a trail of blood. 


R. A. Creech, of Goldsboro, N. C., was 
recently married to Mrs. H. L. Daughtry. 


IS 


THE JEWELERS' CIRCULAR-WEEKLY. 


February 6, 1901. 


6etti mining in Ceylon. 


BY EDGAR HUHN. 

I T may be of interest to some of the 
readers of this journal to know hov. 
precious stones are fouml and the meth- 
ods used in mining' for them in Cey- 
lon; and I may say that, with very slight 
variations, the method is the same all 
through the Orient, with perhaps the e.x- 
ception ot the famous Burmah Ruby 
Mines, at Mogok. in Upper Burmah, 
whence we get the finest rubies and where 
the mines are worked by the Burmah 
Ruby Mining Co., of London. Eng., with 
modern methods. 

The districts in Ceylon in which most 
of the stones are found are in Ratnapura 
and Rakwana, both in the southwestern 
portion of the island and within about 30 
miles distance of each other, the former 
place being about 65 miles from Colombo, 
the chief port and gem market of Ceylon. 
It is a very curious feature in mining in 


Ceylon, that with the e.xception of the dia- 
mond, emerald, turquoise and opal, almost 
every ])recious and semi-precious stone 's 
found there and frequently a great variety 
of them are dug out of the same pit. 
Rakwana is especially famed for its sap- 
phires, and if a native dealer wants to 
thoroughly impress you with the quality 
of his goods, no matter where they may 
come from, he will assure you most sol- 
emnly that they are the true Rakwana 
sapphire. 

Almost all the dealers in gems are Mo- 
hammedans, the native Cingalese having 
very little to do with the business, except 
with the manual labor of digging for 
them. They are a fine looking race of 
people, but effeminate and have the repu- 
tation of being the most persistent and 
successful followers of Ananias that over 
were born. They do not in any degree 
possess business instinct. I found them a 
most pleasant and hospitable people, so I 
suppose I should not turn on them and 
give them such a bad character! 

The mines, or, I should be more cor- 


rect in describing them, diggings, are lo- 
cated in a rather mountainous country, 
and with the exception of the Everton 
mine, which has a depth of several hun- 
dred feet and which is considered to 
have been the most successful on the is- 
land, are really only shallow pits, usually 
measuring about six to 10 feet and rarely 
exceeding 10 feet in depth. 

There are certain well defined features 
in the geological formation of the country 
to be looked for in seeking for the gem- 
bearing ground, and when the spot is de- 
cided upon digging can proceed, provided 
one is possessed of the license granted b 3 ’ 
the proper authorities. 

The gems are found in a stratum of the 
earth usually from three to eight feet be- 
low the surface. The stratum is called by 
the natives Illam; it is a loose, gravelly 
soil and is easily manipulated; when a 
sufficient quantity has been brought to the 
surface the Illam is taken in small hand 
carts or carried in baskets on the heads of 
coolies to the nearest stream and there 
washed. This is done by means of a 
closely meshed sieve, made of plaited cane- 
strips and about 3U inches in diameter 
by nine inches deep, running to a conical 
point. 

The Illam is then thoroughly washed in 
the stream until only the clean pebbles 
remain. These are then brought ashore 
and sorted over and the gems picked out. 
It is in this process of washing that a 
white man, trying to work one of these 
mines, loses the best stones, as he cannot 
look over more than one washer at the 
same time, while the native is wonder- 
fully quick at throwing out a fine speci- 
men to a place where later on he can 
come and look for it. 

Spinels of all colors and garnets are al- 
most invariably found in conjunction with 
the other stones; also the different va- 
rieties of zircon, commonly termed jar- 
goon. Cat's-eyes are usually found to- 
gether with aquamarines and the different 
kinds of beryl, of which the alexandrite 
is the most sought after. 

"Ihere has also been some successful 
dredging in the Ratnapura river, and a 
party have been working in the river in 
diving suits, quite a new departure there. 
When I was there the results seemed most 
promising. 

Gem mining in Ceylon has of late 
years been much on the decline, owing to 
the old mining districts being seemingly 
worked out, and there are now compara- 
tively few people engaged in the industry, 
the majority being engaged in seeking 
plumbago, which is abundant and is read- 
ily marketable: or else they are working 
on the numerous estates, which, while 
bringing them in less money, is yet a sure 
livelihood for them at all seasons. 

A good proportion of the stones found 
arc cut locally in the village of Ratnapura 
and in Kalutara, a small place on the coasi 
some 40 miles south of Colombo. The 
(piality of the cutting is improving con- 
siderably, though the cutters still insist on 
making them very thick and bulky so as 
to have them weigh as much as possible. 

.\s this is only a very condensed outline 
sketch upon this subject I have not at- 
tempted to go into the manj' and very 
interesting scientific details which would 
be of interest only to a few readers. 




February 6, 1901. 


THE JEWELERS’ CIRCULAR-WEEKLY. 


19 



DMMONP SirrWG CiW' 


w have here illustrated a few 
views of our factory selected 
from our handsome catalogue, in 
which we also show a few selec- 
tions from our extensive line of 
Hand-carved Rings. We shall be 
pleased to send this catalogue on 
application. 


NEW YORK 


THE JEWELERS’ CIRCULAR-WEEKLY, 


February C, 1!)01. 


HO 


Ring Superstitions. 


BY MARY GAY HUMPHREYS. 

\ S far back as human record goes, 
superstition clings about gold and 
gems. The Bible is a repository of such 
superstitions. The glittering pages of 
Revelations are the source of numerous 
poetical beliefs that once had living force 
concerning the magical properties of 
gems. These are insuperably connected 
with the ring, which symbolized eternity. 
Together they were supposed to exert 
some occult power on most of the affairs 
of life. It seems a pit}" that the ring, 
which has a language capable of express- 
ing so many of the emotions and senti- 
ments, has come to be regarded only as a 
bauble, except in its matrimonial signifi- 
cance, where it still has vitality. 

If the old ring beliefs could be revived 
what well filled jewel cases and what be- 
coming finger adornment would we soon 
see. How entertaining would be the faith 
that, on going to a picnic, would exact a 
ring of onyx to drive away snakes, a ruby 
ring to ensure against possible thunder- 
storms, and a green stone, cn cabochon, only 
malachite instead of emerald, to make sure 
that no harm come from ice cream or 
lemonade. 

The ladies of ancient days were indeed 
fortunate in their medical prescriptions. 
Instead of going to the dentist they wore 
a ring of agate in which was cut a sala- 
mander with the words “Berto Bertion.” 
This was regarded as an infallible remedy 
for the toothache. There was an acknowl- 
edged efficacy in words which sound very 
pretty, though we don’t know what they 
mean. 

Jasper, owing to its prominence in the 
walls of the New Jerusalem, was one of the 
most valuable stones in securing personal 
safety. Better than any accident insur- 
ance policy was an elephant head, with a 
trident in the mouth, cut in jasper, to pre- 
vent shipwreck at sea. Jasper was particu- 
larly effective when set in silver. A jasper 
head inscribed with the letters B. B. P. 
P. N. E. should be in the possession of 
all hunters, for whom it will bring down 
big game. It will also help to make up 
quarrels between friends. 

Sardonyx is to be particularly relied 
on in straightening out the affairs of 
young people. If a man and a woman 
have a misunderstanding, and the young 
man send to the girl a lovely sardonyx 
ring, all will be forgiven. Sard is the 
most valuable to men. The ancients be- 
lieved that the wearing of it was the easiest 


road to any woman’s favor. Another 
favorite talisman is a pale sapphire, on 
which must be engraved a mermaid hold- 
ing a mirror. This assists in gaining any 
desire. After elections, or on going to a 
club or college society dinner, an amethyst 
ring is the proper adornment, for this en- 
sures against the ill effects of wine. 

Married women, on their parts, who 
wish to effect the affection of their hus- 
bands, should wear a jasper on which are 
cut three ravens. The three birds look 
like gossips having a fine dish of scandal. 
They are, in fact, only preventing it. The 
timid woman, when her husband is from 
home, has but to wear a beryl set in silver 
on which is inscribed the names, “Uriel, 
Gabriel, Raphael, Michael,” and it will 
keep away thieves. It will also guard her 
against sudden death, as the carbuncle does 
against fire. 

If illness is anticipated, the turquoise 
will give warning by turning pale — “sweat- 
ing” the old poets called it. A toad’s 
head on a ring used to be regarded as a 
sovereign remedy for cramps. Cramp 
rings, as they were called, were provided 
for every household, even as a hot-water 
bottle is to-day. Chalcedony was con- 
sidered supreme in lunacy and delirium. 

The most valuable secret possessed by 
the ancients was that a chrysolite set in 
gold would keep people from making 
fools of themselves. If we could so con- 
vince ourselves, what an era of ring giving 
would set in. One of the most amusing 
superstitions was that a silver ring made 
from five sixpences, collected from five 
bachelors and made into a ring by a smith, 
who was also a bachelor, would cure fits. 
A ring made from three silver nails taken 
from a coffin had a similar virtue. 

The Rosicrucian and astrological rings 
were assumed to have the power of a 
guardian angel, and held an omnibus con- 
tract to look after one’s welfare in all 
things. The Rosicrucian ring is a jasper 
on which is cut a salamander and the 
names of the three magi, Asmodiel, Nach- 
iel, Zamiel, or their signs. Another va- 
riety has an agate with such cabalistic 
words as “heth, agros, thebal, adros,” all 
of which have great virtue. For an astro- 
logical ring it is necessary to know under 
what star one is born. If the sun, the ring 
must be a diamond or sapphire; if the 
moon, a crystal in silver; Mercury, a mag- 
net in quicksilver; Venus, an amethyst in 
copper; Jupiter, cornelian in tin; Saturn, 
a turquoise in lead. With an astrological 
ring one may practice divination and con- 
juring. 

The planets govern the wearing of rings 


during the week. Sunday requires yellow 
stones. Alonday belongs to the moon, 
hence pearl, cat’s-eyes and crystals should 
be worn. Mars rules Tuesday and de- 
mands rubies and battle-red stones. 
Wednesday is Jupiter’s, lord of the heav- 
ens, so turquoise and sapphire, which re- 
flect the color of the firmament, should be 
worn. Thursday is Thor’s day, and to 
him the royal purple amethyst. Friday is 
sacred to Venus, the sea-born, and in her 
honor emeralds. On Saturday only wear 
the resplendent diamond, Saturn’s own 
stone. 

The ring as a badge of fidelity has a lore 
of its own. Its significance as a wedding 
ring needs no interpretation. There has 
been an effort to introduce the “gemmal 
ring,” whose continuity is not so absolute, 
as the more fitting marriage ring. The 
“gemmal” is several rings which separate, 
yet make one. The old rings of this sort 
had each a hand, and when joined, the 
hands clasped. If the persons separated 
or the troth was broken, one half was sent 
back. A divorced one would appro- 
priately wear half the “gemmal ring.” 

Posy rings were a pretty fashion. Posy 
contracts from poesie, and was thus 
named from the legends that were in- 
scribed in the rings. There is a vast col- 
lection of these: “Love me and leave 

me:” “My hart and I until I dye;” “I 
chuse not to change;” “When hearts agree, 
there God will be;” “God that fitt, this 
knot to knitt,” are instances of these. But 
the most significant of all is “Mulier viro 
subjecta est,” which is found in numbers 
of antique rings. 

The whole alphabet may be found in 
gems, Xanthite serving for X, and Zircon 
for Z. Thus “regard” rings are spelled 
out. When the Prince of Wales was be- 
trothed to the Princess, he gave her a 
ring in which a beryl, an emerald, a ruby, 
a turquoise, a jacinth and an emerald 
united to spell “Bertie,” his familiar name. 

The Germans used to make the manner 
in which the ring was worn of significance. 
Thus, if a man wanted to be married he 
wore a ring on his first finger of the left 
hand; if engaged, he put it on the second 
finger; if married, on his third; if he pre- 
ferred to remain single, he wore it on his 
little finger. The woman announced her 
intentions in the same manner on her right 
hand. 

There were a number of rings in olden 
times capable of wonder working in a 
large way. Foremost of these was the 
espousal ring of Mary and Joseph, which 
is one of the treasures of Perugia. It is 
composed of onyx and amethyst, and will 


The Bowden Rings 

ARE COMPLETE IN "VARIETY, CORRECT IN 
QUALITY AND PERFECT IN nNISH. WE 
MAKE E'VERY "VARIETY OF FINGER RINGS. 

J. B. BOWDEN & CO., 

* Maiden Lane, NEW YORK. 


February 6, 1901. 


THE JEWELERS’ CIRCULAR-WEEKLY. 


21 


Eternal Hustle, Coupled with Honesty and Integrity, is the Just Price of Success. 



S. O. BIGNEY & HIGH-GRADE GOLD-FILLED CHAINS, 

ATTLEBOROt MASS. N. Y. Office, 3 Maiden Lane. 



90 


THE JEWELERS’ CIRCULAR-WEEKLY. 


February 6, 1901 


irAR£S IN STERLING SILVERt THAT SELL. 


f U0. W, EeMall k ^0,. 


NEWARK, N. J. 


-CtRLIJVG 



S25 FIS® 


Samples at New York Salesroom. 
41 UNION SQUARE. 







1853 -- IQOI. 


TRADE-MARK. 


i ■ 


J. B. & S. M. KNOWLES CO., 

Sterling Silver Table Ware. 

OFFICE AND FACTORY. 91 SABIN STREET, 
PROVIDENCE, R. I. 








HEINTZ BROS., 


Ring 

Makers, 

BUFFALO, 
N. Y. 



Ring 

Makers, 

BUFFALO, 
N. Y. 


We make the largest line of Solid Gold Set Rings in America for the Retail Trade. 


cure any disorder if it will only occur on 
St. Joseph’s day, when the ring is dis- 
played with great ceremonies. Solomon’s 
ring, which was Masonic and cabalistic, 
could command the powers of the air and 
drive devils out of the nose. The ring of 
Gyges, king of Lydia, enabled him to ren- 
der himself unseen and do an unlimited 
amount of eavesdropping. More familiar 
than any of these is the ring of Poly- 
crates, which at this date seems to exist 
chiefly to puzzle the student of unknown 
languages, for no matter what language 
you take up, sooner or later you encounter 
the ring of Polycrates, and generally in 
metrical form. 


Serious Fire in the Store of Davis & 
Freeman. 

Atlanta, Ga., Jan. 26. — The jewelry 
store of Davis & Freeman, Whitehall St., 
was the scene of an exciting fire Friday 
night, caused by the igniting of chemical 
materials used by the watchmaker, A. S. 
Levison. The watchmaker’s department 
is situated just back of one of the large 
front windows of the store, and at the time 
of the accident, 9 o’clock, he was en- 
gaged at work. The flames from the 
burning chemicals caught the filmy cur- 
tains in the window, and in a few seconds, 
the elegant plate glass, reaching from 
floor to ceiling, was a mass of shattered 
fragments. The Fire Department re- 
sponded promptly and prevented the very 
disastrous fire which seemed imminent. 

Fortunately most of the watches be- 
longing to customers were in the vault 
and only a few on the outside were dam- 
aged. The watchmaker’s bench and out- 
fit were entirely destroyed. Besides the 
loss of the French plate window, which 
was probably the handsomest in the city, 
the flames destroyed an elegant regulator, 
badly damaged a massive show case, and 
a number of beautiful pieces of cut glass 
were broken. iMr. Levison was picked up 
unconscious, and though painfully was 
not seriously burned. His physicians say 
he will be out in a week or so. 

Davis & Freeman are putting in a new 
window to-day and business is proce?di“g 
as usual. The loss has not yet been es- 
timated. 


Dominick & Haff, 

MAKERS OF C XF PI IMH <^IIVFP 

WARES IN olIIltvLfllNvJ olL,VCtv trade only. 

860 Broadway, 

Union Square, New York. 

BONNER & CO., I 

• IWanufa tursra of “ 

1 FINB DIAMOND MOUNTINGS, | 

i 49 JOHN STREET, • • • NEW YORK. > 

Vest Pocket Directory for Buyers. 25 cents a copy . 

The Jewelers’ Circular Publishing Co. 


Reward for the Arrest of Alleged ^Dis- 
honest Watchmaker. 

Texarkana, .\rk., Jan. 24.— R. G. 
Northum, proprietor of Northum's Repair 
Works here, is offering a reward of $25 
for the arrest of a German watchmaker, 
Louis Swartz, who left his employ on the 
night of Jan. 21, taking numerous tools 
and watches belonging to Northum and his 
customers. Swartz is described as follow-: 
Height about 5 feet, 3 or 4 inches: 
light sandy mustache, gray eyes: left eye 
has larger pupil than right. M^alks very 
erect: weight 150 pounds; wore light col- 
ored trousers and brown check coat, dove 
colored hat with black band; fair complex- 
ion; age 45; black hair, considerably 
gray. Has considerable accent in speaking 
English. 

.Kny jeweler seeing Swartz is requested 
to telephone or telegraph Marshal Hugh 
Dean, Texarkana, Ark. 



February 6, 1901. 


THE JEWELERS’ CIRCULAR-WEEKLY. 


23 



New Goods for the New 

We have added considerably to our line of 

Chatelaine Bags 
and Purses, 


Year. 


and are keeping up 
our reputation for 

Style, Finish, 
fVoriimanship and 
Knight Trices, 

It is acknowledged the most 
complete and satisfactory line 
in the mark.t. 


HANDLED BY 
LEADING 
JOBBERS. 


WHITING & DAVIS, 

Manufacturers, 

PLAINVILLE, MASS. 

NEW YORK OFFICE, 14 JOHN STREET. 



24 


THE JEWELERS’ CIRCULAR-WEEKLY. 


February 6, 1901. 



The J. A. and B. of T. Annual. 


Interestia); Reports at the Annual Meeting of 
the Jewelers’ Association and Board of Trade. 

The annual meeting of the Jewelers' As- 
sociation and Board of Trade was held at 
Chi Maiden Lane, New York, Thursday 
afternoon. Interesting reports were pre- 
sented by president A. K. Sloan, secretary 
D. L. Saft'ord and treasurer P. T, Tuni- 
son, showing a prosperous condition of 
affairs. C. G. Alford was elected president 
for the present year. The address and re- 
port of the retiring president are here 
given in full: 

PRESIDENT SLO.XX's .\DDKESS. 

Cenih'men : — A year ago, when you electe<i 
me your president, 1 accepted against my 
will, as most of you know. 1 am a one 
term man and feel that every meniher in 
the Association who aspires to the honor 
of being president should have the oppor- 
tunity. Tf one m.an accepts it year after year 
what chance have they? But as you as- 
sured me I had served the new institution 
but six months, and feeling that my work 
was not quite complete, I accepted for 
another year, and now that our indebted- 
ness is all wiped out and we show a surplus 
of over ?,a,000, I can retire with a feeling 
that I have done my duty toward my fel- 
low members, and my successor can step in 
and, by careful watching, make this the 
greatest Board of Trade in the world. 

In the past year we have had quite a 
large increase in our membership. Our 
service in all departments of our business, 
especially in the handling of cases of fail- 
ure or bankruptcy, is very efficient and I 
think we get better results in such cases 
than could be obtained in any other way 
than through our corporation. 

Members should take a personal interest 
in affairs of our corporation and in oases of 
failures or bankruptcy at once place your 
claims with us so that we may exert our 
full power for obtaining best results. 

In September last there was raised 
through this Association and Board of 
Trade for the benefit of the (lalveston suf- 
ferers, $3.71.5..'i0. Of this amount $15,000 was 
sent to the Mayor of Galveston and the 
balance to the Clara Barton Red Cross 
Relief Fund. 

On Oct. 11 we extended an invitation to 
the .Manufacturing Jewelers’ Board of Trade 
of Providence to appoint a committee to 
meet a committee of our Board with a view 
of consolidating. Committees were ap- 
pointed and we met in Providence Dec. 

17. Matters are still awaiting further ac- 
tion by the Providence Board. 

Mr. John C. Day, one of our active di- 
rectors, died Oct. 31, 1900. The Board of Directors 
passed suitable resolutions, which were sent tojiis 
family. We have also lost by death two good 
members, John C. Mount and David Untermeyer. 

Our second annual banquet, on Jan. Ifi, you ail 
know was a complete success, and we have been 
highly complimented on it by outsiders. 

I want to thank the members of the Board of 
Directors, the members of the different commit- 
tees and the secretary and treasurer for the faith- 
ful manner in which they have performed their 
duties. It was their good work that has made the 
.Association and Board of Trade the pro.sperous 
institution it is. The secretary and treasurer’s re- 
ports will give you a full statement of our affairs. 

SECRET.XRY SAFEORd's REPORT. 

,V/r. ['resident and Members of the Jewelers’ Asso- 
ciation and Board of Trade: 

I xubmit for your consideration my annual re- 
port for the year ending Dec. 31, 19(K), as follows; 

On Jan. 1, IfkK), our membership was 341. Dur- 
ing the year .52 members have been admitted; 30 
have resigned and one was dropped from the roll, 
making our membership to Jan. 1. 1901, 362. 

As the report of the treasurer shows, we are not 
only out of debt but have a handsome surplus of 
over $.5,000. 

In producing this result we have not economized 
in any of the legitimate expenses of the business 
but have pushed our work as far as time and cir- 
cumstances would allow. 

We have revised and written during the year 14,- 


S43 reports as against 12,966 in the previous year. 

We have answered members’ inquiries for reports 
to the number of 38,154 as against 31,419 in the pre- 
vious year. 

We h.ave made changes and corrections in our 
Reference Book as follows: July issue, 8,232; 

January issue, 9,173, making a total of 17,405 as 
against 14,067 for the previous year. 

In our collection department we have handled 
2,998 claims as against 2,792 for the previous year. 
Of these we have collected 2,067 as against 1,570 for 
the previous year. The percentage of claims col- 
lected is very satisfactory, being 69 per cent, of 
the number of claims received and 51 per cent, of 
the amount of all claims handled, including bank- 
ruptcies. 

On July 1, 1900, we adopted a new schedule of 
fees which makes the expense of collections made 
through attorneys less than those charged by any 
.agency. 

Commencing Jan. 1, 1901, our schedule was still 
further amended so that now no charge is made on 


CHARLES G. ALFORD. 

DENT-ELECT, JEWELERS’ ASSOCIATION AND ROARI) OF T 

claims collected through us on draft jiaid throivgh 
banks or claims paid on demand from our office. 

In cases where debtors desire an extension or 
compromise 1 call your attention to a resolution 
of our Board of Directors adopted Xov. 13, 1899, 
as follows: 

"Resolved, That members be requested to refrain 
from signing any papers of compromise or settle- 
ment presemted to them by a dealer unless said 
pajier bear a certificate of this corporation that the 
delitor has filed with the corporation a full state- 
ment of his affairs, showing names of creditors, 
the amount owing each, his assets and liabilities, 
etc.” 

The wisdom of this course has been shown in 
several cases and there is no reason why it should 
not be carried out in all such cases and at no 
expense to the members. 

IJndcr our bankruptcy law the value of our 
corporation to its members has been showm in 
every case where we had sufficient claims to put 
us in control, and this value has come through 
this control. I will only cite the following: 

I’arish & Drake, of Columbus, O., made a bill 
of sale. We commenced proceedings in bank- 
ruptcy in which they filed schedules showing as- 
sets of only $28. Through our proceedings we 
compelled a composition at 66 2-3 per cent, on the 
$6.0n0 of claims we held. 

In the matter of the R. Jaccard Jewelry Co., of 
St. Louis, Mo,, in which action w,as brought for 
the appointment of a receiver in the State Court, 


our bankruptcy proceedings resulted in a settle- 
ment of 100 per cent, on the claims of over $90,- 
000 controlled by us. 

These and other cases which we have settled 
show the value of the concentrated action we can 
have through our members, and lead me to urge 
that in all cases of failure or bankruptcy, members 
at once place their claims with us so that we may 
be sufficiently strong to work out the best results 
for all. 

I have only to add that I see no reason why 
we should not make even greater progress this 
year than last. Our finances are in a satisfactory 
condition, we start the year with an assured income 
greater than last year, we have proved the benefits 
of our organization and our ability to aid our 
members, and with the continued co-operation of 
our members the limit of our usefulness is not yet 
in sight. 

The election of directors was according 
to nominations previously made by the 
nominatingcommittee chosen for the 
purpose at the last annual meeting, 
and resulted as follows: 

C. G. Alford, of C. G. Alford & 
Co.; II. A. Bliss, of Gorham Mfg. 
Co.; J. B. Bowden,’^ of J. B. Bowden 
& Co.; O. G. Fessenden, of H. W. 
Wheeler & Co.; C. E. Hastings, of 
Carter, Hastings & Howe; Alfred 
Krower, of Albert Lorsch & Co.; 

F. H. Larter, of Larter, Eleox & 
Co.; A. K. Sloan, of Sloan & Co.; 

G. W. Street, of G. O. Street & 
Sons; Henry Untermeyer, of Keller 
&: Untermeyer Mfg. Co.; G. W. Van 
Deventer, of Waterbury Clock Co.; 
C. P'. Wood, of C. F. Wood & Co.; 
Leo Wormier, of Julius King Op- 
tical Co., all of New York. Benj. 
.Allen, of Benj. .Mien & Co.; Grove 
Sackett, of William L. Gilbert 
Clock Co., and J. A. Todd, of Towle 
Mfg. Co., Chicago. George H. Ca- 
hoone, of George H. Cahoone & 
Co., and William A. Copeland, of 
Martin, Copeland & Co., Provi- 
dence. R. I. George K. Webster, of 
Webster Co., North Attleboro. 
Mass. 

The meeting chose the following 
officers for the year 1901: President, 

C. G, Alford: first vice-president. O. 

G. I'essenden; second vice-president. 

H. .\. Bliss. 

O. G. F'essenden presented the 
following resolution, which was sec- 
onded and unanimonsly carried: 
Resolved, That the thanks of this organization 
be and they are hereby tendered to the retiring 
president, -Migustus K. Sloan, for his earnest work 
during the two years he has been our pre.sident. 
\\ hen it is remembered that when he assumed 
office the organization was in debt and that dur- 
ing his administration not only has the debt men- 
tioned been wiped out but a surplus has been 
created, besides which an amalgamation of the 
Board of Trade and the Jewelers’ .-Association has 
been brought about, making the consolidated or- 
ganization one of the strongest of the kind in the 
country, w’e acknowledge with gratitude the earnest 
work he and his associate officers have given to 
the concern of the -Association — without which we 
would not have attained the position we now hold. 

Resolved. That these resolutions be spread upon 
the records. 

The meeting then adjourned. Secretary 
D, L. Safford and treasurer P. T. Tunison 
will continue in their valuable capacities. 

C. G. -\lford has been actively a.ssocia- 
ted with the jewelry trade for over 3i 
years. He was born in Williamstown. 
Mass., Oct. 28, 1815. He went to New 
(Coniimicd on [’age sg.) 

'‘Since deceased. 


February 6, 1901 


THE JEWELERS’ CIRCULAR-WEEKLY, 


25 


>, c •>< 

Vi 


6 

c §U a 

- Sr3 ^ 


c 

£-s;==3 

J I'S s 

>i<i a, V, 5 

_ <<0 Si 

O I ^ 

rj T w 

g ^ 

'-' °Jb c 
*, w o 


(/) 

o 


*-i t— «s 

W5 O 

SO 




> CO 

III -w(/l C 

B 

^ ^ !>s 


*0 

cj OA 




5 2^-2 




O) 

tt 

u 


(/) 


J3 'a M 
+- C ™ 

3*0 

Ovi4 o 
cj >-o ** 

Vi 

W-l O 

O W 

U1 fl 

^ s 

c w 

cS c 

s o 

S 

c c 
c 

w 

U1 f>, 
U <4 

>■ a 

•Ji o 
3 C 
o o 
>^*o 

3>^ 

> . 
3 ^ 

tt Jt3 

!r ^ 


X -o »: 

Q <^ Cl) 
=3vW 

e 

o2 


hJ 


U> 

(/) 

bl 

O 

O 




«i 

</) S 


0) *3'^ 

^ S 

— ' (^ +j 

■Jh 

t: bK) 
o -r 


>* b 
is J 
^ — 
cj 3 


33 







dSS§ 

-t* lO 
< M :m 


ffi8S8 

^ O >0 

w ^ 



•ooo 
S o o o 

^ CO CO 00 


iSSS 

<'^SS? 

w 


iH lO lO 
ir^ lO ICO 



eSS! 


I- 

Z 

3 

O 

o 

M 

o 

>- 

111 


Ui 

z 

O 

H 

CO 

>■ 

u 


O 

I- 

K 

O 

111 

CO 

3 

ta 

w 

ID 

u 

a 

a 


M. J. AVERBECK, 

19 MAIDEN LANE, 


NEW YORK 


2fi 


THE JEWELERS’ CIRCULAR-WEEKLY. 


February 6, 1901. 


We serve YOUR interests because they are OURS. Trade with us if you want 

Promptness! Accuracy! Intrinsic value! Fair and square dealing! 

OUR FACILITIES ARE THE BEST! ITS OFTEN SAID: ‘‘You are more prompt than 
any other house we ever did business with/' Send a TRIAL ORDER. 

Solid Gold Finger Rings, Lockets, Scarf Pins, Brooches and Barrettes. 






EACH. 

Ra4...$i 
Fine Fire 
Opal. 16 Pearl-5. 






' c 

c- 





EACH. 

EACH. 

EACH. 

EACH. 

EACH. 

EACH. 


EACH. 

,\10 .T27S. .$,'S..'>0 

R-B."?.... $13.00 

R31 $16.00 

R30 $16.00 

R32 $20.00 

R2!> $21.00 

R27. . 


Five Fine Opals. 

Fine Fire 

Two Fine Fire 

Fine Fire Opal. 

Five Fine Fire 

Fine Fire Opal. 

Fine 

Fire 

24 Pearls. 

Opal. 14k. Tif- 
fany Mounting. 

Opals. 14k. Tif- 
fany Mounting. 

14 k. Tiffany 
Mounting. 

Opals. 14k. Tif- 
fany Mounting. 

14 k. Tiffany 
Mounting. 

Opal. 

Pearls. 

15 Half 


R2«... 


EACH. 

$7.00 

Ruby, E m - 
e r a 1 d. Ame- 
thyst, Sapphire 
Doublet o r 
ImitattDn Tur- 
quoise Center. 
15 Half I'earls. 



EACH. 

7r» 

EACH. 

$10.00 

EACH. 

Ea $10.00 

El3 

EACH. 
.. $10.00 

EACH. 

E-4 $10.00 

EACH. 

E14 $10.00 

DE3 

EACH. 

EACH. 

U7 5 : 170 . .$i:i.<K) 

Satin Finish, 

Roman, Rose-Finish 

Roman Finish, B 

Roma 

n Finish, 

Roman Finish, 6 

Roman, Rose-Fin- 

Roman 

Finish. 4 

Satin Finish, 1 

Regular Cut Dia- 

Head, Emerald Eyes, 

Hall I* e a r 1 s, 1 

Emerald 

Eye, 1 

Half Pearls, 1 

ish Head. 1 Photo. 

Genuine 

Rose Dia- 

Regular Cut Dia- 

mond. 2 Photos. 

1 Photo. 

Photo. 

Photo. 

Photo. 

monds. 


mond. 1 Ruby, 1 
Sapphire. 2 Photon. 



. - ,_JL 

EACH. 

S20. . ,$i:.r.o 
Plain Ro- 
man C r e s- 
cent. E n - 
a m e 1 e d 
Daisy. 






EACH. 
S6 $3 .-,0 

EACH. 

S23 $3.7.-, 

EACH. 
S20 ... $:i.::5 

EACH. 

S22 $2.50 

S3 

EACH. 

$2.25 

EACH. 

SB5... $:{.25 

EACH. 

S54.... $:i.5o 

EACH. 

S:i2 ... $;5.oo 

S46... 

EACH. 

$.*{.75 

Fine 

Real 

Roman En- 

Green Gold 

Roman, Mat- 

Rose 

Fin- 

Matted Green 

Matted Green 

Matted Green 

Rose 

Finish, 

Opal. 

Rose 

ameled Hearts. 

Bird. Polished 

ted Finish, 

i s h, 

Ruby 

Gold Heart. 

(iold Leaves. 

Gold Heart, 

Real 

Fine 

hinish, Mer- 
cury Wings. 

Enameled For- 
get - Me-Not. 
Real Whole 
Pearl. 

Wish-Bone, 7 
Half l^earls. 

Fine Enamel. 

Eye- 

Bird, Opal and 
4 Pearls. 

6 Pearls, Lib- 
erty Bell. 

6 Pearls. 

Opal. 



EACH. 

S21 $:{ 7.-> 

Roman and En- 
ameled Crescent. 
Enameled Violet. 
Whole Pearl. 




EACH. 

B2I 

Plain Roman 
Crescent, Enam- 
el e d Daisies, 2 
Real Whole 
Pearls. 


EACH. 

EACH. 

EACH. 

EACH. 

EACH. 


EACH. 

B23 $6.75 

B63 $5.25 

B22 $5 .50 

B57 $6.00 

B.50 $.S.OO 

iioO 

. $<>.2*5 

Roman Wish-Bone, 

Rose Gold Fleur- 

Roman Crescent, 

Roman Crescent, 

Roman Hearts, 

Roman 

Enam- 

Enameled with For- 

de-lis. Real Whole 

Enameled with 

Enameled For- 

Enameled For- 

eled Circle, En- 

get-Me-Nots, E n a m- 

Pearl. 

Forget - Me-Nots. 

get-^Ie-Xots, En- 

get-Me-Xots, En- 

ameled 

4- Leaf 

eled \’ i 0 1 e t. Real 


Enameled 4-Leaf 

ameled Lily of 

ameled ^’iolet and 

Clover and En- 

Whole Pearl. 


Clover. Real Pearl 

the ^■alley and 

Forget-Me-X ots, '6 

ameled 

Forget- 



Center. 

Leaf. 

Real Pearls. 

.Me-.Nots, 

3 Real 






Pearls. 



EACH. 

B32 $7 . TO 

Matted Green 

Gold Heart, 1 2 
Real Pearls, Bird 
and Scroll. 



B 60 .. 

EACH. 1 

p,<;s.. 

EACH. 


EACH. 

oil 



EACH. 

$(>.OI> 

B.5S 

EACH- 

.... $3.50 

Hair 

Barrette. Burnished 

Hair Barrette. 

Burnished Gold, 

Hair Barrette. 

Roman Fin 

Hair Barrette. 

Plain 

Roman or Polished. 

Hair 

Barrette. 

Gold, 

Bead Inside Edge. , 

Corrugated. 

ish, Enameled 

Forget-Me- 

b:«> 


$ 3.75 

Polished 

Gold, 20 


1 


Nots. 

Ditto Smaller 

Size. 


Imitation 

Pearls. 


DISCOUNT SUBJECT TO “.KEYSTONE” KEY. 


CALL AT OUR SAMPLE ROOMS. 


19 MAIDEN LANE, 


J. AVERBECK, 


NEW YORK 


February 6, 1901. THE JEWELERS’ CIRCULAR-WEEKLY. 27 

WE ARE ALWAYS BUSY, Spring, Summer, Fall, Winter. WHY? EVERY 
wide-awake jeweler knows that the manufacturing house of M. J. AVERBECK has something 
NEW— THAT WILL SELL— that has INTRINSIC VALUE. 


Gold-Filled Barrettes, Scarf Pins, Dumbbell Links, Brooches are illustrated below. 






KBll $0.75 each. 

Hair Barrette. Plain Sterling 
Silver. 

KB4 $1.50 each. 

Larger size. 


XBl $1.25 each. 

Hair Barrette. Plain Sterling 
Silver. 

18/4045 $6.50 each. 

Small size. 


51B $1.00 each. 

Hair Barrette. Gold Filled, 
Green Finish. Rhinestone in 
Head, Emerald Eyes. 


X20/1120 $1.25 each. 

Hair Barrette. Gold Filled, 
Green Finish, Ruby Eyes in 
Snake. 


X20/1131....$0.75 ea. 

Hair Barrette. Gold 
Filled. Rose Gold Fin- 
ish. 


41/1112 $1.25 each. 

Hair Barrette. Roman, Gold 
Filled, Enameled 4-Leaf Clover 
set with Rhinestone. 


X20/11B2 $0.75 each. 

Hair Barrette. Roman, Gold- 
Filled Twist Wire. 


XB23 $3.50 each. 

Hair Barrette. Ster- 
ling Silver, 14k. Pol- 
ished Gold Finish, 40 
Imitation Pearls. 


X20/1128..$1.12 ea. 

Hair Barrette. Gold 
Filled, Green Finish, 
Ruby Eyes in Snakes. 


XB24 $1.12 each. 


Hair Barrette. Sterling 
Silver, 14k. Roman Gold 
Finish. 


EACH. 

4/878. $1.12 
Roman and 
n a m e 1 e d 
orse - Shoe, 
n a m e 1 e d 
iolet, Pearl 
mter. 


EACH. 

7/352.$1.00 

14 Rhine- 
stones. 


EACH. 

7/340..$! 

Roman 
Finish, 
Real Opal. 


EACH. 

26S.$1.00 

Rose Fin- 
ish, Rhine- 
stone Cen- 
ter. 


EACH. 

SOS. $0.75 

Rose Fin- 
ish, Imita- 
tion Tur- 
q u o i s e 
Matrix, 6 
Pearls. 


EACH. 

2SS.$0.50 

Pf^lished. 


EACH. 

22S...$0.8S 
Rose Fin- 
ish, Ruby 
Eyes. 


EACH. 

15S . $0.50 

Polished, 

Doublet 

Center. 


EACH. 

16S.$1.<M» 

Polished, 
Real Opal. 


EACH. 

23S.$0.75 
Rose Fin- 
ish, Imita- 
tion Tur- 
q u o i s e 
Matrix, 
Rhine- 
stone. 


jiAcn. I 

24S...$0.75 I 

Rose Fin- 
ish, Rhine- 
stone and 
Pearl. 


EACH. 

21S $0.58 

Rose Finish, 
Pearl. 


40B $0.75 each. 

Hair Barrette. “L’Aig- 
Ion,’* Gold Filled, Rose 
Finish. 



EACH. 

2GL.... $1.25 

Polished, 
Concave Cen- 
ter, Bead Edge. 


EACH. 

3oL. . . . $1.75 
Polished, 
Gold Front, 
Engraved. 


EACH. 

lOL ... $1.50 

Polished, 
Bead Edge. 


EACH. 

48L $1.50 

Polished, 
Fancy Chased. 


EACH. 

5L $1.25 

Rose Finish. 


EACH. 

27L.... $1.25 

Polished, 
Scroll Edge. 


EACH. 

23L... $1.00 

Green Finish, 
Dog’s Head, 
Garnet Eyes. 


EACH. 

4L $1.25 

English Finish, 
Heavy Scroll. 


EACH. 

>L $1.00 

Polished Fin- 
1 , Fancy Scroll 
dge. 


EACH. 

25L.... $1.00 
Green F i n- 
ish. Elephant 
Plead, Garnet 
Eyes. 



lose Finish, Imi- Green Finish, Pearl 
tion Turquoise Set, Ruby Eye. 
itrix. 


Rose Finish, 2 
Imitation Pearls, 
Fine Imitation 
Turquoise Matrix. 


Plain Roman 
Crescent, 2 Enam- 
eled 4-Leaf Clov- 
ers, 5 Imitation 
Pearls. 


25B...$0.75 each. 
Rose Finish. 


37B $2.50 each. 

Rose Finish, Ruby 
Eyes, Pearl in Mouth, 
Imitation Turquoise. 


74B $1.25 each. 

Polished W i s h - 
Bone and Scroll, 
Green Gold Leaves, 
Rhinestone Set. 


each. 


Green Finish, 
Oval Imitation 
Amethyst. 


DISCOUNT ACCORDING TO “KEYSTONE” KEY. 



19 MAIDEN LANE, 


AVERBECK, 


Manufacturer, 

NEW YORK. 



28 


THE JEWELERS’ CIRCULAR-WEEKLY. 


Februarj^ 6, 1001. 


THE GROWTH OF M. J. AVERBECK'S BUSINESS IS PHENOMENAL. 

Get into the band wagon. FOLLOW OUR LEAD! BUY OUR GOODS. Your 
business will surely grow. 


A few of our new staples are illustrated below. 

Gold-Filled Hat Pins, Lockets, Fob Chains. 


We replace every piece of our Gold-Filled goods that does not wear and give entire satisfaction. 



41M 


each 


r»M $0.7o each. 


4M 


each. 


7.\1 $J.OO each. 


HM 


$0.7i> each. ' <>M $1.50 each. 


“L’Aiglon,” Roman, Gold Filled. 14 
Rhinestones, Ruby Kye, Spiral Top. 


Roman, Gold Filled. 
2 Rhinestones, 1 
Doublet, Spiral Top. 


Roman. Gold Filled. 11 
Rhinestones, 3 Enameled 
4-Leaf Clovers, Spiral 
Top. 


Roman, Gold Filled. Roman, Gold Filled. .6 
9 Rhinestones, 5 Rhinestones, Spiral Top. 
Turquoises, Spiral 
Top. 


Roman. Gold F'illed. H 
Rhinestones, 3 Enameled 
4-Leaf Clovers, Ruby 
Flyes, Spiral Top. 



XEI... 

each. 

7K .$4.00 each. 

•JiTE 

each. 

.^^..10 each 

XKl $a.OO each. 

XK— each. 

S t e r ] 

i n g Silver 

Gold-Filled Locket. Satin 

(iold- Filled Locket, 

Ko- 

Gold - Filled Locket, 

Sterling Silver Locket. 
Holds 2 IMiotos. 

Sterling Silver Locket. 

Locket. 

Photos. 

Holds 2 

Finish, 2 Rhinestones, 7 
Pearls. Holds 2 Photos. t 

man. Holds 1 Photo. 


./Roman or Polished. 
) Holds 2 Photos. 

Holds 2 Photos, 



1 $—.75 each. 

Silk Fob. Gold - Filled I rim 
mings, Rose Finish, Real .Stone 
Charm. 


401) each. 

L — I) $1,154 each. 

30D. ..$4.75 each. 

— ID $l£.i£5 each. 

i*i) 


Silk Fob. Gold- l•'ille(l 

.Silk Fob. Rose Gold 

■Ml Metal Fob. 

Silk Fob. Polished 

Silk Fob. 

Fine Polish- 

Trimmings, Polished. 

'Frimmings, Imitation Tur- 
(juoisc ^Tatr^x Charm. 

Gold Filled, Rose 
Finish, Seal 
Charm for Engrav- 
ing. 

Gold - Filled T r i in ■ 
mings. 

cd. Gold - Filled T r i m- 
mings. Real Stone Intag- 
lio. 


PRICES.:SUB JECT TO “KEYSTONE” KEY DISCOUNT. 


M. J. AVERBECK, 

19 MAIDEN LANE, 


NEW YORK 


February 6, 1901, 


THE JEWELERS’ CIRCULAR-WEEKLY. 


29 


National Monthly Import and Export Statistics. 


Washington, D. C., Jan. 30. — The records of the Treasury Department contain 
the following comparative statistics of interest to the jewelry trade for December, 1899 
and 1900, and for the 12 months ended December, 1899 and 1900; 


Clocks and parts of 

Watches, materials and movements 

Diamonds, glaziers’ diamonds, etc., unset; dia- 
mond dust or bort and watch jewels (free) 

Diarnonds, n. e. s., not set (dutiable) 

Precious stones, rough or uncut (free) 

Precious stones and pearls, not set 

Jewelry and manufactures of gold and silver 


IRTS. 


—12 Months 

Ending — 

Dec., iSgg. 

Dec., 11 ) 00 . 

Dec., 1899 . 

Dec., zpoo. 

$26,561 

$29,027 

$325,993 

$357,255 

121,573 

145,209 

1,208,750 

1,560,087 

272,651 

4,567 

4,898,756 

3,713,617 

175,203 

878,040 

8,803,482 

7,865,485 

399 

3,061 

56,861 

37,602 

402,580 

139,858 

2,850,435 

1,737,679 

231,056 

1,207,929 

4,480,947 

2,631,742 


EXPORTS OF DOMESTIC MERCHANDISE. 


Clocks and parts 

Watches and parts 

Jewelry and manufactures of gold and silver. 
Plated ware 


115,619 

66,577 

85,707 

43,605 


120,360 

92.565 
89,397 

48.566 


1,147,848 

702,793 

997,850 

410,803 


1,202,655 

901,664 

1,291,492 

493,528 


EXPORTS OF FOREIGN MERCHANDISE. 


Clocks and parts 

Watches, materials and movements 

Diamonds, rough, including miners’, glaziers’, etc. 

Diamonds, n. e. s. (dutiable) 

Other precious stones, rough or uncut (free) 

Precious stones and pearls, not 'set..... 

Jewelry and manufactures of gold and silver 


3,941 


383 

437 


768 


5,833 

2,362 

‘33,198 

732 

15,326 

24,965 


693 

1,521 

3,437 

149 

3,586 

7,037 

9,278 


(Continued from page 24.) 

York in 1863, and when 20 years old 
started in business for himself, in the dry 
goods line. Five years later he estab- 
lished the present firm of C. G. Alford & 
Co. The business was incorporated in 
1891. Mr. Alford was one of the founders 
of the Jewelers’ Security Alliance. He 
was one of the incorporators of the Jew- 
elers’ Safety Fund Society and has always 
been a director of that organization. 


George W. Ball’s Store Robbed of a 
Considerable Quantity of Goods. 

Hartford, Conn., Jan. 30. — George W. 
Ball’s jewelry store, 65 Pearl St., was yes- 
terday noon cleverly robbed of about $1,- 
000 worth of diamond jewelry while Mr. 
Ball was at lunch. The store was in 
charge of a boy, who has been working 
there a short time, when two well dressed 
strangers entered. One man stood near 
the window where the rings were displayed 
in a tray, while the other man walked to a 
table in the middle of the store and 
showed an alarm clock to the boy. He 
said there was something the matter with 
it. It was wrapped in a newspaper, and 
as he put the clock down he unfolded the 
pages of the paper so that the man in 
front was shielded from view. The man 
with the paper said there was an adver- 
tisement he wanted to see and he held 
the paper in front of the boy until the 
confederate had emptied the tray of the 
following: One cluster ring, turquoise, 

value $100; one Princess ring, $95; one 


solitaire ring, karat, $150; three solitaire 
rings, f karat each, $75; two solitaire 
rings, 1 karat each, $200; three solitaire 
rings, I karat each, $150; three small dia- 
mond rings, valued at $25 each, $75. When 
the man with the paper finished reading 
the advertisement both left. The boy went 
to the window as soon as they had gone 
and saw that the rings had been stolen. 
When Mr. Ball returned the police were 


notified and a description of the men was 
given them. 


E. B. Hall, Fayetteville, Ark., has taken 
charge of a large jewelry establishment 
in Springfield, Mo. 

F. J. Kempel’s jewelry store, Faribault, 
Minn., was entered recently by burglars 
and a quantity of valuable silver and plated 
ware was stolen. 





PAT. MAY 31.98 


the “PRISCILLA” 

sterling Silver 
THIMBLE. 


WE’LL BE PLEASED TO 
SEND YOU OUR GOLDand 
SILVER THIMBLE CAT- 
ALOGUE and PRICE-LIST, 


You Would Like ! HLK 


........ 


MATCH 

BOX. 


TO INCREASE YOUR THIMBLE 
BUSINESS, WOULDNT YOU ? 

OUR PRISCILLA THIMBLE 
WILL PROVE TO BE OF GREAT 
ASSISTANCE IN THAT DIREC- 
TION. TRY IT. 


SIM0NS,BR0.&C0.,| 


Made in Shape of 
an Elk’s Tooth. 

A MOST ATTRACTIVE NOVELTY. 
EVERY ELK WILL WANT ONE. 

We make it in Sterling Silver, 

Sterling Silver with Gold Lid, 
Solid 14k. Gold. 


We’d like you to become acquainted 
with our silverware line, too. 


Silversmiths, 

Cbimble makers, Jewelers. 


PHILADELPHIA, 
616 Chestnut Street. 


NEW YORK, 

19 Maiden Lane, 

41 Union Square. 


CHICAGO, 

703 Columbus 

Building. 



PATENTC D. 

WRITE FOR PRICE-LIST. 











30 


THE JEWELERS’ CIRCULAR-WEEKLY. 


February 6, 1901. 


H 

I 





No. 10. Ro.se Gold Finish. 7Sc. each, 
less 10 per cent. cash. 

Send for selection. 

FOBS, Ladies’ or Gents’; 

HAIR CLASPS, BROOCHES, 
HATPINS, CUFFLINKS, j 
FISH-SCALE PURSES. 

A one-cent postal card brings selection of 
20th Century Spring Novelties. 


CHAS.L TROUT & CO. 

5 & 7 Maiden Lane, New York, N.Y, 


Julius King Optical Co. Against the Gar- 
nishees of Hanf Optical Co. 

Chester. Pa., Jan. 30. — In the Court of 
Common Pleas, Saturday, Judge Johnson 
handed down the following opinion in an 
appeal of the garnishees of the Hanf Opti- 
cal Co. The action is by the Julius King 
Optical Co. against various fire insurance 
companies and others, garnishees of E. E. 
Hanf: 

The plaintiff on ilay 29, 1900, recovered a judg- 
ment against E. E. Hanf, trading as the Hanf 
Optical Co., before Alderman Smith, of the city 
of Chester, for $285.35. 

On June 19, 1900, an. attachment execution was 
issued on this judgment and the above named 
fire insurance companies and Sweeney & Clyde, 
summoned as garnishees. After hearing, judg- 
ment was rendered against the garnishees for 
$285.35. 

From this judgment the garnishees appealed 
and on Aug. 19, 1900, filed their appeal in the 
Court of Common Pleas. 

Nothing further was done in the case and on 
Dec. 12, 1900, the insurance company gar- 
nishees presented to the Court the following pe- 
tition. 

The Judge then recites in full the peti- 
tion of the insurance companies and 
brokers, in which they say that by reason 
of the attachment they are in danger of 
being sued by the Hanf Optical Co. for 
the recovery of the insurance, and having 
no interest in the funds * * * ^^e 

ready and willing to pay the $'2,o00 to the 
parties entitled thereto, or pay that amount 
into Court, or such amount as the Court 
may direct. They conclude by asking that 
the Court award a feigned issue, wherein 
the Julius King Optical Co. will be the 
complainant and the Hanf Optical Co. the 
defendant, to settle the dispute; and that 
the companies then be released from re- 
sponsibility and allowed proper costs and 
counsel fees. The Judge then continued in 
part; 

It is suggested that $500 is a sufficient sum to 
be paid into Court to satisfy the plaintiff’s judg- 
ment and costs. 

I can see no reason for requiring the garnishees 
to pay into Court more than sufficient to satisfy 


plaintiff’s judgment. Nor can I see any reason why 
the inter-pleader should not be granted. 

I cannot, as requested, order the remainder of 
the funds in the hands of the garnishees paid to 
the Hanf Optical Co. 

It is true that garnishees in their petition admit 
that the loss of the Hanf Optical Co. has been ad- 
justed at $2,500, but this gives the Court no au- 
thority to order them to pay the money » * * » 
Let an order be drawn permitting the garnishees 
to pay into Court the sum of $050, less fees and 
costs to be taxed by the Court; also granting a 
feigned issue in which the Julius King Optical 
Co. shall be plaintiff and the Hanf Optical Co. 
defendant. 

Upon such decree being signed and money paid 
into Court, the garnishees are hereby relieved of 
all duty or liability on said attachment. 


Death of Fred. C. Boerner. 

Fort Worth, Tex., Jan. 30. — Fred. C. 
Boerner, a prominent jeweler of this city, 
passed away Friday, at the age of 47 years. 
The stroke of paralysis which he sustained 
on the 13th of last July was the cause of 
death, though everything that medical 
science could do for him was done. He 
was taken to Hot Springs, Ark., but re- 
turned a few days ago. The funeral was 
held Sunday, from his residence, corner 
of W. 1st St. and Royal Ave., under the 
auspices of Red Cross Lodge, Knights of 
Pythias, of which he was a member. Rev. 
Junius B. French, assisted by Rev. Cha'^les 
R. Hyde, conducted the services. 

Air. Boerner was a native of Michigan, 
having been born in Detroit, but when 
two years of age his parents removed to 
Cincinnati, where they resided for thr^ e 
years, afterwards going to Vevay, Ind. 
He came to Texas in 1879 and first lived 
at Ennis; then he opened a jewelry store 
in Waxahachie, coming to Fort Worth 
in 1887. Here, on June 14, 1899, he mar- 
ried Aliss Elizabeth Frances Craft, They 
have one child, a daughter. 


T. R. Helms, a jeweler who has been 
in Waxhaw, Fla., for some time, has lo- 
cated in Alarshville, Fla. 


REMOVAL, 

OFFICE AND factory. 

Woods & Chatellier, 

GOLD AND SILVERSMITHS, 

ARE NOW LOCATED AT 

36 EAST 22d street, 

NEAR BROADWAY, 

New York City. 

TELEPHONE, 3939 1 8th St. 



E8TABLIRIIIED 1859. 

HERMAN KOHLBUSCH, 

Manufacturer of 
Fine llalances and 
Weights 

for everj purpose where a-o- 
curacy U required. 

Office and Halearoom, 

194 BROADWAY, 

BEND FOR PRiCB-Lisi. Tel., 870 CortUndt. NEW 



February 6, 190>1. 


THE JEWELERS’ CIRCULAR-WEEKLY. 


31 




INTERESTING TO LARGE 
DIAMOND BIYERS. 


^^UR continuous and extensive purchases of 
Rough Diamonds under most advantageous 
conditions, superior facilities in our Cutting Works 
( the largest in this country ), and improved equipment, 
surpassing any in Europe, enable us to offer to 
Importers and large Diamond Dealers original lots 
below European prices, besides the saving of 10 per 
cent. duty. 

This announcement means exactly what it says. 


STERN BROS. & CO., 


CUTTING WORKS, 
138=142 West 14th Street, 
NEW YORK. 

CHICAGO, 

149 State Street. 

LONDON, 

29 Ely Place. 


68 Nassau Street, 


New York. 




THE JEWELERS’ CIRCULAR-WEEKLY 


February 6, 1901. 




Burglars Raid Dr. W. M. Harper’s Jew- 
elry Store. 

Corsicana, Tex., Jan. 23. — Burglars 
last night broke into the drug and jewelry 
store, at Rice, owned by Dr. W. M. Har- 
per, and made away with $100 worth of 
jewelry. The thieves effected an entrance 
through a rear window. Dr. Harper 
came to Corsicana this morning, as he h.ad 
reason to suspect three parties, and be- 
lieved the}" had come to this city. This 
suspicion was strengthened by the finding 
of the trays which had contained jewelry 
lying by the railroad track about a mile 
south of Rice. Dr. Harper caused the 
arrest of Charles Montgomery and one 
Gibbons. Gibbons at once confessed and 
implicated Fred. Smith, who was also ar- 
rested. The three were searched and jew- 
elry found in their possession was identi- 
fied by Dr. Harper as his property. The 
three men are now on trial in Justice 
Roberts’s Court. 


Charged with Stealing from j. Stuart 
MacDonald’s Store. 

W.ASHiNGTON, D. C., Jail. 26. — Charged 
with the larceny of a cluster diamond pin 
valued at $75, from J. Stuart MacDonald, 
jeweler, Baltimore, a man giving the name 
of John Smith was arrested here last night 
by Detective Kratz. Diamonds and jew- 
elry valued at $500 were found on him 
when he was searched. It is supposed 
that he also stole a large majority of this 
in town. A woman, Mabel Harris, was 
also arrested and is detained as a witness. 
The articles found on him include three 


diamond studs, two diamond stick-pins, an 
emerald and diamond pin, a cluster dia- 
mond pin with a ruby center, a gold 
chain with a diamond locket, and several 
Masonic charms with diamond settings. 

The police believe Smith is an expert 
thief and that Smith is not his name. 
The prisoners were locked up at the Cen- 
tral Station. 


Worcester License Board Remove Boy- 
cott on Sidewalk Clocks. 

Worcester, Mass., Jan. 26. — The boy- 
cott on sidewalk clocks has been removed 
by the license board. Last week, after a 
short hearing, the board granted permis- 
sion to the Hall & Lyon Co., 10 Front 
St., to locate such clocks in front of their 
store. George T. Scott was before the 
board but was not certain what pattern 
of clock he would adopt, and his petition 
will be acted upon later. The disposition 
of the board is to grant permits when it 
is assured the clock will be an ornament 
to the street. The permits granted yester- 
day are for illuminated clocks of neat de- 
sign, set in a mortar to be erected. 


Death of Abraham Van Wart. 

Englewood, N.J., Jan. 30. — Abraham Van 
Wart, head of the jewelry firm of Abraham 
Van Wart & Sons and an old and respect- 
ed resident of this place, died last week 
after an illness lasting several weeks of 
Bright’s disease. Mr. V'an Wart was en- 
gaged in the jewelry business on Dean St. 
for many years. A widow and three sons 
survive him. 


The Safe of Harry P. Wilson & Co. 

Robbed of jewelry. 

Columbus, O., Jan. 26. — A bold robbery 
took place at the jewelry store of Harry 
P. Wilson & Co., on the viaduct, Wednes- 
day evening, when more than $400 
worth of rings was taken from the safe 
before the store was closed. W. L. John- 
son, who has charge of the business for 
Oris J. Fisher, who was appointed receiver 
for the business some time ago, had left 
the store at the usual time. W'ilson & Co. 
and Gallagher Bros., tailors, both occupy 
the room and both use the safe, and for 
this reason it was unlocked. Ed. Gal- 
lagher was there alone and had occa- 
sion to go to the basement for about 10 
minutes about 8 o’clock. On his return 
he took his books to the safe and, as he 
was putting them in he stepped on a shirt 
stud lying on the floor. On investigation 
he found that the jewelry trays had been 
disturbed and at once sent for Mr. John- 
son. He went over the stock and it was 
found that about 52 rings had been taken, 
among them two solitaire diamonds. The 
others were all cheaper rings. One of the 
studs dropped on the floor was worth $70. 

It is believed that the robbers are local 
men who had a good knowledge of how 
matters were conducted about the store. 
Detectives have been at work on the case 
for some days and the statement was made 
Saturday they had a good clue to the 
men who committed the crime. 

Prof. Bouvee, with C. D. McElvain, Red 
Oak, la., has given up his position and re- 
turned to Omaha. 


PEARLS. 




t 

t 

t 

♦ 

4 ( 


The Dealer’s Side 
Of the Question. 


CHICAGO. 


Where the dealer can find the largest and best assortments, 
there can he make the best selections. Where he can find 
the best understanding of his needs— an understanding born of 
wide experience — there can he purchase most safely. 

Both the right assortments of goods and the right understanding 
of his needs he will find here. 

Alfred H. Smith & Co., 

182 Broadway, N. Y. 




LONDON. 


DIAMONDS 


And other Precious Stones 


February 6, 1901. 


THE JEWELERS’ CIRCULAR-WEEKLY 


33 


Decision in a Jeweler’s Sample Case 
Suit of lo Years’ Standing. 

Des Moines, la., Jan. 30. — An interest- 
ing suit, that has lasted 10 years, over a 
jeweler’s sample case, was brought to an 
end in the Supreme Court Monday. The 
case was that of the Weber Co., appellants, 
vs. the Chicago, St. Paul, Minneapolis & 
Omaha Railway Co. It was an appeal 
from the O’Brien District Court, F. B. 
Gaynor, Judge. The Supreme Court de- 
cision, written by Judge McClain, sustains 
the trial court, thus leaving the victory 
with the railway company. 

Action was begun in 1891 by the Weber 
Co. to recover the value of certain jewelry, 
said to be worth over .$1,000, contained in 
a jeweler’s sample case delivered b 3 ^ a trav- 
eling agent of the plaintiffs to the railway 
companj' to be transported as baggage. 
From a judgment for the plaintiffs upon a 
verdict, the defendants appealed to the Su- 
preme Court and the judgment was re- 
versed. After the case was remanded to 
the lower Court the plaintiffs amended their 
petition and another trial was had in which 
there was a directed verdict for the de- 
fendants. From judgment thereon the 
plaintiff’s appealed. 

It appeared the traveling agent had three 
trunks checked. Their combined weight 
being greater than the amount allowed to 
be carried free, he paid 50 cents excess bag- 
gage charges and received a receipt there- 
for. Subsequently and before the trunks 
were placed in the baggage car one of 
them was stolen, and it was for the con- 
tents of this that action was brought. 
There was a rule of the company that 


agents must not receive jewelry sample 
cases for storage or check them as bag- 
gage under any circumstances without a 
permit had been issued the passenger from 
the general office of the company. 

“If the plaintiff,” says the Court, “had such rea- 
sonable knowledge of the regulation with refer- 
ence to jewelry isample cases, and the evidence 
of that fact is conclusive, then It could not hold 
the company liable for jewelry samples, even 
though its agent induced the baggage agent to 
check them without the permit required by the 
regulations. * * We hold that where the 

agent’s authority is expressly limited In this re- 
spect. and the limitation is known to the pas- 
senger, the act of the agent in violation of the 
regulation will not bind the company unless some- 
thing in the nature of a waiver of the regulation 
is shown, and there is nothing of the kind in this 
case. 

“Appellant, while apparently conceding that the 
defendant did not become liable for these jewelry 
samples as baggage, still insists there was a lia- 
bility for them as warehouseman and that there 
v;as negligence on the part of the agents of the 
defendant in caring for the trunk, such as would 
charge the defendant with loss thereon in that ca- 
pacity. But the baggage agent had no more au- 
thority to receive these jewelry samples for the 
company as warehouseman than as carrier.” 

As to the contention of the plaintiffs that 
the failure of the defendants to .tender a 
return of the 50 cents received for excess 
baggage is a waiver on their part of any ob- 
jection that the merchandise was checked 
as baggage, the Court points out this sum 
was received not for transporting mer- 
chandise, but for transporting excess 
weight baggage. 


L. Reinheimer has rented the De- 
Graff building at 522 Main St., Joplin, 
Mo., and will reopen his jewelry store 
there. 


Hearing In the Bankruptcy Proceedings 
of the American Jewelry Co. 

New Haven, Conn., Feb. 1.— -The hear- 
ing of the American Jewelry Co., of this 
city, in the matter of the petition in bank- 
ruptcy of Charles E. Katsch has been go- 
ing on for two days before Referee New- 
ton. The counsel for the jewelry com- 
pany allege that they were organized Dec. 
25 last. The stockholders were Mr. and 
Mrs. C. E. Katsch, attorney M. Over- 
lander, trustee, Mr. Rogers, of this city, 
and Irving M. Dewey, of New York. It 
is claimed that the last is ill and cannot 
come here to testify. Dewey held two 
shares of stock for himself and 35 shares 
as trustee. 

It is claimed that Katsch bought about 
$7,000 worth of jewelry between September 
and December. In December the com- 
pany were formed and the goods were 
moved to the Washington building. The 
goods were attached by the creditors in 
January, and Mr. Katsch petitioned to be 
placed in bankruptcy. Samuel Goodman, 
of S. Goodman Co., was appointed trus- 
tee of the estate. The creditors claim 
that the company were not legally formed 
and that they are entitled to the goods to 
be disposed of for their account. The 
American Jewelry Co. petition to have 
the goods turned over to them, and it is 
on this petition that testimony is taken. 
The creditors claim that there is about 
$10,000 worth of goods in the store. The 
company claim that they bought the goods 
for $1,800, and admit they are worth $2,500. 
Yesterday Mr. Overlander, Mrs. Katsch 






’s 


ARNSTEIN BROS. & CO., 

importers and Cutters of 











NEW YORK— 65 Nassau St. LONDON— 29 Ely Place. AMSTERDAM— 12 Tulp Straat. 








34 


THE JEWELERS’ CIRCULAR-WEEKLY. 


February 6, 1901. 


DIAMONDS. 


and Mr. Rogers gave their testimony. Mr. 
Katsch was on the stand. 


Wm. S. Hedges & Co., 

IMPORTERS OF 

Diamonds, other Precious Stones and Pearls. 

DIAMOND JEWELRY. 

170 Broadway, Maiden Lane, New York. 

26 Holborn Viaduct, London. 


Diamonds, Pearls 

AND FINE COLORED STONES. 


FRED. W. LEWIS & CO., 


IMPORTERS AND CUTTERS, 


1 MAIDEN LANE, 
NEW YORK. 




John F. Saunders, 


Cutter and Importer of 


DIAMONDS PRECIOUS STONES. 

FINE PEARLS A SPECIALTY. 

68 Nassau St., cor. John St., i6, NEW YORK. 



*o 


o. 


DIAMONDS 


Pearls, Emeralds, 
Rubies, Sapphires. 


9-13 Maiden Lane, 

NEW YORK. 

PARIS: CHICAGO: 

25 Botilev’d Haussmann. 103 State Street. 


P 

fO. 

.Oj 


4 

4 


New H.wex, Conn., Jan. 30 . — \ suit 
was filed in the City Court yesterday in 
which Deputy Sheriff J. Peter Dejon, of 
New Haven, and Zimmern, Rees & Co. 
and Adolph Goldsmith & Son, New' York, 
are sued by the American Jewelry Co., of 
this city, for $2,500. The plaintiffs seek 
to recover for alleged damage done the 
local company in an attachment proceed- 
ing recently enacted on the store and 
goods of the latter on claims against 
Charles E. Katsch. 


The Case of the Three Men Charged 
with Robbing H. J. Faber. 

Buff.^lo, N. Y., Jan. 31. — Charley 
Greene, 15 years old, Charles C. McClel- 
land, 18 years old, and Arthur Long, 30 
j'ears old, the three men who were arrested 
in Toronto last week on suspicion of be- 
ing the men who stole $600 worth of dia- 
monds from H. J. Faber, jeweler, 43 E. 
Genesee St., were arraigned before Jud.ge 
Murphy in the Police Court yesterday 
on the charge of grand larceny, first 
degree. All three men pleaded not guilty 
and were held for the Grand Jury. 
Since their arrest it has been learned that 
Greene was a parole prisoner of the State 
Industrial School at Rochester. 

McClelland, according to the police, is 
from Toronto and has been in prison ih 
that city. Little is known of Long outside 
of the fact that he was in Central Prison :n 
Toronto a short time ago. 


Settlement Soon of the Estate of the 
Late Charles H. Schiller. 

Utica, R. Y., Jan. 31. — A settlement of 
the estate of the late Charles H. Schiller, 
this city, will be had in a few months, ac- 
cording to a statement by the attorney for 
the creditors. The administratrix has filed 
her account and a citation has been issued, 
returnable on March 18 at the Surrogate’s 
Court. The long delay was necessitated 
by the fact that some few non-resident 
creditors refused to waive service of cita- 
tion or to authorize a local attorney to- 
appear for them. The summons will have 
to be served by publication for six weeks. 

The total receipts amount to $12,806.59. 
The expenses of the administratrix will be 
somewhat large, but will leave a balance 
of about $9,000. The creditors’ aggregate 
claims are $50,414. 


Attempt to Rob the Store of Louis 
Hoffman Miscarries. 

Leavenworth, Kan.. Jan. 30. — An at- 
tempt was made Monday night to rob the 
jewelry store of Louis Hoffman, 111 S 
5th St. Fortunately Hoffman arrived in 
time to scare off the miscreants. As is his 
habit, the jeweler went to the store about 
9 o’clock to light the gas. \Vhen he en- 
tered he saw that the panels in the door 
leading into the alley were cut out and 
the braces were also removed. Strange to 
say the door was locked. The entrance 
made was large enough for a small sized 
man to squeeze through. The supposition 
is that the burglar became frightened at 
the approach of Mr. Hoffman and scurried 
away. 


February 6, 1901. 


THE JEWELERS’ CIRCULAR-WEEKLY. 


35 


Suit Against the Administrator of George 
H. Bonnet. 

Columbus, O., Feb. 2. — The following 
special dispatch appeared in the Ohio State 
Journal this morning from Zanesville: “E. 
H. Bonnet has brought suit against W. S. 
Bell, as administrator of George H. Bon- 
net and, John M. Bonnet, for $10,000, 
which he claims to be due himself and 
other unpreferred creditors of John M. 
Bonnet, who less than two years ago 
transferred his jewelry store and other 
property to George H. Bonnet, it is al- 
leged, to make him, A. H. Bonnet and F. 
F. Bonnet, of Columbus, preferred cred- 
itors, although John M. Bonnet was at 
that time insolvent. He claims the trans- 
fer was illegal.” 


Creditors Accepting the Proposed Settle- 
ment of Albert H. Bonnet. 

Columbus, O., Feb. 1. — More than 80 
per cent, of the creditors of Albert H. Bon- 
net, wholesale jeweler, have already signed 
the proposed agreement for settlement, 
and all the others will within a few days. 
There has been no trouble in the matter 
in any way and all creditors have shown 
a disposition to accept the best offer that 
it was possible for him to make at this 
time. Gnfortunately at present, on the 
advice of his physician, Mr. Bonnet is 
compelled to be absent from home tem- 
porarily. His brother-in-law, William 
Spilman, of Baltimore, is in charge of the 
business in his absence. He will likely not 
be able to return to the city for several 
weeks yet. 


Jeweler Jesse Davidson Accused of 
Falsely Obtaining $5. 

Montgomery, Ala., Jan. 30. — Jesse Dav- 
idson, a jeweler at 17 Commerce St., is un- 
der bail for the Grand Jury on an odd 
charge of obtaining $5 by false pretences. 
E. W. Bray alleges that he went to David- 
son’s place and gave him a gold watch with 
the request that it be melted and made into 
a finger ring. Some time afterward David- 
son gave Bray a ring and Bray paid him $ 0 . 
Later Bray claims that he ascertained that 
Davidson did not have his watch melted, 
but had given him a stock ring and that 
his watch was in Davidson’s store for sale. 

Bray swore out a warrant, charging 
Davidson with obtaining $5 under false pre- 
tences, and at the hearing Davidson de- 
manded a jury trial and gave a $160 bond 
for his appearance before the Grand Jury. 


Meeting of the Creditors of Mrs. Mary 
J. Gifford. 

Mansfield, O., Jan. 31.-^The creditors 
of Mrs. Mary J. Gifford, who has gone into 
voluntary bankruptcy, held their first meet- 
ing, yesterday morning, at the office of 
Charles H. Keating, referee in bankruptcy. 
The assets were given as $3,900 and the 
liabilities at $3,621.69 and there is a farm in 
Missouri owned by Mrs. Gifford. 

Charles W. Chew, who was appointed re- 
ceiver of the stock of jewelry pending the 
meeting of the creditors, was elected the 
trustee. The referee in bankruptcy will ap- 
point appraisers and the stock will be sold 
by the receiver. Mr. Chew gave bond in 
the sum of $3,000. 


ESTATE OF JOHN C. MOUNT. ADDISON W. WOODHULL. 

MOUNT 6 WOODHULL, 

Formerly with late firm of RANOEL, BAREMORE & BILLINGS, 


IMPORTERS OFji .ji^ 


MAKERS OFjiji^ 

FIJSfE 

DIAMOND 

JEWELKY. 


DIAMONDS, 00000000 
OTHER PRECIOUS STONES, 
PEARLS, ETC. 0000000 


26 Maiden Lane 

(Southwest Corner Nassau Street), 

NEW YORK. 


William Kleinschmidt . George H. Howland. Frederick W. Ehrhard. 


^ ^ 



^Pearl 7/^erchants. 

We make a specialty of importing 

FINE, FANCY AND RARE GEMS: 

T^ubies — Emeralds — Sapphires — Colored and Fancy 
Shaped IDianionds. 

189 iSroadwai/f ^ew 2/ork, 


a 

() 


DIAMONDS. 


SAPPHIRES. 


EMERALDS. 


!PopularJ^iffhClass^iamond ^ewelri/, 

^esiffns and Ytstimates burnished. 

H, GATTLE, 7 Maiden Lane, JVeta? York. 

^7/emorandum Orders tSo/tciied. 

RUDIES. OPALS. PEARLS. 


♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦ 
t ♦ 

I Jt/rsA c9 JTt/majif cZZlZW' I 

I 40 •Raider, Xano, ^/amOTZC^S, \ 

♦ NEW YORK. 9 ^ 

♦ ♦ 





THE JEWELERS’ CIRCULAR-WEEKLY. 


February 6, 1901. 


315 


Death of John Mitsch. 

Pittsburgh, Pa.. Jan. 29. — ^Jolin Mitsch. 
aged 66 years, a retired jeweler of Alle- 
gheny, Pa., died at his home. 713 Avery 
St., yesterday, after a three days’ illness 
with grip. Mr. Mitsch was a native of 
Wurtemburg, Germany, and came to 
America with his father. Matthias Mitsch. 
when he was but a child. He started in 
the jewelry business on Federal St.. .Mle- 
gheny. where he continued until he re- 
tired just eight years ago. He was a mem- 
ber of St. Mary’s Roman Catholic Church. 
Allegheny, and of the Knights of St. 
George. He is survived by his widow. 
Mrs. Mary Catherine Mitsch, and two 
sons, John M., of Boston, Mass., connected 
with the Oil Well Supply Co., and Charles 
Mitsch, superintendent of the money orr 


der department in the Allegheny Post 
Office. 


The Composition in the Failure of Tay- 
lor Bros. 

Houston, Tex., Feb. 4. — A hearing on 
the application to confirm the composi- 
tion offered by Taylor Bros., the bank- 
rupt jewelers of this city, will be held to- 
morrow, before Judge J. R. Burnett, ref- 
eree in bankruptcy for the southern divi- 
sion of the eastern district of Texas, at 
his office in the Kiam building. Taylor 
Bros, have offered a composition of ,3(1 
cents on the dollar cash, and a majority 
of the creditors have accepted. 


C. T. Clingenpeel, Augusta, Okla., is 
building a residence and business room. 


importatioas at the Port of New York. 


IVccks Elided Feb. i, igoo, and Feb. t, igor. 


China, Glass and Earthen Ware; 1900. 1901 

China $52,022 $08,091 

Earthen ware 10,425 7,767 

Glass ware 24,059 7,3.51 

Instruments : 

^lusical 22,737 3,259 

Optical 1,174 3,332 

Philosophical 195 

Jewelry, etc.; 

Jewelry 12,034 10,040 

Precious stones 141,424 67,044 

Watches 10,480 5,346 

Metals, etc. ; 

Bronzes 833 225 

Cutlery 20,757 21,147 

Dutch metal 1,075 

Plated ware 179 

Platina 02,809 31,491 

Silver ware 2,450 276 

Miscellaneous; 

Alabaster ornaments 1,244 46 

Amber 1,130 15,887 

Beads 1,603 911 

Clocks 1,262 1,571 

Fans 14.503 3,923 

Fancy goods 14,966 3,909 

Ivory 16,951 

Ivory, manufactures of 665 92 

Marble, manufactures of 20,950 10,170 

Statuary 3,287 5,499 


William Gorfinkel Arrested, Charged with 
Being Implicated in a Theft. 

Hartford, Conn., Jan. 30. — William 
Gorfinkel, a jeweler on Asylum St., 
was arraigned in Court yesterday on a 
charge of being implicated in the theft 
of a $150 diamond, for which crime 
Betty Johnson, a domestic, was ar- 
rested. The Johnson girl admitted 
taking the ring from her employer and 
claimed that Gorfinkel had, for her, sub- 
stituted a paste gem for the real dia- 
mond. She then returned the ring. A 
plea of not guilty was entered by each of 
the accused, and they were held to be tried 
on Monday of next week under a bond of 
$1,000 each. The Gorfinkel arrested is not 
M. Garfinkel. who does business at T28 
State St. 


Death of Edward Carlip. 

Freeport, 111., Jan. 30. — Edward Carlip, 
a pioneer jeweler of this city, died last 
week at his home, 200 Stephenson St., of 
old age and a complication of diseases. 

Mr. Carlip was born in Brandenburg, 
Prussia. Oct. 20, 1818. He was a watch- 
maker by trade and followed his occupa- 
tion for a number of years in Germany. 
In 1853 he came to America. Several 
years later he came west and opened a 
store in Freeport. He was in partnership 
with his brother, and together they con- 
ducted the first jewelry store Freeport 
ever had. In 1876 he retired from active 
business life and the business was then left 
to his brother, who conducted it very suc- 
cessfully until his death in 1881. 


“As an indication of what we are doing 
just now, look at this,” said Manager 
Sperry, of the A. L. Sercomb Co., Chica- 
go, 111., showing a letter asking for prices 
and stating that work done by others in 
that city had not proved satisfactory. 
“They had tried others,” remarked Mr. 
Sperry, “and now that they want good 
work they come to us, because we guar- 
antee all work to be as perfect as heavy 
plate and good workmanship can make it.” 




Timely Advice 


And the best advice we can offer 
is to replenish your depleted stock 
of Diamonds and Diamond jewelry 
NOW. It is not too early. If 
you haven’t the goods to offer, of 
course you cannot make sales, 
but if you make a proper showing 
NOW you will be surprised at the 
extent of your Spring business. 
Besides, it will gain you a reputa- 
tion as a diamond house that will 
be of considerable value to you 
when the busy season begins. In 
the meantime, if you have calls 
for special pieces that you haven’t 
in stock, we can help you. 


Hayden W. Wheeler & Co. 


TWO MAIDEN LANE, N. Y. 

Talaphons, 8 Cortlandt. 

80 HOLBORN VIADUCT, LONDON. 

to 


February 6, 1901. 


THE JEWELERS’ CIRCULAR-WEEKLY. 


37 


Tariff Decisions & Rej>’ulations. 


DUTY ON JAPANESE LUCKY STONES. 

A decision has been rendered by the 
Board of .Appraisers on protests by the 
American Express Co. and Overton & Co., 
against the decision of the Collector of 
Customs at New York, on importations 
of what are known as Japanese lucky 
stones, in which it is decided that these 
articles are dutiable at 45 per cent, under 
Paragraph 112, Act of 1897, and not at 20 
per cent, as imitations of precious stones, 
under Paragraph 435 of the Act. The de- 
cision is as follows: 


PEARLS. 


We find that these protests are against the assess- 
ment of duty at 45 per cent, ad valorem, under the 
provision in paragraph 112, act of July 24, 1897. 
upon articles composed of glass or paste (described 
in the invoices as “stones” and as “rose multy 
color”) of circular, oblong or elliptical form, from 
about a fourth to three-fourths of an inch in diam- 
eter. some of which have double convex faceted 
surfaces and others are cut cabochon — or with one 
convex faceted surface, the other being flat and 
coated with a preparation of bronze powder. They 
are fantastically striped or otherwise ornamented 
in combination multicolors, and do not resemble 
any known precious or semiprecious stone other 
than in their shape and faceted style. The protests 
claim, however, that they are dutiable at 20 per 
cent, ad valorem, under the provision in paragraph 
435 of said act, for “imitations of diamonds or 
other precious stones,” etc. 

It appears from the testimony of one of the im- 
porters that these articles are known as imitation 
Japanese lucky stone*, a variety unknown in com- 
merce or literature as precious or semiprecious 
stones. The same witness also testified that the 
articles are imitation black diamonds, which they 
do not, however, resemble in any essential respect, 
not being black, but of such positive colors as blue, 
green, red and yellow, they appear to be new to 
the trade of this country, having only been intro- 
duced within the past two or three years, and are 
chiefly used by Orientals as settings in jewelry, or 
as charms, talismans, or otherwise. 

The protests are accordingly overruled and the 
assessment of duty attirmed in each case. 


256 Westminster St,, Providence, R. I. 
lO Rue Cadet, Paris. 

Lapidary Works: 93=95 William St,, New York. 


GOODFRIEND BROS., 

P=t1 = I3 Maiden Lane, New York. 



Established 1872. 


A. R0SEMA^, 

MPORTER OF DIAMONDS, 

MAKER OF DIAMOND JEWELRY. 


HEADQUARTERS FOR AMERICAN WATCHES. 

9, 11, 13 Maiden Lane, New York. 


LEO GOLDSMITH, 

Importer of Diamonds and Precious Stones, 


A thief recently broke into the store 
of J. F. Lippincott, Tobias, Neb., and stole 
a quantity of jewelry. Bloodhounds 
tracked him to Ohiowa. 


Removed to 9-M-I3 Maiden Lane, N. Y. 

Room 1305. Telephone, 4115 Cortlandt. 



Importers and Cutters, 


CORNER NASSAU and JOHN STREETS, NEW YORK 


London, 45 Holborn Viaduct 


Amsterdam, 2 Tulp Straat 



THE JEWELERS’ CIRCULAR-WEEKLY. 


February 6, 1901. 


3S 


War Against the Tontine Diamond Com- 
panies of Michigan. 

Detroit, Mich.. Feb. 2. — The State au- 
thorities are apparently determined to 
drive the diamond contract companies out 
of Michigan. A bill has been introduced 
in the Legislature which will prohibit them 
absolutely from doing business in the 
State. The Attorney-General is at work 
under an existing law. This week he filed 
information against the Xew Jersey Ton- 
tine Co., asking for an order from the 
Court to compel them to show by what 
right they take over the contracts of the 
Detroit Tontine Co., and to enter into 
new contracts in the State. The State 
claims these contracts are gambling de- 
vices and are. therefore, both against the 
law and public policy. Proceedings were 


commenced against the Detroit company, 
but they eluded the authorities by being 
absorbed in the New Jersey concern. 

Several suits have been brought by 
policy holders against the Ionia Tontine 
Co. for recovery of money invested in the 
I contracts, and a receiver will probably be 
appointed for the company. 

At Niles, Mich., a large number of in- 
vestors hold contracts in the Diamond 
Contract Co., of Chicago, and a lawyer 
was sent to that city to investigate. He 
reported that the company had not paid 
matured contracts because they could not 
send contracts or checks through themails, 
and were trying to evade an Illinois law. 
However, the Niles people say they would 
be glad to get out with the money they 
have invested. 


American Silver Workers Deported from 
the Dominion of Canada. 

Toronto, Can., Feb. 4.— On the 30th 
ult. three employes of the Toronto Silver 
Plate Co. were deported to the United 
States, from which country they had been 
brought by the company in contravention 
of the provisions of the Alien Labor law. 
The company claim to have acted in good 
faith and to have been unaware that they 
were breaking the law in engaging Ameri- 
can citizens. 

Recent investigations in Toronto by Offi- 
cer Williams, a Dominion official appointed 
to execute the law, have developed a rather 
anomalous condition of things. As in 
another case, he was powerless to order 
deportation because the workmen, though 
engaged in New York, were not American 
citizens. 


Death of William E. Cook. 

Rome, N. Y., Jan, 31. — William E. Cook, 
a well known watchmaker living at 205 * 
Rockwell Ave., this city, died at the City 
Hospital, this morning, of typhoid fever 
complicated with diabetes. The deceased 
was born in Annsville on June 8, 1838, re- 
moving to Rome about 12 years ago. He 
was a watchmaker by trade and plied his 
vocation in various parts of the city. Mr. 
Cook was twice married, his first wife be- 
ing Sarah Ryan, of Lee, and the second 
Mrs. Bernadine Slater, of Utica, whom he 
married on June 26, 1897. The latter and 
six children survive. 


Alleged Diamond Thief Committed. 

B.\ltimore, Md., Jan. 30. — John Smith, 
arrested in Washington, D, C., Jan. 25, 
was given a hearing at the Central Police 
Station, Saturday, on the charge of steal- 
ing a diamond cluster pin from J. Stuart 
MacDonald, jeweler, northeast corner of 
Baltimore and N. Charles Sts. He was com- 
mitted for Court. Smith was captured on 
Pennsylvania Ave., Washington, in com- 
pany with a young woman, who gave her 
name as Mabel Harris, and said her home 
was in Philadelphia. When discovered 
by the detective Smith had about $500 
worth of jewelry, among which were a 
heavy gold chain, two diamond studs, a 
scarf pin and two watch charms, one 
studded with diamonds. 

Smith, the detectives believe, is an ex- 
pert “pennyweight thief,” and their theory 
is sustained by the experience of Mr. 
MacDonald. The woman said she met 
Smith for the first time Friday. He 
represented himself to her as a traveling 
agent for Tiffany & Co. No charge has 
been preferred against Miss Harris, but 
she is held at the Central Police Station to 
await further developments. 

A pawn ticket of a Philadelphia loan 
office was found on Smith, showing that 
he had pawned a diamond pin, a stud and 
a locket in that city. 

Smith also visited the establishment of 
A. Wallenhorst, jeweler, 17 S. Gay St., 
and looked at some rings. 


M. Hulshouser, jeweler, Rockwell City, 
la., has sold out his millinery stock and 
will devote his entire attention to jewelry. 


■f 


4- 

4- 


masterpieces «i 
t X Jeweler’s M. 


CONSISTING OF 


Unique^ Artistic and Original Pieces^ 

all hand-made. 

Set with Perfect Gems^ 

in combinations attractive to every cultivated taste. 

Pendants, Tiaras, Hair Ornaments, 
Pearl Necklaces and Collarettes. 

Rings, in tasteful and rich Mountings. 

Set with Emeralds, Rubies, Sapphires, Opals, 
Turquoises, Olivines, Pearls and Fancy Diamonds. 

Selections sent to responsible Jewelers. 

Order work solicited. 

Our line is now being shown by our representatives on 
the road. 

Cattle, Ettinger&nammel, 

68 NASSAU STREET, NEW YORK. 


4- 


4- 

4- 

■¥ 

4- 

4- 

4- 


1 


4- 

4- 

4- 

4- 

4- 

4- 

4- 

4- 

4 

4- 

4- 

-f 

4- 


4- 

■¥ 

4- 

I 


4- 

■¥ 

4- 

4- 


4- 

4- 

4- 

4 - 

4- 


4- 

4- 


P. O. BOX 2466. 

►4444. 


TEL., 2647 JOHN, 


February u, 19U1. 


THE JEWELERS’ CIRCULAR-WEEKLY. 


39 


Burglars Enter Jewelry Shops in 
Fitzgerald Building. 


EICHBERQ & CO 


• » 


Providence, R. L, Jan. 30. — Burglars 
entered the jewelry shop of Fletcher, Bur- 
rows & Co., Fitzgerald building, 53 Clif- 
ford St., Monday night, and also tried to 
effect an entrance into other shops in the 
same building. They succeeded in getting 
into another shop on the floor below that 
on which Fletcher, Burrows & Co. are lo- 
cated, but seem to have been frightened 
off. The net result of the work of the 
night is a loss of rather less than $100. 

The shop of Fletcher, iBurrows & Co. 
is on the third floor, and the thieves 
climbed the fire escape and easily effected 
an entrance by forcing a window. They 
overlooked a number of valuable packages 
in the office and took one that contained 
five dozen tortoise shell combs, worth 
about $35 or $40.' 

They first went to the jewelry shop of 
William J. Feeley Co., on the floor below, 
where they took nothing but tools. They al- 
so went to the shop of L. J. Roy & Co., on 
the ground floor, but were not able to get in, 
although they used jimmies on the door. 
After that they seem to have left the build- 
ing. The robbery is believed by the police 
to have been the work of amateurs, as it 
was clumsily done. Nothing was missed 
from the shop of Fletcher, Burrows & Co., 
yesterday morning, and it was not until a 
thorough search had been made and an 
accounting of stock taken, that the loss of 
the package of combs was discovered. 
There is no clue to the robbers. 


Incorporation of the William G. Rogers 
Company. 


Importers and Cutters oe 

DIAMONDS, 

65 Nassau Street (Prescou Building), NEW YORIC. 


m^otiis ^Davtci C. '^oivnsGn€i» 

iferesheimer <Sc Co,j 

20 TT^aiden jCanOf 2 /or/cj 

^Diamond ^I^erc/tants. 


“The 

EISENMANN BROS., 


IMPORTERS OF 

Pearl 

FINE ORIENTAL PEARLS, 


Diamonds and Precious Stones, 

nuuoC. 

Paris, 3 Rue St. Georges. 21 & 23 MAIDEN LANE, N. Y. 


CAST YOUR W 

UPON AND INSPECT OUR NEW LINE OF 


Greenfield, Mass., Jan. 31.— Announce- 
ment is made to-day of the issuance of a 
certificate of incorporation under Massa- 
chusetts law to a new concern in this city 
styled the William G. Rogers Co. The 
company are formed for the purpose of 
making and selling silver goods. Their 
capital consists of 100 shares of stock 
valued at $100 each, a total of $10,000. 
William G. Rogers is president, William E. 
Nichols, treasurer, and Herman M. Purdy 
the third member of the directorate. 


PEARL PENDANT MOUNTINGS. 


49 MAIDEN LANE, 
NEW YORK. 


L. ADLER & SON. 


Importers of 
DIAMONDS AND 
PRECIOUS STONES. 


^ 14 Maiden Lane 

(Diamond Exchange Building), 

NEW YORK. 


cu 

z 


< 

& 

o 


U 

S 

=) 

0< 

u 

H 

z 

u 

3 


CATSEYBS 


SAPPHIRES 


DIAMONDS 


RUBIES 


EMERALDS 


PEARLS 


PEARL NECKS 


PEARL ROPES 


O UR stock of Diamonds, Pearls and Precious Stones being the largest 
and best assorted in the trade is specially adapted to the filling of 
regular orders. A well=known feature of our business on which we 
bestow careful attention is the catering for memorandum orders for goods 
which are too expensive to be carried in regular stocks. 

Our goods are insured in transit to any amount. 

Complete stock of Pearl Necks and Pearl Collarettes with Diamond 
Bars. - 

19-20 H.~viadact. JOSEPH FRANKEL’S SONS,«VETv“ol‘r’ 

Telephone, 2733 John. 

FANCY COLORED DIAMONDS and GEMS in PEARLS and PRECIOUS STONES. 


n 

o 


o 


s 


09 

m 


40 


THE JEWELERS’ CIRCULAR-WEEKLY. 


February 0, I'Jbl. 


Alfred H. Smith 6 Co., 


Importers of Gems, 

182 BROADWAY. NEW YORK, 

WILL BUY 

American "Pearls 

THE FINER AND MORE IMPOR= 

TANT THE BETTER. SEND 
THEM TO US. WITH LOWEST 
CASH PRICE, AND WE WILL RE= 

PORT IMMEDIATELY. 

MALLIET, MAXWELL & ROSS, 

Diamond €umr$, 

14 MAIDEN LANE, - - - NEW YORK. 

LONDON, 50 Holborn Viaduct. 

AMSTERDAM, 2 Tulpstraat. 


PATEK, PHILIPPE & CO., swSV 

MAKERS IN THE HIGHEST QUALITY OF 

Fine, Plain, Complicated 

And Decorated Watches 

HAVE ADDED TO THEIR MANY RECOMPENSES AND DISTINCTIONS, 

HORS CONCOURS, 


tegal Proceedings in the Wirschinger 
Bankruptcy. 

Coi.UMBUS, O., Feb. 2. — E. B. Dillon 
has been appointed receiver of the jew- 
elry stock on S. High St., claimed by both 
J. Violet and Frederick Wirschinger, 
the latter having filed a petition in bank- 
ruptcy some time ago. The receiver was 
appointed for Mr. \holet. The receiver 
will continue the business until a trustee 
is chosen. The stock has been somewhat 
depleted by sales without getting in new 
stock, and for this reason the receiver 
was placed under a small bond of 

The Wirschinger bankruptcy matter 
was up before Referee Rogers, Friday, 
on application of Receiver Dillon to sell 
the stock of goods. Both sides agreed 
to allow the sale to proceed and the 
bond was increased to $5,Uh(». Violet, 
who claims that the goods were turned 
over to him in consideration of a loan of 
!?3,.500, has consented to return the store 
and contents to the receiver and share in 
the dividend as a general creditor. The 
Court has appointed T. T. Trees and Wil- 
liam G. Harrington to appraise the goods, 
which are claimed to be worth ab„ut $-■),- 
000 . 


Bold but Unsuccessful Attempt at 
Burglary. 

Se.xttle, Wash., Jan. 30. — Burglars Sun- 
day made a bold but unsuccessful attempt 
to rob a safe containing diamonds and jew- 
elry in the ofifice of Henry Hensel, a manu- 
facturing jeweler, on the third floor of the 
Hinckley block. .\fter forcing out the 
combination knob they were unable to pick 
the combination itself and abandoned the 
job when a few seconds longer would have 
opened the safe. 

Mr. Hensel occupies the entire north- 
eastern corner of the third floor, and the 
burglars made their entrance from the hall 
by prying open the door. They began 
their attack on the safe by attaching 
clamps to the combination knob and tear- 
ing it from its socket, -\fter removing the 
knob, the burglars, with the aid of a steel 
punch and sledgehammer, drove the com- 
bination pin out, e.xposing the combina- 
tion. They then attempted to pick the 
lock, blit were unsuccessful. They left the 
oftice the way in which they had entered, 
leaving most of their tools behind them. 
Mr. Hensel did not visit his oftice until 
late in tlie morning. It required but a few 
minutes to pick the broken lock and open 
the safe door. 


AT THE PARIS EXPOSITION. 

Vest Pocket Directory for Buyers. 25 cents a copy. 

The Jewelers’ Circular Publishing Co. 


Jolm Gannon, formerly employed in the 
factory of the Elgin National M'atch Co., 
Elgin. 111., died recently at a hospital in 
Duluth, Minn., aged 23. The funeral was 
held at Elgin. Thursday. 


AMERICAN aZo ORIENTAL PEARLS 

IMPORTERS OF FINE COLORED STONES AND DIAMONDS. 

ADOLF J. GRINBER6 CO., 

' *»• h:.S , ; 0 


8 MAIDEN LANE, NEW YORK. 





February 6, 1901. 


THE JEWELERS’ CIRCULAR-WEEKLY. 


41 


Death of Louis Gutmann 

Cincinnati, O., Feb. 2. — Louis Gutmann. 
a pioneer wholesale jeweler of Cincinnati, 
died of heart trouble at his residence, at 4 
o’clock A.M., Friday, Feb. 1, aged 62 years. 



He had just returned from a few days at 
French Lick Springs and was, to all ap- 
pearance, in the best health, being actively 
engaged in his business up to half past 
five o’clock the evening before. 

Mr. Gutmann was born in Germany, com- 
ing to this country at the age of 15 years 
and settling at Rochester, N. Y., where he 
learned the jewelry business. He came to 
Cincinnati in 1865, going into the jobbing 
business and traveling for himself. He 
married the sister of A. G. Schwab, sub- 
sequently taking Mr Schwab into partner- 
ship with him. Later Mr. Schwab with- 
drew from the firm, and with his brother, 
Moses, they went into business for them- 


selves, Mr. Gutmann continuing under the 
name of L. Gutmann until about two 
years ago, when he admitted his two elder 
sons, David J. and Elias, and the firm be- 
came L. Gutmann & Sons. 

Air. Gutmann was all his life an exact 
and conscientious man, exercising these 
virtues daily. He was an upright man 
himself and he required others to be so as 
well. He was held in high esteem by 
manufacturers and jobbers east and west, 
and was prominent in commercial and 
social circles in his own city. He expected 
to shortly retire from active business and 
enjoy the competence he had accumu- 
lated. by thrift in the years gone by. For 
the past quarter of a century he has occu- 
pied the same quarters. 

He leaves a widow and six children — 
David J., Elias, Airs. Emma Alarks, Airs. 
Louise Wellhouse, of Atlanta, Aliss Lillian 
and Solomon. The wedding of his daughter 
Lillian was announced to take place next 
month, and he was interested in making 
unusual preparations for it, as she was 
his last daughter to leave home. 

The Cincinnati jewelers who began their 
business career with the house of L. Gut- 
mann were: A. G. Schwab, Aloses Schwab, 
Messrs. Bene and Lindenberg, Louis Al- 
bert, Henry Hahn and Jacob Frohman. 
while a number of out of town jewelers 
emanated from this house. 

A meeting of the Cincinnati Wholesale 
Jewelers’ Association was held at the Gib- 
son Hou^e on Friday morning, Feb. 1, to 
take appropriate action upon the death 
of one of their most respected members, 
Louis Gutmann. E. Croninger, president 
of the Association, was in the chair. Rep- 


resentatives of the following firms were in 
attendance: Fox Bros. & Co., A. G. 

Schwab & Bro., Joseph Noterman & Co., 
Herman & Loeb, John Holland Gold Pen 
Co., Duhme Bros. & Co., Frohman & Co., 
Bene, Lindenberg & Co., Peck, Selmeier 
& Peck, P. Henry, the Wadsworth Watch 
Case Co., Albert Bros., C. Oskamp, Dorst 
& Co. and E. Croninger. John Holland, 
J. Frohman and H. C. Walton were ap- 
pointed as a committee to draft resolu- 
tions of condolence and reported the fol- 
lowing, which were unanimously adopted: 
Whereas, It has pleased Almighty God to re- 
move from our midst our fellow member, Louis 
Gutmann; and, 

Whereas, Mr. Gutmann was for many years 
prominent in the wholesale jewelry trade of Cin- 
cinnati; and, 

Whereas, He was honest in all his transactions, 
and energetic and aggressive in his business; and, 
W'hekeas, His exemplary character has left an 
enviable reputation behind him; therefore. 

Be it Resolved, That the sincere sympathy of the 
Wholesale Jewelers’ Association of Cincinnati be 
extended to the members of his bereaved family. 
His long life was crowned with success. 

He was faithful to every trust reposed in him. 
Further Resolved, That these resolutions be spread 
upon the minutes of this Association and a copy 
thereof be properly engrossed and sent to the fam- 
ily of our deceased member. 

H. C. Walton, Chairman, 
John Holland, 

Jacob Frohman, 

Committee. 

It was further resolved that the Associa- 
tion attend in a body the funeral services 
of A'lr. Gutmann, to be held upon the af- 
ternoon of Sunday, Feb. 3. As represent- 
ing the Association the following gentle- 
men were selected as honorary pal bearersr 
A. Herman, J. Frohman, S. AI. Peck, Her- 
man Duhme, H. C. Walton and William 
Pflueger. 



FREUND 

I Known to the Trade for 36 Years 

From Maine to the Gulf, 

From the Atlantic to the Pacific, 

the name of 



FREUND 

has been known for 36 years as a synonym for fair an( 
square dealing, for carrying attractive goods and for selling 
them at prices which afford jewelers a good profit. Our facilities 1 
and energies have been especially directed towards the 
improvement and development of our line of jewelry, 
and we strive constantly to preserve and ex- 
tend our established reputation as 



HENRY FREUND & BRO., 

9-13 Maiden Lane, New York. 


The Jewelry House 



42 


•THE JEWELERS’ CIRCULAR-WEEKLY. 


February 6, 1901. 


Another Large Jewelers’ Building Pro- 
posed for Maiden Lane. 

A modern office building to be erected 
on the southeast corner of Broadway and 
Maiden Lane, New York, in place of the 
building now there, including 2 Maiden 
Lane and 170 Broadway, which was re- 
ferred to in The Circular-Weekly two 
weeks ago, will be a certainty. Plans are 
being prepared, and the title to the prop- 
erty was passed yesterday from Ehrich 
Parmly to the new Broadway Building Co. 
The building will have a frontage of 88 feet 
on the Lane and 76 feet on Broadway; will 
be 18 stories high, and will be planned and 
built entirely for the jewelry trade. The 
deal is said to be the largest ever effected 
in the downtown district, involving $2,200,- 
000, including the cost of the land and the 
new building. 

The work of removing the present build- 
ings will begin on May 1. Architects Clin- 
ton & Russell are now preparing the plans, 
and agreements have already been made 
with the George A. Fuller Co. for the con- 
struction of the building at a contract price 
of $900,000. The new skyscraper will have 
two entrances, one on BroadvVay and one 
at 2 Maiden Lane, and its elevators will 
be five in number. 

The building will be ready for occupancy 
on April 1, 1902. Leasing of space has 
progressed at a very promising rate, 25 
per cent, of the floor space having already 
been leased or engaged. Three corpora- 
tions, the names of which are withheld, 
will occupy the lower part of the building. 
The corner on the ground floor wilf have 


as a tenant a well known National 
bank of New York. South of the main 
entrance, on Broadway, a trust com- 
pany, now being organized, will have 
their offices, and the basement will be 
specially constructed in view of the fact 
that it has already been secured by a safe 
deposit company. 

This safe deposit company will cater 
especially to the jewelry trade, and pro- 
vision will be made by which one elevator 
will be run direct into the vault com- 
partment from the floors above. Among j 
the firms who are expected to be quartered | 
in the new building are: Ailing & Co., | 

\V. S. Hedges & Co. and G. J. Smith & 
Co., now at 170 Broadway. 

The purchasers of the property are a syn- 
dicate. headed by Stewart Browne, of Stew- 
art Browne & Co., bankers. Title has 
been taken by the Broadway Building 
Co., of which Mr. Browne is president. 
The property has frontages of 76.7 feet on 
Broadway and 88.10 feet on Maiden Lane. 
The plot originally owned by Mr. Parmly 
fronted 76.7 feet on Broadway and 67.10 
feet on IMaiden Lane. He, however, ac- 
quired the small adjoining structure, 2 
Maiden Lane, 21 by 88.4, and the new 
building site was conveyed by him to 
the Broadway Building Co. as one par- 
cel, for a consideration of $1,300,000. 
The building may be called the “Broad- 
way Building,” but this point is not yet 
settled. 


George S. Ac’ams, optician, is to open 
a new jewelry store at Saratoga, Wyo. 


Incorporation of the Kursh-Pickering 
Co. 

Newark, N. J., Feb. 1. — The Kursh- 
Pickering Co. have been incorporated in 
this city, to manufacture jewelry, with a 
capital of $50,000, divided into 500 shares. 
The incorporators are Frank Kursh, New- 
ark; George F. Kursh, Philadelphia, and 
David B. Pickering, East Orange, who 
have altogether subscribed $30,000. The 
Kursh-Pickering Co. have purchased the 
entire interests of the Shoemaker-Picker- 
ing Co., Newark, and will succeed that 
concern in the manufacture of fine jewelry. 

The three members of the new company 
are all well known in the jewelry trade; 
Frank Kursch was for many years 
practically the head of the firm of Pearce, 
Kursh & Co., Philadelphia, and one of the 
best known manufacturers of fine jewelry 
in the trade; David B. Pickering has for 
the past two years been managing bcth 
the practical and financial ends of the Shoe- 
maker-Pickering Co., and George F. 
Kursh is now managing the business in 
Philadelphia and wilTsoon take charge cf 
the works of the new organization. The 
Kursh-Pickering Co. have more than 
doubled the facilities of the plants which 
they have taken over and have added 
many and varied machines for the pro- 
duction of new and perfect lines of jewelry. 
The new company will occupy an entire 
floor at 23 Marshall St., Newark, and ex- 
pect soon to open a branch office in New 
York. 


Candrup Bros, have closed their jewelry 
business at Huxley, la., and vacated. 


New York, U.S. A., 

No. 100 William Street. 


Birmingham, England, 

King Alfred’s Place. 


Liege, Belgium, 

Boulevard D’Avroy, 118. 


London, England, 

No. 34 Holborn Viaduct. 


SAM’L BUCKLEY & CO., 

Commission Merchants. 


We beg to announce that we have opened an office at No. 34 Holborn Viaduct, 
London, E. C., England, for the convenience of American purchasers of EUROPEAN 
SILVERWARE, CLOCKS, POTTERIES, PRECIOUS STONES, ETC. 

The situation of this office (corner of Holborn Viaduct and Holborn Circus) 
affords an unobstructed north light that is unequaled in the district for the examina- 
tion of DIAMONDS AND PRECIOUS STONES. 

At our New York office, No. 100 William Street, we have designs and representa- 
tive pieces of silver and silver plate (reproductions of old Sheffield styles), manufactured 
by such houses as Wm. Corny ns & Sons, Hukin & Heath and Wm. Hutton & Sons, for 
whom we act as sole United States agents. 

We are also sole agents for the silver and metal work made b}^ the London Guild 
of Handicraft, under the supervision of C. R. Ashbee. 

SAM’L BUCKLEY & CO. 


February 6, 1001. 


THE JEWELERS’ CIRCULAR-WEEKLY. 


43 


Death of Joseph B. Bowden. 

The sad news that Joseph B. Bowden, 
head of the firm of J. B. Bowden & Co., 
ring manufacturers, 1 Maiden Lane, New 
York, and one of the most popular jewelers 
in the entire trade, had died at his resi- 
dence, 235 Gates Ave., Brooklyn, reached 
the jewelry trade of New York, Saturday, 
and caused universal grief and regret. Mr, 
Bowden’s death was not wholly unexpect- 
ed, as he had been ill at his home since 



THE LATE JOSEPH B. BOWDEN. 

Nov. 5, at which time he was suddenly 
stricken, while talking with a representative 
of The Circular-Weekly, at the head- 
quarters of the Jewelers’ McKinley and 
Roosevelt Club, 10 Maiden Lane. Mr. 
Bowden was taken to his office at the time 
and a physician summoned, and later taken 
in a cab to his home, where he gradually 
grew weaker until the end came Saturday 
morning. 

In the passing of Mr. Bowden the jew- 
elry trade of New York loses one of its 
most conspicuous, prominent and popular 
merchants, a man whose open hearted, 
generous and whole souled disposition 
caused him to be known and loved by all 
his associates, business and personal. Evi- 
dences of the esteem and love which his 
fellow-merchants had for him are to be 
found on every hand; two notable in- 
stances being the special resolution passed 
at the last annual meeting of the Jewelers’ 
League, wishing him a speedy recovery, 
and the special toast drunk to his health 
at the annual banquet of the Jewelers’ As- 
sociation and Board of Trade, Jan. 16. 

In the work of the jewelry trade Mr. 
Bowden was a most conspicuous figure. 
He was president of the Jewelers’ Security 
Alliance; was for years vice-president of 
the Jewelers’ League; was president of the 
New York Jewelers’ Association in 1894; 
was a director in the Jewelers’ Association 
and Board of Trade; was a director in the 
Chatham National bank and for many 
years had been president of the Jewelers’ 
Republican organization during the Presi- 
dential campaigns. Mr. Bowden was also 
the choice of the jewelry trade for the posi- 
tion of Commissioner to the Paris Exposi- 


tion, the petition to President McKinley 
asking for his appointment being signed 
by jewelers in all parts of the country. 

Joseph Benjamin Bowden came of En- 
glish ancestry on both sides of the house. 
Some of the Bowdens of earlier genera- 
tions were prominent in Colonial affairs. 
One of his ancestors was Thomas Bowden, 
an officer of the British army, who served 
with distinction in the French and Indian 
War. His father, Joseph Bowden, was a suc- 
cessful jeweler, and from him Mr. Bowden 
naturally acquired his liking for the trade. 
The son of Joseph and Charlotte Bowden, 
Joseph Benjamin Bowden was born in the 
then city of Brooklyn, N. Y., on Jan. 10. 
1852. His parents moved to Flushing, N. 
Y., in 1854. He received a good practical 
academic education in the local schools and 
in the Flushing Institute, Flushing, N. Y. 
Then he entered upon the business in 
which his father had long been engaged. 

At an early age Mr. Bowden was taken 
into partnership with his father. That was 
in 1873-74, the firm bearing, however, sim- 
ply the name of Joseph Bowden. From 1874 
to 1878 Mr. Bowden was the head of the 
establishment of J. B. Bowden. From 1886 
to the present time he had been senior 
partner of the firm of J. B. Bowden & Co., 
manufacturing jewelers, with offices at the 
corner of Maiden Lane and Broadway. 
Mr. Bowden’s time had been pretty stead- 
ily given to business, so that he had 
none to give to office seeking, though he 
had long taken an active interest in politi- 
cal affairs as a Republican. 

iMr. Bowden made his home in Brook- 
lyn and was largely identified with the so- 
cial life of that part of the metropolis. He 
was a member of several of the leading 
clubs of Brooklyn, including the Crescent, 
Union League, Lincoln and Atlantic Yacht 
clubs. He was also a member of the Ma- 
sonic order, belonging to Acanthus Lodge. 
F. and A. M., and the Aurora Grata Scot- 
tish Rite Organization. He was married 
on May 14, 1874, to Miss Alice M. Jaggar, 
and his widow and three children, Joseph 
L. Bowden, Laurens R. Bowden and Alice 
R. Bowden, survive him. 

The directors of the Jewelers’ Associa- 
tion and Board of Trade held a special 
meeting Monday morning and adopted the 
following resolutions on the death of Mr. 
Bowden: 

The Board of Directors of the .Jewelers’ Asso- 
ciation and Board of Trade, having been notified 
of the death of their associate and fellow member, 
Joseph B. Bowden, and desiring to give expression 
to the profound sorrow felt by every member of 
the organization, order the following resolutions 
to be spread upon the records of the organization 
and instruct the secretary to transmit a copy 
thereof to the family of the deceased: 

Resolved, That in the death of Joseph B. Bowden 
the jewelry trade of the entire country has lost 
one of its most eminent men. By his faithful 
work as president of the Jewelers’ Security Al- 
liance, vice-president of the Jewelers’ League and 
director in the Jewelers’ Association and Board 
of Trade he contributed in no slight degree to 
the welfare of these organizations and to making 
them what they are to-day — successful co-operative 
trade institutions. No higher tribute can be paid 
to his memory than to say that his personal char- 
acter, his sterling integrity, his faithful work in 
the responsible positions to which he was called 
makes us proud to remember that he was a jew- 
eler; an honor to the trade he chose as his life 
work. And while bowing to the will of Almighty 
God in bringing to a close the earthly career of 
our friend, we give expression to our sorrow, 
deeply sympathizing with the family bereaved, 
whose loss is so much greater than our own. 


Resolved, That the Board of Directors attend the 
funeral services in a body, and as a further mark 
of respect, this meeting do now adjourn. 


At a special meeting of the executive 
committee of the Jewelers’ Security Alli- 
ance, held Feb. 4, the following pre- 
amble and resolutions were unanimously 
adopted: 

Whereas, We have learned with deep sorrow of 
the demise of our esteemed president, Mr. Joseph 
B. Bowd-en. Therefore, be it. 

Resolved, that as a last tribute of our respect to 
our deceased friend and colleague, we record our 
high appreciation of his sterling qualities and no- 
ble character, who by his genial manners and 
strict integrity attained a prominent position as a 
useful and public spirited citizen and an able and 
upright merchant. We deplore the loss of his wise 
counsel and shall ever remember with profound 
gratitude the valuable services he has rendered 
this trade on many occasions, and we shall never 
forget his unselfish activity in the interest of this 
Alliance and the fidelity with which he discharged 
his duties as its president. 

Be it further Resolved, That we tender the heart- 
felt sympathy of this Board to his bereaved family 
and that the members attend the funeral services 
and that a copy of these resolutions be sent to Mr. 
Bowden’s family. 


Leopold Stern, 

2d Vice-President, 
PI. PI. Butts, 

3d Vice-President, 
Bernard Karsch, 

Treasurer, 
James H. Noyes, 

Secretary, 


F. Kroeeer, 

Charles F. Wood, 
Augustus K. Sloan, 
Henry Abbott, 

C. C. Champenois, 

Committee. 


IMPRESSIVE FUNERAL CEREMONIES OVER 
THE REMAINS OF MR. BOWDEN. 


So many relatives, personal friends, 
business associates and Masonic brothers 
of Joseph B. Bowden attended his funeral 
Monday evening, at his late residence^ 235 
Gates Ave., Brooklyn, that the house 
was crowded from basement up. The par- 
lors and dining room were thrown into 
one large room for the services, but there 
was not space for more than half the people 
at one time. It was, therefore, necessary 
to divide the funeral ceremonies. First 
came the regular Episcopal service, con- 
ducted by Rev. Dr. Backus, of the Church 
of the Incarnation; then the members of 
the family and immediate friends passed 
upstairs to give room for the members of 
Acanthus Lodge, F. & A. M., who came 
up from the basement and formed in front 
of the casket, which was placed at the base 
of a beautiful bank of elaborate floral trib- 
utes from the directors of the Jewelers’ 
Security Alliance, Jewelers’ Association 
and Board of Trade, Lincoln Club and 
other organizations and individuals. 

The Masonic ceremonies were conducted 
impressively and eloquently by Past Master 
L. E. Bomeisler, of Acanthus Lodge, at 
the particular request of Mr. Bowden, 
made before his death. Prayer by Rev. Dr. 
Backus concluded the services. The body 
was placed temporarily in a receiving vault 
at Greenwood cemetery, Tuesday, and 
will be interred there later. 

Among the many prominent men con- 
nected with the trade who were present 
were: President George M. Hard and di- 

rector Daniel J. Carroll, of the Chatham 
National bank; president C. G. Alford, O. 
G. Fessenden, Charles F. Wood, C. E. 
Hastings, P. T. Tunison, of the Jewelers’ 
Association and Board of Trade; H. H. 
Butts, of the Jewelers’ Security Alliance; 
William Bardel and John R. Greason. of 
the Jewelers’ League; William Smith, of 
William Smith & Co. 


44 


THE JEWELERS’ CIRCULAR-WEEKLY. 


February (i, 19Ul. 


The 20 Per Cent. Duty on Drilled Pearls 
Again Affirmed. 

The ’2h per cent, duty on. drilled pearls 
has again been atiinned by the United 
States Circuit Court, this time by Judge 
Coxe. in a decision handed down Saturday, 
affirming the decision of the Board of Gen- 
eral Appraisers in the second suit by- 
Charles L. Tiffany. 

The Collector classified the pearls under 
Section (i of the Act of July', 1897, and as- 
sessed a duty of '20 per cent, ad valorem 
as "articles manufactured, in whole or in 
part." The importer protested that they 
should have been classified under Para- 
graph 436 of said Act, and subjected to 
an ad valorem duty of 10 per cent, as 
“pearls in their natural state, not strung 
or set." 

Judge Coxe cites the previous case of Tif- 
fany against the United States, 103 Fed. 
Rep. 619. in which it is held that pearls 
with holes drilled through them by skilled 
labor are not “pearls in their natural state.’’ 
The Government in.-iists that the resem- 
blance of the articles is greater to “pearls 
set and strung," as provided for by Para- 
graph 434 of the Act, than to “pearls in 
their natural state." as provided for by 
Paragraph 436. Wdth this view Judge 
Coxe’s decision coincides. The following 
interesting testimony was given by wit- 
nesses: “The Chinese, as well as the East 
Indians, drill very- many pearls for con- 
venience in carrying and handling them. 
Pearls come into the London and French 
markets in bunches, where they are strung 
for convenience, and the bunches are 
joined together with a silver threa 1. * *" 


In the salient part of his decision. Judge 
Coxe says: 

“The Court is clearly of the opinion that the im- 
ported pearls bear a clo.ser resemblance to strung 
pearls than to pearls in their natural state. That 
this ruling may result in hardship is a contention 
which should be addressed not to the judicial, hut 
to the legislative branch of the Government. The 
decision of the Board is affirmed.’’ 


Interview with the Advocates of Assem- 
bly Bill No. 167. 

A Circul.\r-Weekly representative in- 
terviewed attorney C. S. Andrews, repre- 
senting the New York State IMedical So- 
ciety, which is pushing Assembly bill No. 
107, against which the optical societies of 
the State are fighting, to obtain from him 
an idea of what the physicians propose to 
do, Mr. .\ndrews mentioned the changes 
in the bill as originally presented by Mr. 
Bell, which are recorded elsewhere in this 
paper, and said that “the framers of the 
bill take the position that by the amended 
wording the patent medicine trade is not 
interfered with, nor is any change made 
in the attitude of the law toward the phar- 
maceutical trade. The matter of the op- 
position of the opticians towards the bill, 
lias not, so far as I know, been brought 
before the medical society, and hence no 
action has been taken on this point." 

An informal conference between Dr. 
■Nelson H. Henry, a member of the As- 
sembly Committee on Public Health, ana 
representatives of the patent medicine and 
pharmaceutical associations was held Sun- 
day, and the optical organizations would 
have been represented but for a misunder- 
standing as to the place of meeting. 


NOTICE. 


We are now delivering two new. 


“RAILROAD WATCHES” 

in 17-jeweled and 21=jeweled grades. Write to us for prices and. 
information. Orders will be filled in rotation. 

Our Watches Pass Inspection. 

WE ARE THE LARGEST DISTRIBUTORS OF 

DUEBER-HAMPDEN WATCHES 

IN AMERICA. 

Our MOLLY STARKS and our 12-SIZE WATCHES are Sellers. 
Write to us to-day, any day. 



Maiden Lane, New York. 




I Continued Examination into the Affairs 
of M. J. Davidow. 

The examination into the affairs of ^f. 
J. Davidow, bankrupt jobber, formerly at 
•MO Broadway, New York, was continued. 
Thursday, before Referee in Bankruptcy 
Miller. Air. Davidow was examined by 
attorney G. H. Crawford in detail as to the 
purchaise and disposition of the silver ware, 
watches, jewelry and other goods bought 
just previous to the failure. He did not 
take kindly to the lawyer's questions and it 
was only through considerable trouble on 
the part of Air. Crawford and the referee 
that reasonably satisfactory answers could 
be obtained. Davidow said he kept no 
complete set of books and did not keep any 
record of dealings on a cash basis, as a 
rule. Neither did he keep a record of 
goods received or money paid out. He 
did make entries of • all goods sold on 
credit. 

He testified that he went to New York 
from Scranton, Pa., in 1896, and had no 
business for a time. Then he was at 92 
Bowery, manufacturing patent gas lamp 
mantles, but he sold out. Then he had an 
office at 320 Broadway and was in the 
money loaning business for about six 
months, the first part of 1898. In Octobe', 
1898, he was at 114-116 Canal St., where 
* he was in business a year and three-quar- 
j ters. On Jan. 1.7. 1900, he began business 
at .510 Broadway. He had been handling 
diamonds and jewelry for about 18 years. 

Davidow was cpiestioned regar ’ing a biil 
of \V. I. Rosenfeld for 2.5 solid gold watch 
cases amounting to $406. He said part was 
sold and part left in the store “in a paste- 
board box on a shelf, as usual.” A bill 
for three unmounted diamonds, $.521. 
bought of J. R. Wood & Sons, was shown. 
Davidow said he received the stones and 
put them in a drawer in the original papers. 

; He didn’t know whether he locked the 
i drawer or not. Attorney Crawford thought 
these instances showed a peculiar way of 
caring for valuab e goods, but Davidow as- 
I sured him it was his usual way, as he ha 1 
no safe. The examination will he con- 
tinued this afternoon. 


I Jewelers' Gold Bars Withdrawn and Ex- 
changed. 


IVcck Ended Feb. 2. 1901. 
The U. S. Assay Office report: 
Gold bars e.xchanged for gold coin... 
Gold bars paid depositors 


$218,682 90 
47.105 17 


Total *265,788 07 

Of this the gold bars exchanged for gold com are 
reported bv the Sub-Treasury as follows: 

Tan. 28,...'. 

■ 29 ol,oi2 

2.397,443 

.. ',1 45.979 




Total .. $2,598,078 

Of this sum over $2,:!00.000 was withdrawn for 
export. 


The fire which destroyed the Frankel 
department store, Des Moines, la., Jan. 
29, caused a loss estimated at $8,969 to 
the jewelry stock of Henry Plumb. , 

The store of A. H. Furstnow, Fond du 
Lac, Wis., is to have extensive improve- 
ment.s made. An elevated office will be 
constructed in the rear of the store. 


February 6 , 1901. 


THE JEWELERS’ CIRCULAR-WEEKLY. 


45 


PRIZE=WINNING WINDOWS IN THE 

SIMMONS CHAINS WINDOW DISPLAY CONTEST. 

The list of prize winners in this contest was published in 
“The Jewelers’ Circular=Weekly” of Jan. 23. We show here re= 
productions of the windows which won second and third prizes. 



THE SECOND PRIZE of $50 was 
awarded Chris. Bernloehr, Indi= 
anapolis, Ind. 

This window display used a row 
of little maniRins, each wearing 
a watch and chain. In the cen= 
ter was a card bearing the sen= 
tence : “We All Wear Simmons 
Chains.” In the center of the 
window was a large sunburst of 
several dozen chains radiating 
from a card which bore the 
figure of Father Time and the 
legend, “ Tested by Time.” This 
was flanked on either side by 
additional displays. 


THE THIRD PRIZE 
of $25 was awarded 
Wm.H.Rollman, Mif= 
flintown. Pa. The 
photographic repro= 
duction is rather un= 
satisfactory, but it 
will be seen that the 
bottom and bacR= 
ground were draped 
loosely with white 
material on which 
were arranged clus= 
ters of jewelry, chief 
among which were 
Simmons Chains in 
festoons and on 
cards. The three 
Simmons window 
cards were enhanced 
by a frame of color 
contrasting with the 
background. 



|5;inHA' 


iMMON: 

CHAINS 


lCHRISTH, 


K. F. SIMMONS CO., Attleboro, Mass. 




rtp 


46 


THE JEWELERS’ CIRCULAR-WEEKLY. 



Traveling representatives < 
may consider these colnmns | 
open for the pablication o^ I 
any news or items of inter- j 
est regarding themselves or 
their confreres. 

A. S. Alfred, trav- 
eler for George B. 
Hurd & Co., New 
York, is making a 
trip west accompan- 
ied by his wife. 

E. S. Villinoare, tra- 
veler for the Norton- 
Paulson Jewelry Co., Kansas City, iUo., left last 
week for an extended trip through Texas. 

Chester G. Hall and Samuel Hall, travelers for 
Albert Gerwig, Pittsburgh, Pa., started out on 
Monday on their second trip this year, the former 
into West ^■irginia and Ohio and the latter west- 
ward. 

Dory A. Smith, for the W. J. Johnston Co., 
Pittsburgh, Pa., started out on Monday for a six 
weeks’ trip. ilr. Smith carries the largest stock 
of watch cases, movements and fine jewelry ever 
taken from this city. 

The Indianapolis, Ind., jobbers had few callers 
last week. They were: Mr. Hirsch, Hirsch, Flash- 
ner & Robbins; N. Gunzburger, L. & M. Kahn 
& Co.; E. E. Stockton, The E. Ingraham Co.; 
Mr. Cutter, The Elgin National Watch Co. 

H. S. Hurlbut, formerly with the Non-Retailing 
Co., Lancaster, Pa., is now connected with the 
wholesale house of the W. J. Johnston Co., Pitts- 
burgh, Pa., and will start out in a couple of weeks, 
covering Ohio, West \’irginia, Indiana, Michigan 
and the northwest. 


David Stone & Son, jobbers in jewelry, 534 
Broadway, New York, have engaged Mortimer 
Hecksher, formerly with Solomon Bros. & Gross, 
to represent them in the New England States, 
and E. J. Kennedy to cover New York State and 
Pennsylvania. Their travelers start on the road 
this week. 

Paul Wettstein, son of George Wettstein, manu- 


facturing jeweler, Cedar Rapitls, la., started on 
his maiden trip on the road for that house last 
Monday. He is 18 years of age and has been in 
the office with the firm for two years. He sold 
his first bill in the same town and to the same 
man that his father sold his fir.st bill, over 25 
years ago, when he started to travel for a Chicago 
house, ilr. Wettstein’s son, Frank, who has been 
traveling for him in Iowa, Kansas and Nebraska, 
is at present in the City of Mexico for his health. 

Traveling men calling on Davenport, la., jewel- 
ers the past week were: K. H. Clarke, Towle 

Mfg. Co.; E. B. Frank, The Pairpoint Corpora- 
tion; M. A. Gluck, Otto Young & Co.; C. M. 
Davis, .-Cnsonia Clock Co.; Henry Klaas, S. 
Glickauf & Co. ; I. Keasler, Aurora Silver Plate 
Mfg. Co.; G. W. Wile, Buffalo Jew'elry Case Co.; 
John G. Ilodgens, Geneva Optical Co.; A. N. 
Brittan. .\I. A. ^lead & Co.; Norman L. Strauss, 
Louis Kaufman & Co.; Thomas W. Agnew, New 
Haven Clock Co.; Ernest A. Leigh, Wilcox Sil- 
ver Plate Co.; J. C. Baer, Keystone Mfg. Jew- 
elry Co. and representative of Electric City Box 
Co. 

The travelers w'ho called on the Kansas City, 
Mo., trade last week were; J. W. Stoneburner, 
Ford & Carpenter; G. A. Jewett, Hamilton & 
Hamilton, Jr.; Lucien Rockwell, Poole Silver 
Co.; M'illiam T. Smith, Wilcox Silver Plate Co.; 
Mr. Wolf, for Eisler & Laubheim; J. M. Friede, 
Eisenstadt Mfg. Co.; Frank R. Horton, Carter, 
Hastings & How'e; J. O. Slemmons, J. B. Bow- 
den & Co.; Arthur W. Ware; George D. Gruen, 
I). Gruen & Sons; A. J. Sherrard, Enos Rich- 
ardson & Co.; F. W. Agnew', New Haven Clock 
Co.; Jules Franklin, L. Tannenbaum & Co., L. 
M. Frank, S. Valfer & Co.; E. Lange, P. W. 
Lambert & Co. ; H. E. Osborne, general agent 
for O. F. Egginton; I. W. Friedman; J. S. Adler, 
J. S. Adler & Co. ; W. S. Sparrow, Stem Bros. 
& Co.; N. O. Barnhill, Langsdorf-Byers Jewelry 
Co. 

Travelers an Pittsburgh. Pa., last week were: 
F. C. Somes, S. O. Bigney & Co.; Mr. Platt, 
Theodore W. Foster & Bro. Co.; Edwin L. Mum- 
ford, Waite, Thresher Co.; James O. Otis, Harvey 
& Otis; Fred. Clarkson, Albert Lorsch & Co.; 
Jacob Schorsch, I. Emrich & Co.; William Rosen- 
berger, A. Wallach & Co.; Mr. Bleecker, William 
S. Hedges & Co.; Mr. Rogers. N. E. Whiteside 
& Co.; P. M. Layman, Riker Bros.; F. D. New- 
burger, R. Blackinton & Co.; C. F. Brinck, The 
Crescent Watch Case Co.; F. D. Smith, Reeves 
& Browne; S. W. Pickering, Allen & Jonassohn; 
Walter S. Strauss, Jacob Strauss & Sons; J. W. 
Armbruster, Illinois Watch Co. ; W. H. Gregory, 
Strobell & Crane; Mr. Parker, Osmun-Parker Mfg. 
Co.; II. A. Bliss, Krementz & Co.; Fred. L. 
Baker, The Non-Retailing Co. and Ehlers & Co. 

The following travelers made the Twin Cities 


February G, 1901. 


the past week: M. Lampert, Henry Zimmern & 
Co.; Mr. I^ndy, S. Valfer & Co.; C. S. -Mitchell, 
for A L. Silberstem; II. L. Stanton; I. C. Nichol- 
son, Flint, Blood & Co.; Mr. Boice, Royce, Boice 

ri u U' J- S. Adler & Co.; O. H. 

Hull, The Pairpoint Corporation; A. Kiersky A 
& Co.; R. H. Shailer, The E. .\. Welch 
.Mfg. Co.; II. B. Kennion, Parks Bros. & Rogers- 
-Mr. Weiser, Heintz Bros.; B. W. Raymond! 
-\urora Silver Plate Mfg. Co.; Frank Thompson! 
Derby Stiver Co.; and representative of F A 
Hardy & Co. 

The following traveling men called on the trade 
in Columbus, O., within the past two weeks- 
William Seckels; E. A. Rose, Weigle & Rose- E 
S. & S. Druiff; M. Klipper, Hipp! 
Oidisheim Sc Bxo.; Julius F. Shuman, for W’illiam 
Kmscherf; G. C. Ridgway, Julius King Optical 
Co.; F. A. Perry, The John Russell Cutlery Co 
M. L. Barnard, J. B. Bowden & Co.; C. J. Roehr 
Bassett Jewelry Co.; Mr. Crane, Mandeville, Car 
row & Crane; E. C. Stone, Battin & Co. ; R P 
Coughlin, Wm. L. Gilbert Clock Co.; W. F 
Hudson, Champenois & Co.; WC Miller, The Her- 
man Keck -Mfg. Co.; Walter S. Strauss, Jacob 
Strauss & Sons; L. A. Burt, R. Wallace & Sons 
Mfg. Co. 

Among the traveling men who visited the De- 
troit, Mich., trade about Feb. 1, were- L P 
Cook, S. Sternau & Co.; A. H. Kohn, HenrJ 
I-roehhch & Co.; Mr. Wolff, Eisler & Laubheim - 
W. C. Barry I^rter, Eleox & Co.; Joseph s! 
Frank, Sussfeld, Lorsch & Co.; H. Freund, Henry 
Freund & Bro.; C. A. Hustrom, Wilcox & Evert- 
sen; Charles H. Anderson, Allsopp Bros - Harry 
Osborne, The R. Wallace & Sons Mfg. Co - W H 
Bryant, T. G. Hawkes & Co.; W. H. Race The 
Meriden Silver Plate Co. and the Eureka Silver 
Co.; Willard H. Wheeler, Hayden W. Wheeler & 
Co.; M. Klipper, Hipp. Didisheim & Bro - L E 
Smith, M. B. Bryant & Co.; J. W. McClannin 
The International Silver Co.; W’illiam Baden, The 
Max Nathan Co.; H. I. Hefele, LaPierre Mfg. 
Co.; Charles B. Bartlett, Whiting Mfg. Co.; j! 
M. Morrow, American W'atch Case Co.; G. ’w! 
Bleecker, Martin, Copeland & Co.; M. D. Smith! 
S. B. Champlin Co.; D. Rose, Anthony Eisler & 
Co.; Carl M. Fishel, Fishel, Nessler & Co.; and 
S. C. Howard, Dominick & Haff. 

Representatives of the jewelry trade calling on 
Syracuse, N. Y., jewelers the past two weeks were: 
E. J. Mills, W. & S. Blackinton; Mr. Remington, 
Carter, Qvarnstrom & Remington; Mr. Smith, 
George J. Smith & Co.; D. N. Jacoby, Providence 
Stock Co.; Max L. Jacoby, Manchester Mfg. Co.; 
Walter S. Noon, W. F. Cory & Bro.; Benjamin m! 
Henschel, Heintz Bros.; G. H. Sluter, Carter, 
Hastings & Howe; Willard H. Wheeler, Hayden 
W. Wheeler & Co.; Mr. Walker, The Pairpoint 



brooch mountings for 

-"-"■■iinlllllilllinllK''- 

Individual 

Portraits 

of the uniform size of 
a silver 25c. piece. 

Quality, \ 4ht. only. 

DAY, CLARK & CO., 

23 Maiden Lane, 

MAKERS OF FINE JEWELRY. 


We will send Price-List and this Illustration to any 
approved Dealer on application. 


47 


February 6, 1901, 


THE JEWELERS’ CIRCULAR-WEEKLY. 


Corporation; H. L. Mfitchell; M. B. Rosenback, 
ior William I. Ro‘;enleld; William E. Smith, 
Standaml Oil Co.; Harry W. Frolichstein, Frolich- 
stein & England; Joseph Rosenberg, Loms Stras- 
burger’s Son & Co.; Frank H. Dana, The H. A. 
Kirby Co.; J. Goldberg; S. Cohn, Oppenheimer 
Bros. & Veith; W. S. Gardner, Bassett Jewelry 
Co • Theodore L. Parker, Martin, Copeland .& Co.; 
Mr.’ Cook, Fontneau & Cook; Henry Gruenthal, 
for J J. Cohn; H. B. Richardson, G. A. Dean 
Co.; Garrett G. Freer, E. A. Bliss Co.; Charles 
T. Dougherty, William L. Sexton & Co.; Charles 
A. Hetzel; W. H. Gregory, Strobell & Crane; 
E. C. McCarter, Wilcox & Wagner and Ziruth & 
Moore; R. T. Supple, William B. Durgin Co; C. 

F Sweasey, William B. Kerr & Co. ; W. FI. 
Bryant, T. G. Hawkes & Co.; S. E. Giffen, Na- 
tional Glass Co.; George B. Potter, Emil Weiss- 
brod & Sons; E. H. Cox, Sussfeld, Lorsch & Co.; 
Frank S. Goff, Bennett & Bradford; J. B. Richard- 
son, Payton & Kelley Co.; L. E. Van Florn, 
Philipp Zellenka & Son. 

.\1. Wormood, of the Illinois Watch Co., Spring- 
field, 111., was in St. Louis, Mo., last week. 

Edwin Beckwith. New York Mutual Optical Co., 
was among the optical trade of Trenton, N. J., 
recently. 

The traveling men of the L. Bauman Jewelry 
Co., St. Louis, Mo., six of them, are now on the 
road with their goods. 

L. Adler & Son., New York, will be represented 
on the road by I. L. Friedman, who will carry a 
line of diamond jewelry and mountings. 

William Andrews, formerly with Enos Richardson 
& Co., New York, lis now traveling for J. J. Cohn, 
New York. He is now visiting the trade in the 
west 

J. Bioren, of Bioren Bros., Newark, N. J., and 
,a representative of the Jennings Bros. Co., Bridge- 
port, Conn., visited the jewelers of Trenton, N. J., 
last week. 

Recent travelers in Omaha, Neb., were: J. A. 
Patterson, Hayden W. Wheeler & Co. ; C. A. Gar- 
lick, Schrader- Wittstein Co.; Fred. Pettee, Water- 
bnry Clock Co. 

Among the eastern representatives in St. Louis, 
Mo., last week were: J. Herzog, L. Kaufman & 
Co., the ring manufacturers of New York; Mr. 
Rockwell, The Poole Silver Co. 

Among the travelers who recently visited San 
Francisco, Cal., were: George Paine, E. I. Frank- 
lin & Co.; Mr. Thornton, Powers & Mayer; G. A. 
Whiting, Whiting & Davis; L. E. Fay, R. F. 
Simmons Co., and Wade Williams, Arnold & 
Steere. 

David L. NesLer, the Chicago representative of 
Nesler & Co., Newark, N. J., started last week 
from the factory with the intention of taking in 
Buffalo, Cleveland, Detroit and other cities en 
route to the metropolis of the west. He is still 
selling hoop earrings. 

The following traveling men interviewed the jew- 
elers of Portland, Ore., the past week: W. E. 
Meadows, Phelps & Adams; Louis W. Bruns, 
Juergens & Andersen Co.; Mr. Goldsmith, Adolph 
Goldsmith & Son; Mr. Weil, Electric City Box 
Co. ; Mr. Hammett, Whiting Mfg. Co. ; and a rep- 
resentative of Frank M. Whiting & Co. 

McRae & Keeler, Attleboro, Mass., have made a 
change in their traveling force. Fred. L. Bellows, 
who has been their representative all over the west 
for several years, has left them to start in a new 
business on his own account, in which all wish 
him success. McRae & Keeler have secured the 
services of Mr. Sandfeldter, of St. Louis, who has 
been their employe there. Mr. Sandfeldter will 
cover the territory between New York and Chicago, 


while the metropolis will continue under the direc- 
tion of William A. Lauder. 

An incident of several days ago which had not 
before seen the light of publication has just found 
its way back to Attleboro. On a train running up 
from Dallas, Tex., to Kansas City, Mo., were four 
.\ttleboro traveling salesmen for jewelry houses. 
A member of the quartette is responsible for the 
story, but asks that the names be not used, as it 
would attract the attention of their rivals to the 
fact that the four had invaded Texas for the first 
time and might lead to fresh competition in their 
new field of activity. They found in the train 
with them a gentleman who proved to be one 
William J. Bryan, of Lincoln, Neb. The five got 
into conversation and Mr. Bryan poked a little 
good natured fun at them, declaring that from now 
on he favored protection for Texas if four such 
bright men meant to spend much of their time 
searching for dollars there. The conversation, 
however, quickly took a political turn and a heated 
and brilliant debate on the subject of the coinage 
came about. Mr. Bryan defended his personal 
views on the coinage very ably, but he had practi- 
cal men to contend with. The climax of the de- 
bate, the rem’ark which silenced the great advocate 
of 16 to 1, was the reply given to one of his state- 
ments by the big portly man, whom the traveling 
men occasionally call affectionately, “Colonel.” 
Said Mr. Bryan, “But gold is always fluctuating, 
as well as silver.” “Mr. Bryan,” was the reply, 
“I must disagree with you. In my business for 20 
years I have bought gold for the manufacture of 
jewelry and I have paid the same price for it per 
pennyweight all that time without deviation. dhe 
man who silenced Bryan with cold facts from the 
jewelry district has become the subject of talk 
wherever jewelry makers or sellers are found con- 
gregated. 


Newark. 

Samuel K. Knott, a manufacturing jew- 
eler, 52 years old, died Jan. 19, at his 
home, 95 Academy St. He had been ill 
for several months. The funeral took 
place Wednesday. 

The Cooperative Mercantile Co. have 
been incorporated in Hew Jersey with a 
capital of $500,000, to deal in jewelry. F. 
C. Hobb, Clifford W. Perkins, K. K. Mc- 
Laren, all of Jersey City, are the incor- 
porators. 

At the last meeting of the Jewelers’ 
Protective Union, Local No. 2, of Newark, 
held at headquarters, 210. Market St., it 
was decided to give a sociable to the mem- 
bers and their friends Friday evening. The 
entire official staff of the International 
Jewelers’ Workers’ Union of America and 
Canada and the officers of the New York 
local were invited. 


L. M. Barnes is about to renovate and 
decorate his store at North Adams, Mass. 

John M. Frear, 71 Court St., Bingham- 
ton, 'N. Y., will move about April 1 to 
the People’s Bank building. Whitney & 
Co. then move into the store vacated by 
Mr. Frear. 


♦ ♦ 

♦ 


Yours For 

I BUCKLES, 


♦ 

♦ 

♦ 

♦ 

♦ 

❖ 


♦ 

♦ 

♦ 

♦ 

♦ 

♦ 

♦ 

♦ 

♦ 

♦ 

♦ 

♦ 

♦ 

♦ 

♦ 


OR FOR 


♦ 

♦ 

♦ 


Barrettes, 

Boa Chains, 
Brooches , 
Hat Pins, 
Purses, 

Fish-Scale 


I Chatelaine Bags, | 


OR 


I Souven ir Spoons. | 


We make everything for the 
jeweler and will fill your or= 
ders promptly. 

Send us your wants. 

A Postal Brings Samples. 


I 


Codding &Heilborn Co. 

NORTH ATTLEBORO, 
MASS. 


Sample Office, 11 Maiden Lane, 

NEW YORK. 



DEITSCH BROS., 

MAKERS OF FINE LEATHER GOODS, 


ALSO 


IVORY, EBONY AND SHELL, 


14 East 17th Street, 


NEW YORK. 


4S 


THE JEWELERS’ CIRCULAR-WEEKLY. 


February 6, 1901. 


Providence. 

Arthur Henius, Providence representa- 
tive for Bruhl Bros., arrived in this city 
last week from a business tour of Europe. 

The monthly meeting of the New Eng- 
land directors of the Jewelers' Association 
and Board of Trade will be held in the 
Wilcox building to-morrow. 

Noah H. Holt. Providence representa- 
tive of the Jewelers’ Association and Board 
of Trade, delivered an interesting address 
on “The Abundant Life,” before the St. 
Thomas Club, at Taunton, Mass., last 
week. 

In the case of Jacot & Son, New York, 
against W. J. Briggs & Co., Pawtucket, 
for $84 on book account, heard in the 
10th District Court, at Pawtucket, last 
week, a decision was entered in favor of 
the plaintiffs. 

Frank H. Gladding, traveling represent- 
ative of Clark & Coombs, has the sympa- 
thy of his associates in the loss of his wife, 
who died last week. Mrs. Cladding's fa- 
ther, the late J. D. Benton, was a well 
known jeweler in this city. 

Among the jewelry buyers in the city 
the past week were: S. Goldstein, Market 
St. Novelty House, Philadelphia; Mr. 
Hilleson, of Hilleson Bros., Toledo. O.; 
Bennett Siegel, Des Moines, la.; A. Gold- 
man, of Goldman & Collins, Pittsburgh. 

Another evidence of the desire which 
President Holbrook, of the Gorham Mfg. 
Co., has for the betterment of the condi- 
tion of the employes at the works, is to 
be found in the recent gift by Mr. Hol- 


brook of a library of some 800 volumes, 
covering a wide range of subjects, to be 
placed in the Casino for the use of the 
employes. 

Among the incorporated companies 
chartered in Rhode Island who have filed 
their annual statements with the City 
Clerk are the Daggett Jewelrj- Co., At- 
tleboro, and the Cornell-Andrews Smelt- 
ing Co., of this city. The certificate of the 
Daggett Jewelry Co. sets forth that the 
capital is $15,000, all paid in; that they 
have no real estate; that the value of their 
personal assets Dec. 31, 1900, was $24,- 
188.52, and that the liabilities on that date 
were $8,680. The certificate of the Con- 
nell-Andrews Smelting Co. states that the 
capital, which was limited to $15,000, has 
been increased by the amount of $15,000, 
and that the whole amount was paid in on 
Jan. 5. 1901. 

The Gorham Silversmiths’ Mutual Aid 
Society held their 36th annual meeting at 
the Gorham Casino, Thursday evening 
last. The reports submitted showed the 
organization to be in a prosperous condi- 
tion. Disbursements during the past 19 
years have amounted to $46,797.82. The 
present membership is 540 and 82 appli- 
cations for membership are pending. The 
amount of receipts for the past year was 
$5,544.62 and the amount of disbursements 
during the same period was $5,086.03. The 
following officers were elected: President, 
Arnold C. Brown; vice-president, Louis 
P. Rittman; treasurer, W. A. Clissold; 
secretary, Fred A. Burt; auditors, George 


II. Rhodes and Robert H. Anderson; 
physician, W. L. Harris, M.D. 

The annual reunion of the heads of de- 
partments of the Gorham Mfg. Co. works, 
in this city, was held Wednesday evening, 
at the Gorham Casino. About 60 persons 
sat down to the excellent banquet that 
had been provided. Superintendent Fred 
Lawton presided, and the informal post- 
prandial exercises included remarks by 
John F. P. Lawton, secretary of company, 
who talked interestingly on the remarka- 
ble growth of the works during the 40 
odd years he had been connected with the 
institution, and by Mr. Codnian, the chief 
designer, who gave a brief account of his 
experiences at the Paris Exposition. Re- 
marks were also made by ^Ir. Aldrich, of 
the office department, and Mr. Vogle. 


Baltimore. 

John N. H. Menger has sold his busi- 
ness to Jerome W. Schirm. Mr. Schirm 
was for many years with J. Stuart Mac- 
Donald. 

Charles C. Stieff, manager of the Balti- 
more Sterling Silver Co., was elected sec- 
retary of the regular Democratic Associa- 
tion of the Second Ward, Jan. 29. 

William H. Hennegen, of the Hennegen, 
Bates Co., was a member of the hospitality 
committee to whom the success of the 
Merchants’ and Manufacturers’ Associa- 
tion banquet, held Jan. 31, was due. J. 
Smith Hopkins was a subscriber to the 
banquet. 

The magnificent silver punch bowl, de- 
si.gned and made by Jacobi & Jenkins, 
which is a testimonial to S. Davies War- 
field, chairman of the e.xecutive commit- 
tee of the Honest iMoney Democratic 
League, was presented to iMr. Warfield, 
Jan. 31. The bowl has already been de- 
scribed in these columns. 

Henry Maas, one of the men charged 
with assaulting and robbing Alexander J. 
Hubbard, last November, was removed Jan. 
30 from the Towson jail to the Baltimore 
City jail. It was thought that an attempt 
might be made to get him out or that he 
might escape, so it was deemed advisable 
to remove him to the city until the date of 
his trial. 

John Smith, alias Edward Whalen, alias 
Eddie Ward, alias “Boston Frank,” etc., 
who is in jail awaiting trial on a charge of 
stealing a diamond pin from J. Stuart Mac- 
Donald, is believed to have had a hand in 
the robbery of the jewelry store of J. V. Al- 
friend & Co., Norfolk. Va., last December, 
when about $4,000 worth of jewelry was 
stolen. James P. Banner, a representative 
of Alfriend & Co., came to Baltimore Jan. 
31, and upon seeing Smith in jail he iden- 
tified him as the man seen in Norfolk about 
the time of the robbery. 


The line of diamond jewelry made by 
Gattle, Ettinger & Hammel, 68 Nassau 
St., New York, is appropriately designated 
by them “masterpieces of the jewelers’ 
art.” Pendants, tiaras, hair ornaments, 
pearl necklaces, collarettes and rings of 
unique and highly artistic design, set with 
perfect gems in attractive combinations, 
comprise a line which jewelers in search 
of pieces with which to appeal to the cul- 
tivated taste cannot afford to overlook. 


4 

.! An Event in Cut Glassware 

i 

We are fast pushing into prominence an 
entirely ne'w line of Novelties, ■which we 
consider the best ever made in . . . 

...Cut Glassware... 

If you order one of our 

$25 Assortments, 

Consisting of 9 v/ell-selected pieces, each 
different, you will understand the heading 
of this advertisement. 

^ Remember that this Assortment will be our only salesman. 

I WICKE & CO., 32 Park Place, New York. 


February 6, 1901. 


THE JEWELERS’ CIRCULAR-WEEKLY. 


49 


Attleboro. 


R. M. Derick and George W. Enbom, 
who have been in business some time as 

R. M. Derick & Co., dissolved partner- 
ship this week. They plan to resume busi- 
ness as individuals. 

The Charles S. Bush Co., dealers in 
jewelers’ supplies, are building an Attle- 
boro headquarters on Railroad Ave. They 
have placed in charge Sanford A. Hamil- 
ton, late of the Hamilton Co., jobbers. 

R. Curtis Read, .New York representa- 
tive for J. C. Cummings & Co., was called 
home by telegraph last week owing to the 
death of his father, Henry C. Read. The 
young jeweler has the sympathy of scores 
of friends. 

The Attleboro Y. M. C. A. has arranged 
to give a course of four free lectures, illus- 
trated, on design, by a member of the fac- 
ulty of the Rhode Island School of De- 
sign for the young men employed in the 
Attleboro jewelry factories. 

P. John Cummings, of P. J. Cummings 
& Co., left last week for St. Augustin', 
Fla., for his health. Frank Barton, trav- 
eling man for the house, accompanied him 
to Washington, leaving him there to start 
for his western circuit. 

The Attleboro school board annual re- 
port contains a recommendation that the 
town introduce manual training into the 
schools in 1901, the course being designed 
to train up engravers, designers and other 
craftsmen for the jewelry business. 

Charles H. Makepeace and John E. 
Sherman, who have been doing business 
under the name of the Attleboro Chain 
Co., dissolved partnership last week. Fred 

S. Cobb, for several years with G. H. 
Herrick & Co., purchased the interest of 
Mr. Makepeace. 

Norton, bordering Attleboro on the 
south, finds that its jewelry factory village, 
styled Chartley, is growing rapidly. It has 
appealed to the State Legislature for per- 
mission to issue bonds to install a suitable 
town water supply, principally owing to the 
increase in tenements there. 

Leslie Fisher, one of the expert engrav- 
ers of Bates & Bacon, who could not fol- 
low the plant into the employ of the Phil- 
adelphia Watch Case Co., because of being 
a member of the American Federation of 
Labor, left last week for Canton, O., to 
enter on a position with the Dueber Watch 
.Case Mfg. Co. 

Clarence L. Watson, of the Watson & 
Newell Co., appears as one of the peti- 
tioners in the movement of the big and 
wealthy Interstate Consolidated Electric 
Street Railway Co., which covers the 
jewelry territory, to transfer its incorpo- 
ration from Rhode Island to Massachu- 
setts, the matter being before the House 
now. 

The bill for the raising of the compul- 
sory education age limit in Massachusetts 
from 14 to 10 years was killed in com- 
mittee last week. The treatment of this 
bill in the editorial columns of this paper 
when it was introduced received flattering 
comment in the local press and among 
readers in the Attleboro Republican Club 
rooms. 

A large sum of money was raised 
by capitalists’ subscriptions in 1893, 
during the depression in the jewelry 


business, to aid the destitute employes of 
the local factories. It was later ai’.gmented 
by similar subscriptions to aid the fami- 
lies of Attleboro jewelry operatives who 
went into the Spanish war. J. L. Sweet, 
of the R. F. Simmo.ns Co., was at the 
head of the organization empowered to 
expend the money. As it has lain idle for 
some years it was Saturday turned over 
to the King’s Daughters. 

In the statistics of Attleboro jewelry 
factories in the last issue of The Circu- 
lar-Weekly, there was a palpable mis- 
statement regarding the number of em- 
ployes in the factory of S. O. Bigney & 
Co. In this factory there are now em- 
ployed over 100 females, the entire num- 
ber of male and female employes exceeding 
200. This large force have been kept busy 
largely during the entire year, and have 
been working evenings during the past 
month. The S. O. Bigney & Co. factory 
is one of the truly busy spots in the town. 

There was lively bidding Saturday last 
for pews at the Second Congregational 
Church. Charles A. Marsh, of C. A. 
Marsh & Co., and Raymond M. Horton, 
of the old firm of Walch & Horton, paid 
the highest premiums, each going $135 
over the set price for a pew out of oenti- 
ment and because of the immense demand. 
At the election of officers of the church 
last week the following received notice: 
Charles E. Bliss, of Bliss Bros.; Albert 
A. Bushee, of A. Bushee & Co.; Harry P. 
Kent, of F. W. Weaver & Co,; Sidney O. 
Bigney, of S. O. Bigney & Co., and Her- 
man T. Regnell, of Regnell, Bigney & Co. 


David Simmons, jeweler, 543 W. Market 
St., Louisville, Ky., Thursday, found a 
purse with $400 in bills and a check for 
$150. In it was the name of the owner, to 
whom Mr. Simmons returned it. 


Horace Finberg, a Polish watchmaker, 
of Mt. Carmel, Pa., fasted 24 hours, stand- 
ing in one position, last week, in order to 
win a wager of $10. 


North Attleboro. 

George K. Webster, accompanied by his 
traveler, Nathan F. Swift, left Friday last 
for a week’s fishing through the ice on 
Lake Winnepesaukee, N. H, Mr, Swift 
owns a little cottage there. 

G. Herbert French, of Riley, French & 
Heffron, made a large purchase of real 
estate from Francis G. Pate, of F. G. 
Pate & Co., last week. Mr. French has 
gone to Florida for a short pleasure trip. 

Rev. Fr. Charles J. Burns, the loved 
rector of St. Mary’s Catholic Church, in 
North Attleboro, died last week. At the 
hour of his funeral on Saturday several 
local jewelry factories suspended opera- 
tions. 

John H. Peckham, of the recently dis- 
solved firm of Palmer & Peckham, re- 
signed last Wednesday his place on the 
Board of North Attleboro Selectmen. He 
left before the end of the week for Chica- 
go, where he proposes to enter the jew- 
elry business. 

A veteran jewelry manufacturer and re- 
spected citizen, Abiel Codding, celebrated 
with modest ceremony last week the 84th 
anniversary of his birth. Mr. Codding is 
a native of this section, born in Rehoboth, 
the son of Abiel and Chloe Daggett Cod- 
ding. From a Revolutionary hero, James 
A. Codding, of Taunton, his grandfather, 
he inherited a sturdy manhood which 
would have marked the family for success 
in any line of activity. In 1839 he went to 
Philadelphia and engaged in the jewelry 
business there for two years, returning to 
the Attleboros in 1841. On his return he 
entered the firm of Ira Richards & Co., 
and after Mr. Richards’s death he re- 
mained for 30 years the active head of 
E. Ira Richards & Co. He has been 
active in other enterprises, being for years 
president of the Attleboro Savings bank 
and director of the local National bank. 
He is president of the North Attleboro 
gaslight corporation, and the oldest Mason 
in the Attleboros. Two sons, James A. 
and Edwin A., are prominent in local busi- 
ness circles. 



HALL CLOCKS 

GOLDEN OAK, FLEMISH 

AND MAHOGANY. 


20 Good Selling Patterns 

FROM 

$67.00, less 57o, upward. 


STOCK READY FOR DELIVERY. 


SEND FOR CATALOGUE AND PRICE-LIST. 


FRANK HERSCHEDE, 

Manufacturer, 

24 East Fourth Street, CINCINNATI, O. 



50 


THE JEWELERS’ CIRCULAR-WEEKLY. February 6, 1901. 


Tull Revival of the earring. 

S INCE Cleopatra’s time and her mag- 
nificent pearl earring, which played 
such a prominent part in her life or, rather, 
death, this particular piece of feminine 
jewelry has come in and gone out regularly 
with the tide of popularity. Just now ear- 
rings are considered quite the correct 
thing, though for 10 or 15 years they have 
scarcelj' been worn at all. The “grown- 


and undergo inspection. If they would be 
converted into strictly modern ones they 
must paj" a visit to the jeweler and be re- 
set. Two settings are permissible — the 
screw and the .French, this latter a com- 
bination of the screw and the old fashioned 
“drop,” but without the swing. Pearls and 
turquoises, alone or set round with dia- 
monds, are all you have to select from if 
you confine yourself to the earrings of 
fashion. Of course, pearls, lustrous and of 


portant to avoid. 

Just now collarettes seem to be more 
popular than ever. In design and com- 
bination of stones they are certainly ex- 
quisite. offering a rare chance for display 
of individual taste. One of all diamonds 
is not considered as elegant as one com- 
bining stones of color. It is the connois- 
seur, though, who really prefers a design 
worked out in rich colorings. This taste 
for gems of color is like that for pomelloes. 


[GROUPED AND ENGRAVED FOR “THE JEWELERS’ CIRCULAR-WEEKLY’’ FROM PHOTOGRAPHS BY ROSE & SANDS, 244 
FIFTH AVE., NEW YORK.— LOANED TO THIS JOURNAL BY THE SUNDAY EDITION OF THE NEW YORK “HERALD.’’] 



ups” of that period are probably prepared 
to welcome them as old friends. To the 
others it will be a new experience, and 
means having the ears pierced. Jewelers 
have been predicting for the last two years 
the revival of this fashion, and there haj 
been a marked tendency in its direction, 
and now it is generally admitted that ear- 
rings are positively to be worn. 

Old earrings may be brought forth from 
their velvet resting places of many years 


fairly good size, are favorites. These are 
rare and expensive enough to be much de- 
sired by smart women. The French set- 
ting admits of a little variety. A small 
diamond forms the head of the screw, and 
depending from this is a large pearl, held 
perfectly firm by a fine wire loop which 
passes under the lobe of the ear and fastens 
at the back on the point of the screw. The 
effect is that of the drop, yet there is no 
swinging, the one thing that is most im- 


an acquired one; it grows with amazing 
rapidity, and its gratification is deter- 
mined only by one’s income. 

Where pearls are the stones for collar- 
ettes, diamond bars are generally used, and 
these may be quite plain or of fancy de- 
sign. Matching the pearls when several 
hundred are needed ia by no means an easy 
thing. In size, shape and luster they must 
he exactly alike, and these three qualities 
fix their price. — New York Herald. 


Fe'bruary 6, 1901. 


THE JEWELERS’ CIRCULAR-WEEKLY. 


51 



STERLING 


GO'RHAM 

costs oo more than inferior wares without a. reputa- 
tion. The trade mark it bears is a recognized symbol 
of standard value the world over. 

GO'RHAM ^IL\/EP^ 

received the Grand Prix the Paris Exposition. 

Gorham Mfg. Co. 

Broadway and Nineteenth St., N. Y. 


NEW YORK 
21-23 Maiden Lane 


'B'RAJSfCHES 

CHICAGO 

131-137 Wabash Avenue 


SAN FRANCISCO 
118-120 Sutter Street 


i 


G GO'RHAM 

is sold to the legitimate jewelry trade only. No fear 
of competition with Department Stores. They can’t 
buy it. 

O GO'RHAM ^ILl/EB^ 

is made to meet aJl demands of the trade, from the 
smallest inexpensive objects to the finest examples of 
hand-wrought ware. 

GO'RHAM ^IL\/EP^ 

R is known everywhere to represent the most a^pproved 

atnd fashionable designs sls well a^s unequalled 
workmanship. 

H 

A 

M 

SILVER 


THE JEWELERS’ CIRCULAR-WEEKLY. 


February G, 1901. 




Philadelphia. 

William Atherholt. of L. C. Reisner & 
Co., is canvassing the Schuylkill \’allcy. 

F. M. Rodgers, watchmaker for C. R. 
Smith & Son. has resigned his position. 

Charles Beerhalter has redcned his p c ce 
as clockmaker at the Bailee. Banks & Bid- 
dle Co. 

Thomas Haddocks, of Simons, Bro. & 
Co., left Saturday on his 33d annual tour 
through the south, accompanied by his 
wife. 

Nellie Haines, daughter of William 
Haines, retail jeweler, 1224 Columbia Ave., 
was married last week to Charles South- 
well. 

The Quaker City Cut Glass Co., who 


America’s Leading Art and 
Jewelry Auctioneer, 

Dan I. Murray. 

Twenty years’ experi- 
ence in the Wholesale, 
Retail, Manufacturing 
and Importing Jewelry 
Business. 

I have never failed to move a stock. I 
work on commission. My methods are new 
and original. 

WRITE ME EOR TERMS, Etc. 

126 State St., Room 602, Chicago, III. 
No. 3 Maiden Lane, Room 61, New Yo k. 

AT PRESENT SELLING FOR E. L. CllENDET, 21 
JOHN ST., NEW YORK, large importer of Musical 
Boxes and French Bric-a-Brac. 


have their factory at 1819 N. 5th St., were 
I chartered at Dover, Del., Friday, with a 
capital stock of $250,000. 
j W’illiam F. IMichael, for six years gen- 
eral manager of the establishment of Da- 
vis & Galt, silver.smiths, has resigned his 
position with that house. 

Edward B. Chase, of J. E. Caldwell & 
Co., intends to build a handsome new res- 
idence near the Rose Tree Hunt Club 
House, Delaware county. 

J. H. Shaw, a badge and medal maker 
on Arch St. near Broad St., intends to 
bring suit in the Dauphin county courts 
to recover for badges furnished the mem- 
bers of the Legislature at the time of the 
unveiling of the Washington monument. 

A bill aimed at Philadelphia’s big de- 
partment stores was introduced in the Del- 
aware Legislature, Eriday. It provides 
that every order and delivery wagon shall 
be licensed. The big local stores deliver 
goods in Wilmington and elsewhere in 
that State. 

Joseph K. Davison, manufacturing jew- 
eler, 718 Sansom St., received the contract 
last week for 5,000 medals to commemo- 
rate the inauguration of McKinley and 
Roosevelt at Washington next month. 
The contract was secured direct from the 
Inauguration Committee. 

The Peter L. Krider Co. have opened 
an office and salesroom in the Real Estate 
Trust building, southeast corner of Chest- 
nut and Broad Sts. Mr. Newhall has on 
exhibition some beautiful specimens of 
sterling ware art in centerpieces, loving 
cups and pitchers. The factory, under the 
management of Mr. Wood, is still in the 
old cpiarters on Chestnut St. 

Letters of administration were granted 


Thursday to IMrs. M. B. Allebach, on the 
estate of her husband, Mahlon B. Alle- 
I bach, formerly a retail jeweler at 1328 
Walnut St. The estate is conservatively 
valued at $13,500, but is believed to be 
worth more. It is the intention of Mrs. 
Allebach to .=ell the stock, fixtures and 
good will of the Walnut St. store at 
private sale. 

The shuffle board team, representing the 
Philadelphia Jewelers’ Club in their tour- 
nament with the Harold Club, has so far 
scored decisive victories, and will, in all 
likelihood, triumph in the end. The team 
comprises J. Warner Hutchins, L. P. 
White, A. G. Lee, William F. Parry, Wil- 
liam H. Long, Joe Cadwalader, Zophia 
Laird, A. J. Le Jambre, William Quinn 
and Fred Block. 

Simon Pfaelzer, a member of Pfaelzer 
Bros. & Co., jobbing and retail jewelers, 
932 Market St., has retired from business, 
after having been connected with the trade 
in this city 34 years. Ite will sail in a 
few days for Europe for a pleasure trip. 
His retirement took effect Feb. 1. The 
business will be carried on hereafter by 
Morris and Frank Pfaelzer, at the old 
stand, under the name of Pfaelzer & Son. 
Frank Pfaelzer has been taken into part- 
nership to succeed his uncle. Simon Pfael- 
zer, who, during 34 years as a jobbing 
jeweler, formed a wide circle of acquain- 
tances in the trade in this country and 
abroad, was born 54 years ago in Hems- 
bach, Baden, Germany. He came to this 
country when 19 years old and immediate- 
ly entered the jewelry store of his brother, 
Morris Pfaelzer, at 201 Market St. At 
the end of a year he was taken into part- 
nership and the two moved to 243 Market 
St., where they opened a store. They en- 
tered the jobbing field at this time and 
built up a lucrative trade. After occupy- 
ing various sites they moved, three years 
ago, to 932 Market St. Simon Pfaelzer is 
believed to have amassed a fortune. His 
retirement from business will be regretted. 


Lancaster, Pa. 

J. M. Jenks, of J. M. Jenks & Co., has 
left on a four months’ western trip in the 
interests of his house. 

William H. Herr, jeweler, Columbia, 
this county, has made an assignment to 
R. Morgan Root, of Pottstown, Pa., for 
the benefit of his creditors. 

Joseph Hahn, foreman of the supply de- 
partment at L. C. Reisner & Co.’s estab- 
lishment. who was seriously ill for several 
weeks, has resumed his duties. 


L. W. NimSCHKE, 

DIE SINKING, DESIGNING, 

Stamping for the Trade, 

203 Centre Street, 

Entrance corner Howard St., NEW YORK 

AMERICAN PEARLS 

and baroques bought for cash or sold on 
commission. Correspondence solicited. 
;Establlshed i88o. 

We also make a nice line of baroque pearl 
jewelry for the trade. 

CHAS. S. CROSSMAN & CO., 

3 Maiden I.ane, New Tork. 


For the next two weeks, address my New York office. 


1837. 

Geo. O. Street. 

1842 . 

Geo. O. Street & Co. 

1863. 

Geo. O. Street & Son. 
1880. 

Geo. O. Street & Sons. 

FINE GOODS ONLY. 


GEO. O. STREET & SONS, 

Manufacturing Je’welers, 


S)- 


CHICAGO OFFICE, 

103 State Street. 


24 JOHN STREET, 

NE’W^ YORK. 


I^oward Stcrlind Co., 

SILVERSMITHS, 



TRADE MARK. 


PROVIDE.NCE. AND NE.W YORK. 

112 KEARNY ST., SAN FRANCISCO, CAL. 


Sample Lines at all commercial centres at regular intervals. 



February 6, l&Ol. 


THE JEWELERS’ CIRCULAR-WEEKLY. 


53 



Our new Productions 


FOR THE SPRING SEASON INCLUDE MANY NEW SHAPES AND 
DESIGNS, AT PRICES WHICH WILL MAKE 
THEM LEADERS. 


Jewelers who have experienced an increasing demand for the highest grade High 
Art Silverware are advised to examine our lines. 

iPr/ces on appiication, 

Cbc mauser mffl. €o., 

“ 2£/aicA Our ^c/s. ” ...SILVERSMITHS... 

1 5th Street, between Broadway and Fifth Avenue, NEW YORK. 

RPANrHPt;- i CHICAGO, 126 State Street; Jack Stanley, Representative. 

■ ‘ NEW YORK, Gill Bldg.; Louis B. Cummings, Representative. 







THE JEWELERS’ CIRCULAR-WEEKLY. 


A.&B. 

HEADQUARTERS 

FOR 

Waltham Watches 

EVERY GRADE. 

One of our 

SPECIALTIES 

is a 

Waltham 0 size 
movement, nickel, 
1 1 jewels in set= 
tings, Breguethair 
spring; made in 
Hunting, Open 
Faceand Skylight. 
Sample sent for in= 
spection if desired. 

Solid Gold, Qold= 
Filled and Silver 
Cases, embracing 
all sizes, and in 
complete variety 
of designs. 



February 6, 1901. 


Canada Notes. 

H. Sheppard has opened a jewelry store 
at Grand View, Man. 

R. J. Vincent has purchased the jewelry 
business of P. A. Crews, Mount Forest 
Ont. 

Winnipeg, Man., may soon have a city 
clock with four faces for the City Hall 
tower. 

The Hemming Mfg. Co., Toronto, have 
placed on the market a line of memorial 
badges for Queen Victoria, which are be- 
ing extensively worn. 

The jewelry store of A. Martin, St. 
Vincent and Notre Dame Sts., Montreal, 
was broken into Jan. 25 and some valuable 
articles were stolen. Mr. Martin reported 
the aflfair to the police. 

George E. Cooper, well known to the 
trade as an expert engraver on his own ac- 
count, died on Jan. 24 in the General Hos- 
pital, Toronto, aged 55 years. He had a 
large number of friends in sporting and 
military circles. 

W. F. Carrier, formerly in the wholesale 
jewelry trade in Toronto, but of late years 
the business representative of the Mon- 
treal Star, in Toronto, died on the 26th 
inst. at Grace Hospital, where he had gone 
to have an operation performed. 

Aaron Levy, who has represented Levy 
Bros. Co., Hamilton, on the road for the 
last 10 years, has gone to Chicago. His 
place has been taken by J. Bowen, formerly 
traveling representative of J. Eastwood, 
New Glasgow, N. S. C. S. McLeod, jew- 
eler, Amherst, N. S., will also travel for 
Levy Bros. Co. in the Maritime Provinces. 

Miss Amelia Knight, employed as a 
saleswoman in T. N. Rickard’s jewelry 
store, Bowmanville, Ont., met with a ter- 
rible death on Feb. 27. Driving in a car- 
riage near Bowmanville in company with 
her sister, iMiss Helen Knight, and Her- 
bert J. Hallett, of Whitby, the carriage 
was run into at the Grand Trunk Railway 
crossing and all three instantly killed. It is 
not known exactly how the accident oc- 
curred. The whistle of the locomotive was 
blown as usual, but the train was almost 
upon the carriage before the engineer 
noticed it. 

Detective Cuddy, while standing in 
Ward’s pawn shop, Toronto, saw a man 
named Joseph McCready enter. His evi- 
dent embarrassment on seeing the officer 
aroused the suspicion of the latter, who 
at once arrested McCready and found a 
new watch in his possession. He traced 
the watch to Mrs. Gowland’s retail jewelry 
store. King St. E. The property had not 
been missed, but investigation showed the 
loss. McCready was brought before the 
police magistrate on Jan. 29 charged with 
the theft, and was identified as having 
spent some time at the store on pretence 
of wishing to make a purchase. He was 
convicted and sentenced to six months’ im- 


prisonment. He is also wanted in Tren- 
ton, Ont., but on a charge of theft. 

William G. Lewars, of the Bon Ton 
Novelty Co., was arraigned at the Police 
Court, in Toronto, on the 1st inst., 
charged with making a fraudulent use 
of the mails by advertising to send 
tea sets, jewelry, etc., free to any- 
one selling '25 pins at 10 cents each. 
A. R. Farrance, an expert jeweler, swore 
that a stone described as a “glorious South 
.A.frican gem’’ of marvelous brilliancy was 
really worth about 40 cents. Lewars’s cash 
book showed that the “handsome ladies’ 
and gents’ chains’’ advertised cost him 50 
cents per half dozen, and a watch described 
as of “beautiful and delicate workmanship’’ 
was pronounced by the expert “the worst 
excuse for a watch he had ever seen.” The 
advertisement regarding a 56-piece tea set 
was so carefully worded as to leave it in 
doubt whether the correspondent was en- 
titled to receive the entire set or only a 
single piece of it. The case was enlarged 
until Tuesday, the 5th inst. 


Hearing on the Petition of the New Eng- 
land Optical Institute. 

Boston, Mass., Feb. 4.— On Feb. 11 a 
hearing will be given by the Legislative 
Committee on the petition of the New 
England Optical Institute. The petition, as 
outlined in a previous issue of this paper, is 
for the right to grant the degrees of “Doc- 
tor of Physiological Optics” (D.P.O.), and 
“Bachelor of Optics” (B.O.). 

It was learned to-day that there is likely 
to be some opposition to the passage of this 
bill, it being said that the State Board of 
Health opposes it on the ground that no 
such degree as contemplated should be 
given to anyone not a physician. On the 
other hand, the men who are working for 
the bill say that a physician’s knowledge is 
not necessary. It is very likely that the 
hearing will result in some very lively argu- 
ments. The New England Optical Insti- 
tute has engaged legal talent to look after 
its interests and the result will be awaited 
with great interest by all branches of tlm 
trade. 


Bankruptcy Proceedings Against Mich- 
ael Schuster. 

Washington, D. C., Jan, 30. — Proceed- 
ings in involuntary bankruptcy were to-day 
instituted in the Supreme Court of the Dis- 
trict of Columbia, by Adolph Rosenthal, 
I. W. Friedman and Eliassof Bros. & Co., 
wholesale jewelers of New York, asking 
the Court to declare Michael Schuster, a 
jeweler of this city, bankrupt. The credi- 
tors ask that a receiver be appointed to 
take charge of all the goods, effects and 
properties of Schuster. 

Justice Hagner issued a rule requiring 
Schuster to show cause why he should not 
be declared a bankrupt and why a receiver 
should not be appointed, as requested. 


Avery & Brovi^n, 

68 Nassau St., New York. 



THE WASHBURN { THE WASHBURN 

MAGIC N U T, 1 

PERFECTED, \ 

For Ear Studs, Scarf Pins, Studs, *c. < 

HOI.D3 SECURELY ON SMOOTH WIRE. > opm. a£o«D. 

Made in 18k., Ilk., lik. Plate, Silrer and Alnminum. S FOR BROOCHES. 
OBscRiPTivKcmcDLaBosapPLicaTioa < Can be applied tc 

QEO. W. WASHBURN, Sole Manufacturer, \ any irork where Pin 
12-16 John Street, New York. / Ton/rnes are need. 


February 6, 1901. 


THE JEWELERS’ CIRCULAR-WEEKLY. 


55 



THE "DUKE OF YORK. 


iSTTlEIKILaFfdS 


Whiting M’fg Co. 

Silversmiths, 
Broadway & i8th St., 

NEW YORK. 


t ’ We take 

\j I TLEASURE IN 

y V V VsHO VYING HERE- 
WITH OUR LATEST PAT- 
TERN (design patented) 
OF FORKS AND SPOONS. 

All our lines for the Spring 

SEASON HAVE BEEN GREATLY EN- 
RICHED, THEREBY ENABLING US TO PRE- 
SENT ALTOGETHER THE FINEST STOCK OF 
DESIRABLE GOODS EVER OFFERED. 


56 


THE JEWELERS’ CIRCULAR-WEEKLY. 


February 6, 1901. 


WALTHAM WATCHES. 

16 Size, S. W., '99 Model, Pendant Setting. 

HUNTING OR OPEN FACE. 


RIVERSIDE MAXIMUS, Nickel; 

21 Diamond and Ruby Jewels; Two Pairs Diamond Caps; Both Balance Pivots running on 
Diamonds; Raised Gold Settings ; Jewel Pin Set without Shellac; Double Roller Escapement; 
Steel Escape Wheel; Exposed Pallets; Compensating Balance, Accurately Adjusted to Tempera- 
ture, Isochronism and Five Positions, and Carefully Timed ; Patent Breguet Hairspring, Hardened 
and Tempered in Form; Patent Micrometric Regulator ; Tempered Steel Safety Barrel; Exposed 
Winding Wheels; Gold Train; Fine Glass Hand-Painted Dial of Most Modern and Artistic Design. 
The superior construction of this movement adapts it to the most exacting service. 

RIVERSIDE, Nickel; 

17 Fine Ruby Jewels; Raised Gold Settings; Double Roller Escapement; Steel Escape Wheel ; 
Exposed Pallets; Compeasating Balance, Adjusted to Temperature and Three Positions; Patent 
Breguet Hairspring, Hardened and Tempered in Form; Patent Micrometric Regulator; Tempered 
Steel Safety Barrel; Exposed Winding Wheels; Red Gold Centre Wheel. 

ROYAL, Nickel; 

17 Jewels; Red Gold Settings; Exposed Pallets ; Compensating Balance, Adjusted to Temperature ; 
Patent Breguet Hairspring, Hardened and Tempered in Form; Patent Micrometric Regulator; 
Tempered Steel Safety Barrel; Exposed Winding Wheels; Red Gold Centre Wheel. 

No. 630, Nickel; 

17 Jewels; Red Gilded Settings; Exposed Pallets; Compensating Balance, Adjusted to Tempera- 
ture ; Patent Breguet Hairspring, Hardened and Tempered in Form; Patent Micrometric Regu- 
lator; Tempered Steel Safety Barrel; Exposed Winding Wheels; Red Gilded Centre Wheel. 

No. 620, Nickel; 

15 Jewels; Settings; Exposed Pallets; Cut Expansion Balance; Patent Breguet Hairspring, 
Hardened and Tempered in Form; Patent Micrometric Regulator; Tempered Steel Safety Barrel; 
Exposed Winding Wheels; Polished and Red Gilded Centre Wheel and Jewel Settings. 

No. 610, Nickel; 

7 Jewels; Exposed Pallets; Cut Expansion Balance; Patent Breguet Hairspring, Hardened and 
Tempered in Form; Tempered Steel Safety Barrel; Exposed Winding Wheels. 


Manufactured and Warranted by 

AMERICAN WALTHAM WATCH CO., 

WALTHAM, MASS. 

a 


-H4 


February 6, 1901. 


THE JEWELERS’ CIRCULAR-WEEKLY. 


57 


t«4JEWELERS* 

CIRCULAR 



PUBLISHED EVERY WEDNESDAY BY 

THE JEWELERS’ CIRCULAR PUB’G CO., 

CORBIN Building, 11 John St.. Cor. Broadway 
New York. 

telephone: cable address: 

114S CORTLANDT. JEWLAR, NEW YORK 


Vol. XLII. Feb. 6, 1901. 


No. 1. 


A JOUKNAL DEVOTED TO THE INTERESTS OF JEW 
ELERS, WATCHMAKERS, SILVERSMITHS, ELECTRO- 
PLATE MANUFACTURERS, AND ALL ENGAGED IN 
KINDRED BRANCHES OF INDUSTRY. 


Member of the American Trade Press Association, 


Our editorial columns will contain our own 
opinions only, and we will present in other col- 
umns only what we consider of interest or value 
to our readers. Advertising matter will not be 
printed as news. 

Advertising rates in The Jewelers’ Circular- 
Weekly are lower, considering the number of 
tradesmen reached by its large circulation, than 
in any other jewelry journal. 

Notices of changes in standing advertisements 
must be received one week in advance; new mat- 
ter can be received up to Monday. 


INFORMATION FOR SUBSCRIBERS. 


Terms of Subscription, Postage Prepaid. 

PER ANNUM. 


United States and Canada, . - - $2.0G 

Foreign Countries in Postal Union, • 4.00 

England and Colonies, ... 16s. 

France and Switzerland, ... 20 fr. 

Germany, 16 marks 

Single Copies, ..... .10 


New Subscribers can commence at any time. 

Payments for The Jewelers’ Circular-Weekly, 
when sent by mail, should be made in a Post-Offic ; 
Money Order, Bank Check or Draft, or an Ex^ 
press Money Order or Registered Letter. All post- 
masters are required to register letters whenever 
requested to do so. 

Pay money only to authorized collectors having 
proper credentials. 

Returning Copies. Returning your paper will not 
enable us to discontinue it, as we cannot find your 
name on our books unless your address is given. 

Changing Address. In changing address always 
give the old as well as the new one. Your name 
cannot be found on our books unless this is done. 

Discontinuances. We will continue to send 
papers until there is a specific order to stop, in 
connection with which all arrearages must be paid; 
but such an order can be given at any time, to 
take effect at or after the expiration of the sub- 
scription. All such orders will be promptly ac- 
knowledged by mail. 

Liability. The courts have decided that all sub- 
scribers to journals are responsible until arrear- 
ages are paid in full and an order to discontinue 
has been received by the publisher. 


The JEWELERS’ CIRCULAR-WEEKLY 
IN EUROPE. 

Among the places in Europe where It is on file are the 
following : 

LONDON — First Ave. Hotel, Holborn, E. C. ; Hol- 
born Viaduct Hotel, Royal Hotel. 

PARIS — Hotel de L’Athene, Rue Scribe. 

LEIPZIG — Handels-Zeitung fur die gesamte Uhren 
Industrie. 

BERLIN — Deutsche Uhrmacher Zeitung, Jager 
Strasse, 73. 

GENEVA — Journal Suisse D’Horlogerie. 

AMSTERDAM — Continental Club, Hotel Amstel. 
ANTWERP — Diamond Club, Rue de Pelican. 


Every line of reading matter in THE 
JEWELERS’ CrRCULAR-WEEKLT, with the 
exception of a few brief extracts from ex- 
changes, always properly credited, is written 
e xcln slvely for this journal. Each issue of 
THE JEWELERS’ CIRCULAR-WEEKLY is 
copyrighted. Permission to quote is extended 
to other publications provided st^cli;. quot^- 
Uons nre properly ore^ltb^. 


I T is with feelings of pride that we pre- 
sent to the trade this, our .32d Anniver- 
sarj’ Number. We will not enumerate the 
many special articles and other features 
that make this one of the finest editions 
ever issued from our office; but we will 
call attention to one feature, namely, the 
beautiful cover, which was designed upon 
our request by W. C. Codman. head of the 
designing department of the Gorham 
Mfg, Co. 

F orced liquida- 
tion at the open- 
January, 1900-1901. ing of the year is 
customary, and e.\- 
perience has taught that payments matur- 
ing on Jan. 1 disclose any weakness that 
may exist. This annual balancing of ac- 
counts tends to drive many unsuccessful 
firms out of business; either in December, 
when misfortune seems inevitable, or in 
January, after a final effort to secure ex- 
tension. When it is considered that the 
amount of defaulted indebtedness in Jan- 
uary, 1901, was less than the monthly aver- 
age for the entire j’ear 1900 — and the clos- 
ing months of last year were marred by 
severe reverses in many branches of trade 
and manufacture that threatened unusual 
difficulties at the turn of the year — there 
is much encouragement to be derived from 
a careful analysis of the record. In the 
trading class is comprised the large bulk of 
business houses that buy and sell without 
making their wares. This covers the large 
majority of firms in the United States, and 
a gratifying return here is of most impor- 
tance, since it touches the greatest num- 
ber of persons. Trading failures in Jan- 
uary. according to Dim's Review, were 
$767,241 less than a year previous, and but 
$41,512 larger than in January. 1899, which 
was the year of lowest failure rate. 
Among the traders designated as “jewelry 
and clocks,” there was $114,017 of indebt- 
edness in January, 1901, against $3-5-3, o5h 
in January. 1900. a most encouraging ex- 
hibit. 


Advantages of 
Labor Saving 
Machinery. 


A n English repre- 
sentative of in- 
dustrial firms in Bir- 
mingham. !Manches- 


ter and Northampton, sent to the United 
States to investigate the economies of ma- 
chinery over hand work, tells a story of in- 
terest to all manufacturers. The report of 
the investigations has just been published 
in the London Express. There is in it 
many things that are not generally known 
to Americans. The American ax, for in- 
stance, supplants the English ax, because 
the American ax, made by machinery, sells 
for $0 per dozen, while the English hand 
made ax, of no more enduring quality, sells 
for $20 per dozen. American machine 
made files are selling in England because 
the cost of manufacture by machinery is 
one-eighth the cost by hand. In the manu- 
facture of American jewelry, the labor on 
a certain type of gold brooch, which cost 
$1,435 per thousand by hand, costs only 
$118 by machinery. Every industry ^ in 
America has been invaded by machine 
economies, and the productive power of 
our factories and laborers has been greatly 
increased. In England the belief still ex- 
ists that machine economies are injurious 
to the wage earner. But while British 


manufacturers are clinging to antiquated 
machinery and tools and are reluctant to 
give up hand labor, because it is cheap, 
the United States is constantly improving 
her machinery and tools and is sending 
abroad more machinery every year. In 
summing up. the English investigator of 
American industrial methods declares that 
the captains of English industry must 
abandon old tools and methods, as the na- 
tion which is the best equipped wfith ma- 
chinery will take and retain the leading po- 
sition. The United States holds that posi- 
tion now and will undoubtedly retain it. 


F ROiM the fact that 
there are' but 
Factor of Credit, about tw’O billion dol- 
lars of currency in 
circulation in the United States, averag- 
ing about $26 for each person, it is very 
evident that credit is more necessary in the 
business world than the actual possession 
of currency. It is also a fact that about 95 
per cent, of all business transacted is by 
checks and drafts, substitutes for money 
and whose origin was based solely upoit 
confidence in commercial credit. Real and 
personal assets are but a factor in the crea- 
tion of credit, and while a substantial asset 
is desired, at the same time financially light 
business men need credit far in excess of 
their actual ability to pay should they be 
called upon to settle at a moment’s notice; 
therefore, it is necessary for the wholesale 
house or manufacturer to know the char- 
acter of the credit seeker, his paying habits, 
the probable prospect of his success and his 
business history. The records show much 
of the real assets of the credit seeker, but 
the hidden and most vital points, viz.; 
business character, paying habits and past 
history, are on the ledgers of the houses 
to w’hom he has gone for credit. The in- 
terchange of this information by credit 
men is commendable and of vast import- 
ance to all contributors of credit. This 
source of information produces facts and 
not opinions. Signed statements should 
be vigorously insisted upon at least once a 
year, either direct or through an agency. 
A system of interchange of complaints 
might be also arranged, using an agency 
as the bureau for recording and distributing 
same for the benefit of all interested, 
whereby the unsatisfactory and unbusiness- 
like methods of merchants would count 
against them, and the restriction of credit 
would necessitate the change of procedure, 
paying cash or going out of business, and 
the satisfactory business man would be en- 
couraged in the cultivation of credit which 
benefits both the contributor and seeker. 


Jewelry Salesman Robbed of Grip of 
Samples. 

PniL.tDELPHiA, Pa., Feb. 5. — Thomas L. 
Carson, a traveling jew'elry salesman — 
name of firm unknown — w'as given knock- 
out drops in the “Tenderloin” early this 
morning and robbed of a grip of sam- 
ple jewelry containing pieces valued at 
$-5fi0. His alleged assailants, Joseph 
Wright and William Crawford, have been 
arrested and were committed to jail at 
a hearing at Central Police Station this 
afternoon. They were held in d?faiilt of 
$1,500 bail each. 


5S 


THE JEWELERS’ CIRCULAR-WEEKLY. 


February 6, 1901. 


The English Jewelry Trade. 


London, Eng., Jan. 15. 

The year of 1900 was heralded by gloomy 
prognostications born of the dark tidings 
received from South Africa in December. 
1889. The moral certainty of a prolonga- 
tion of the war, involving increase of taxa- 
tion, prevalence of mourning, suspension of 
fashionable functions and other conditions 
detrimental to a trade intimately asso- 
ciated with the luxury and happiness of the 
people, predicted bad times in store for 
the jeweler and his confreres. The proph- 
ecy was amply fulfilled during the first 
half of the year. The rally, however, com- 
menced earlier than was anticipated. The 
relief of the beleagured garrisons at Kim- 
berley, Ladysmith and Mafeking produced 
an enormous rebound in the spirits of the 
nation and a corresponding reaction on 
business. The Autumn months showed 
inflated returns which, in many cases, 
'Ounterbalanced the slackness of the earlier 
>art of the year. 

The war itself produced a harvest of 
trade in topical or “patriotic” wares. 
Medals, souvenirs, photo framed pendants, 
trinkets of all sorts were sold in thousands. 
Many of them imported, hardly a percen- 
tage of more than ephemeral interest 
or worthy of permanent usage. Cheap, 
“flashy;” striking only because of their up- 
to-date-ness. Few manufacturers cared to 
go to much trouble or expense in produc- 
ing artistic work. Even in larger goods, 
such as clocks or cruet frames, the value 
\vas regulated by the fact that there was 


a probability of stocks becoming speedily 
obsolete. Still, while the fun lasted, it was 
fairly fast and furious. 

In presentation goods different condi- 
tions ruled, and a number of jewelers have 
turned out creditable work in the way of 
swords of honor, caskets for addresses, 
models of guns, and so forth. This branch 
will doubtless continue active for some 
time to come. 

The Paris Exposition created little ex- 
citement in jewelry trade circles. The 
English gold and silver crafts were in- 
adequately represented, and British makers 
generally boycotted the show. It may be 
fairly reckoned as one of England’s lost 
opportunities, and the benefit to our jew- 
elry and allied trades is perhaps best ex- 
pressed as a minus quantity. 

A new municipal Act of Parliament 
which came into force in the Autumn, in 
London, creating a number of mayoral- 
ties, has led to the ordering of chains of 
office, benefiting a select circle of firms. 

The enhanced price of silver has not 
prejudicially affected the silversmiths. In 
fact, they have been busier during the time 
it was highest. October and November 
were their best months in the year. A 
notable feature has been the increased pop- 
ularity of silver for ladies’ wear. Not, of 
course, brooches, bracelets or necklets — 
these are tabooed by all except the lower 
classes of consumers — but in buckles, 
clasps, chatelaines and buttons. Consid- 
erable pains and expense have been spent 
in the production of artistic designs — con- 
ventional ornaments, flowers and the 
human figure in relief predominating. The 


latest notion is to finish these wares dull 
instead of bright polished. The best work 
is cast; stamped and pierced or engraved 
work being less in demand. Wire pat- 
terns are mainly made up into cheaper 
lines. 

Gold jewelry shows few novelties. De- 
signers are feeling their way in the wake 
of Parisian jewelers in the production of 
j what is called “I’art nouveau,” but it is 
doubtful whether English tastes will be- 
I come accustomed to the boldness and free- 
i dom of the French ideas. In the limited 
\ sphere of men's jewelry the tie-clip is the 
! only innovation of the year. These are 
worn in pairs, the top (the only part visi- 
ble) being jeweled. Brooches are worn 
in profusion — all over the corsage, in fact 
— and are light and fragile. Hair orna- 
ments, earrings and skirt pins are also 
in vogue. The chain makers have had a 
good run of business, the long, muff 
chains being still verj- popular. The flat 
cedar-pencil holder — a comparatively new 
shape — has had a great sale, only being 
limited by the production. 

Over 800,000 silver watch cases were 
marked at the London, Birmingham and 
Chester Halls during the year ending 
June 30. Birmingham introduced a salu- 
j tary reform by refusing to hall-mark gold 
ware under a certain thickness of metal. 
The tissue-paper stuff formerly on sale — 
strengthened by solder — was a scandal, 
and although the sudden change caused 
inconvenience, the ultimate effect will be 
good. 

Platinum is abnormally high in value, 
equal to about 23-karat gold, and the rise 
will doubtless affect its use, as it can 
hardly compete with high quality gold in 
public esteem. For mounting diamonds 
and in welded gold and platinum work it 
will probably retain its position. Gold 
continues high in price on the market, but 
trade quotations have not been altered. 

Generally speaking, the lookout fo*- 1901 
in the jewelry and allied trades is distinctly 
hopeful. R. F. 


East Week’s New York Arrivals. 


THB CIRCUI.AR-WEEKI.T has perfecte<* 
arrangretneats for obtalulngr the names and 
hotel addresses of all the latest buyers vlsit- 
ln(j New York, and each day posts In Its office. 
II John St., cor. Broadway, a bulletin which 
every member of the trade Is cordially In- 
vited to copy. 


.VSHT^AND, PA., A. Poeber, Pabst. 

.'\LLENTO\VN, PA., E. H. Wetherhold, Union 
Square. 

BALTIMORE, MD., D. Oppenheimer, ilarlbor- 
ough. 

CHIC.^GO, ILL., S. C. Eppenstein, Grand. 

D.-\LLAS, TEX., J. Linz (Joseph Linz & Bro.), 
Imperial. 

LEB.\XOX, PA., F. B. Kendrick, Murray Hill. 

MIDDLETOWN. N. Y., J. K. Wiggins, Marl- 
borough. 

MONTREAL, CAN., W. M. Birks (H. Birks & 
Sons), New Amsterdam. 

PITTSBURGH, PA., S. L. Levinson, Astor. 

TORONTO, CAN., Thomas Marshall, Astor. 


William Kleinschmidt, of Kleinschmidt, 
Howland & Co., New York, sailed on the 
Campania, recently, for Europe, where he 
will buy such fine specimens of diamonds, 
sapphires and rubies as he may be able to 
find in the markets of London and Paris. 


ON MEMORANDUM 



Cross & Beguelin 


Importers and Cutters of Diamonds and Precious Stones 

43 Ru, d, MeUay. PARIS 2,JAcor°tlandt I J MuideU LaHe, N E]V Y O RK 



February 6, 1901. 


THE JEWELERS’ CIRCULAR-WEEKLY. 


59 


New York Notes. 

M. Kauffmann sailed for Europe last 
Wednesday on the Oceanic. 

Julius King, of the Julius King Optical' 
Co., and Mrs. King are at Orlando, Fla. 

Fishel, Nessler & Co. have removed their 
offices from 588 Broadway to 556 Broad- 
way. 

C. Francini, the expert maker of jewelry, 
has moved one door we^t, and is now at 
14 Maiden Lane. 

Avery & Brown suspended business, 
Tuesday of last week, on account of the 
death of Mr. Brown’s father. 

Alter Jorisch, who wa^ a retail jeweler 
some time ago, has been granted a dis- 
charge in bankruptcy in the United States 
District Court. 

The business of the late firm of Stone 
Bros., 532-534 Broadway, is now conducted 
by their successors under the style of 
David Stone & Son. 

S. B. Ross, of Malliet, Maxwell & Ross, 
who recently left for Europe, is at present 
in Amsterdam, where he will remain about 
five weeks, purchasing diamonds. 

H. Kohlbusch, Sr., manufacturer of 
scales and balances, who has been confined 
to his home by illness for several weeks, ’s 
now recovering and will shortly be at his 
office. 

The annual meeting of the Spencer Op- 
tical Mfg. Co. will be held next Wednes- 
day, at the company’s offices, 15 Maiden 
Lane, at noon, for the election of direc- 
tors, etc. 

Among the firms who suffered severely 
from the big East Side factory fire, Thurs- 
day, were J. B. Colt & Co., manufacturers 
of gas tanks, who were formerly in the 
optical business. 

At the second meeting of the creditors 
of Morris Aronov, bankrupt, held Friday, 
before N. A. Prentiss, referee in bank- 
ruptcy, 120 Broadway, several claims were 


proved and Henry S. J. Flynn, 132 Nassau 
St., was appointed trustee. 

Judge Brown, of the United States Dis- 
trict Court, has granted a discharge in 
bankruptcy to Henry W. Oliver, formerly 
a manufacturing jeweler at 15 Maiden 
Lane. His liabilities were $13,833. 

A mass meeting of journeymen jewelers 
of New York is announced for the evening 
of Feb. 14, at Odd Fellows Hall, 69 St. 
Mark’s Place. A representative of the 
American Federation of Labor will ad- 
dress the meeting. 

The bronze statuette presented to the 
22d Regiment, N. Y. N. G., of Brooklyn, 
entitled “The Volunteer,” in memory of 
the late Captain Frank I. Scott, was 
from Tiffany & Co. It is a fine example 
of American sculpture, the work of Fitz- 
gerald Peploe. 

Joseph Barkow, 8 Willett St., a jewelry 
peddler, was robbed one day last week, of 
$50 worth of goods. He says he was 
beaten and kicked by half a dozen men at 
448 E. 115th St. Nicolo Guigi and Gecono 
Botzo were in Harlem Court, the next day, 
on a charge of robbing him. They were 
held in $1,000 bail. 

The first meeting of the creditors of Lil- 
ienstern & Leake, bankrupt jobbers, form- 
erly at 475 Broadway, was held Friday 
before referee in bankruptcy Theodor Aub, 
149 Broadway. Nearly all the 100 credit- 
ors were present or represented. Severai 
claims were presented and proved. Joseph 
Nordenchilds was appointed trustee with 
bonds of $6,000. 

The partnership of H. C. Hardy & Co., 
importers of diamonds and precious 
stones, 24 Maiden Lane, has been renewed 
from Feb. 1 for one year. The general 
partners are Horace C. Hardy, Brooklyn; 
Henry E. Ide, Brooklyn, and John J. 
Fleiser, New York. Danford N. Barney, 
Farmington, Conn., is special partner and 


contributes $75,000 to the capital of the 
firm. 

The now famous “Maximillian crown 
jewels,” which never belonged to the 
Mexican Emperor at all, consisting of a 
diamond pendant containing a 33-karat 
stone surrounded by 1-karat stones and a 
4-karat diamond ring, seized here by Cus- 
toms Agent Theobald in November last, 
were sold Thursday in the office of United 
States Marshal Henkel, in the Federal 
building, by auctioneer Joseph Shongood. 
There were a dozen bidders and the jewels, 
even taking into consideration the fact that 
they are a bit off color and contain some 
flaws, sold at considerably less than ap- 
praised valuation. The pendant was sold 
to Joseph Frankel’s Sons, diamond mer- 
chants, John and Nassau Sts., for $2,000. 
The ring was sold to William Goldstone, 
pawnbroker, 87 Park Row, for $235. When 
the gems were seized they were in the pos- 
session of Valino M. Preza and Alejandro 
Marcuci, who had just come from the City 
of Mexico and were trying to dispose of 
them in this city. It was declared at the 
time that the diamonds were a part of the 
Crown jewels of the ill-fated Emperor 
Maximillian, of Mexico, but this statement 
was afterward disproved. Together with 
another ring similar to the one sold Thurs- 
day, the gems were said to be worth $60,- 

000. The appraised value set upon the pen- 
dant, however, was only $3,721, domestic 
valuation, and upon the rings $600 each. 
A short time ago the pendant and one of 
the rings were confiscated, the other ring 
being returned to Preza. At the same time 
the criminal action against the men, charg- 
ing them with smuggling, was dropped. 

Schedules in bankruptcy of A. S. and S. 

1. Koplik, formerly engaged in the jew- 
elry business at 106 W. 125th St., have 
been filed. Firm liabilities are shown 
amounting to $17,920, with no assets. 
Abraham S. Koplik has individual liabili- 








C. DORFLINQER & SONS, 

Manufacturers of Fine Glassware. 

EVERYTHING IN PLAIN AND CUT CRYSTAL FOR THE TABLE. 


915 Broadway, 


NEW YORK. 


36 Murray Street. 














1851 . 


1901 . 


TheChatham National Bank, New York. 


CAFITAL STOCK, 
UNDIVIDED PROFITS, - 


t H. P. DOREMUS, Cashier. 


GEO. 31. HARD, President. 


$450,000 

980,000 


TV. H. STRAIVN, Ass’t Cashier. 










60 


THE JEWELERS’ CIRCULAR-WEEKLY, 


February 6, 1901. 


ties of $S,000 on mortgages and nominal as- 
sets — amount unknown — consisting of an 
estate for his own life in property 251 E. 
32d St., mortgaged for $8,000, and a third 
interest in personalty of the estate of R. 
Koplik, deceased. Samuel I. Koplik has 
individual liabilities $8,315. of which $8,000 
is on mortgages, and assets, value un- 
known. consisting of a third interest in | 
remainder in property, 251 E. 32d St., and 
a two-thirds interest in personal property 
left by R. Koplik. Among the creditors 
are: Emanuel L. Anrich, $526; J. T. Scott 
& Co.. $100; Thomas W. Adams & Co., 
$151; Tarrant & Gismond, $103; George 
R. Scofield, $300; Dattelbaum & Fried- 
man. $251; Goldsmith & Co.. $400; E. A. 
Haldimann, $200; Kent & Stanley, $107; 
Keller, Ettinger & Fink, $125; A. C. Van 
Benschotten, $128; J. R. Wood & Sons, 
$300; Albert Freund, $226; Enos Richard- 
son & Co., $336; Morris Prager & Co., 
$2,049: Ernest Adler, $200; Henry S. Her- 
zog, $308; E. Ira Richards & Co.. $115; 
Jules Racine & Co., $386; John Dissel- 
koen, $450. An account of the affairs of 
this concern was published in The Cir- 
cul.\r-Weekly. Dec. 5, 1900. 

L. & ^I. Kahn & Co. will move into the 
Corbin building about May 1. 

Goldstein & Xewman, 296 Grand St., 
have been succeeded b 3 ' IMax Goldstein, 
who has bought his partner's interest. 

The World, Sunday, contained a dispatch 
from London to the effect that increase in 
the price of diamonds was, in most part, 
due to the great demand from this countrj'. 

Among the members of the February 
Grand Jury, now in session, are two jew- 
elers: Bernard Karsch, 641 Eighth Ave., 

and Andrew P. Xahmens, 262 W. 125th 
St. 

The Brooklyn Eagle. Feb. 3, contained a 
long article on the diamonds of the world, 
in which appeared a column interview on 
the subject with Ludwig Xissen, of Lud- 
wig Xissen & Co. 

The third annual entertainment and re- 
ception of the Buyers’ Association of 
.America will be held at Sherry’s. Fifth 
Ave. and 44th St., the night of Feb. 14, for 
members and ladies. 

The business conducted bj^ S. \V. Mc- 
Donald, 26 W. 23d St., has been incorpor- 
ated as the McDonald-Heyward Co., who 
will continue in the retail jewelry trade. 
The capital is $100,000. 

Samuel Buckley & Co., 100 William St., 
have opened an office at 34 Holborn Via- 
duct, London, for the convenience of 
.American purchasers of European silver 
ware, clocks, potteries, precious stones, etc. 

The only replica in .America of the 
key of the Queen’s tomb is in the pos- 
session of Mrs. Murdoch .A. MacDonald, 
of Xewark, the widow of a former Xcw- 
ark jeweler, the man who made it 40 
years ago, while in the employ of one of 
the largest jewelry firms in London. 

The following cases which were on the 
calendar of the United States Circuit 
Court of .Appeals for trial this month, all 
involving the classification of precious and 
semi-precious stones, have been put over 
until May 21, at request of defendants’ 
counsel: United States vs. Rud. C. Hahn; 
United States vs. Rud. C. Hahn; United 
States vs, Rud. C. Hahn, 


-A young man of good appearance, 19 
>-ears old, who refused to give his name 
to the police, was arrested after an exciting 
chase in Madison .Ave., Monday night, and 
fierce resistance on his part, charged with 
robbing E. W. Dayton, dealer in antiques. 
Madison .Ave. and 60th St. He had upon 
him five antique rings, a scarf pin and 
some pawn tickets in the name of Smith 
for jewelry. 

Henry McDonald, for eight years ship- 
ping clerk for the Gorham Mfg. Co., 21 
I^Iaiden Lane, was held by Magistrate 
Poole in $1,000 for the Grand Jury, yester- 
day morning, on the charge of grand lar- 
ceny of $27, received by him several days 
ago for a C. O. D. package. McDonald 
was arrested by Detective-Sergeant Nu- 
gent, Saturday night. It is alleged that 
McDonald is responsible for losses of be- 
tween $300 and $400, which have been no- 
ticed during the past six months. 

.A critic says of an actress who has been 
a star at the New York Theatre: "Miss 

Farrington wears three and a quarter 
pounds of diamonds of such scintillating, 
piercing brilliancy that the lights are 
turned out during the greater part of the 
act. in order to save electrical bills and 
the eyes of the audience. Miss Farring- 
ton's diamonds make those of Lady Fran- 
cis Hope (which were referred to in The 
Circul.\r-Weekly recently) look like a 
glow worm in a blast furnace.” 

The silver album, illustrated and de- 
scribed in The Circular— Weekly, Jan. 
23, which is to be presented to Emperor 
William, of Germany, as a form of thanks 
from the Northeastern Saengerbund for 
his prize of a silver statuette competed for 
at the Brooklyn Saengerfest, last July, was 
on public exhibition at the Lexington 
Opera House, Sunday. The Emp ror's 
prize was also shown. The album will be 
forwarded to the Emperor through the 
German .Ambassador at Washington, in a 
few daj'S. 

The gang of Italian counterfe'ters, whose 
arrest a month ago was caused through 
the suspicions of Charles S. Pratt, gold 
and silver refiner and assayer, 29 Gold 
St., as told in The Circular-WYekly 
at the time, were found guilty in the Crim- 
inal Part of the United States Circuit 
Court, last Thursday, and sentenced to 
long terms of imprisonment. .Achilles 
Sieroo, leader of the gang, received the 
heaviest sentence, 10 j'ears. Michael 

Chicherio, who is a silversmith by trade, 
was sentenced to seven years’ imprison- 
ment. 

Charles Guerin, the Chilian jeweler who 
was robbed of $5,000 worth of jewels in 
the “Tenderloin.” Nov. 21, by a man and 
a woman expert at what is known as the 
“badger game,” has been confined in the 
House of Detention since that time as a 
witness. He does not like it and has 
written and talked much in his efforts 
to be set free to return home. But the 
authorities have held him as the leading 
witness. The woman. Emma ^McCarthy, 
has been found guilty, and more convic- 
tions are expected. The jewels have not 
been located. 

The Merchants’ .Association of New 
York have secured reduced fares on rail- 
roads in the territories of the Central Pas- 


senger .Association and the Trunk Line 
.Association, except from points less than 
100 miles from New York, at the rate 
full fare coming and one-third fare return- 
ing. The rates in the C. P. .A. territory, 
including Niagara Falls, Buffalo, Pitts- 
burgh, Wheeling, Louisville, St. Louis, 
Chicago, etc., are good from Feb. 13 to 
17 and March 1 to 4, inclusive. The rates 
in the T. L. .A. territory, including Niag- 
ara Falls, Buffalo, Pittsburgh, Wheeling, 
etc., are good from March 16 to 21 and 
.April 3 to 6, inclusive. 

The salesmen and especially the collec- 
tors for jewelry- firms doing business with 
residents of the East Side have had their 
work made harder and more dangerouj 
by the murder of iMeyer Weisbard, the 
jewelry salesman whose body was found in 
a trunk some weeks ago. One salesman 
had two men arrested for robbing him of 
a watch, six rings and three pairs of ear- 
rings while he was showing goods in a 
house. .A collector reported to his em- 
ploj'era that he was locked in a room 
where he went to collect a bill and forced 
to hand over a watch and chain. .Another 
man was made to sign a receipt in full for 
a bill of $41 he tried to collect, without re- 
ceiving any money. Manj- robbery stories 
of this sort are heard on the East 
Side, and some of them are undoubtedly 
true. The mystery of the Weisbard mur- 
der has not been solved by the police. 

To the Grand ^Marshal and the members 
of his staff in the Sound IMoney Parade of 
last Fall have been presented handsome 
souvenirs of that event by the Mauser 
Mfg. Co., who made them. The souven- 
irs are in the form of escutcheons, silver 
mounted on solid oak panels. In the cen- 
ter are two medallions, one of Mr. Mc- 
Kinley and the other of IMr. Roosevelt. In 
high relief across the top is an eagle, with 
a scroll on which is engraved: “Sound 

Mone%' Parade, 1900.” Below the meda' 
is an ornamental sterling silver plate, upon 
which are engraved the names of the 64 
aides. The.wJiole affair is 24 inches high 
and 18 inches wide. The presentation was 
made at a dinner of the Grand Marshal 
and staff, at the .Armj' and Navy Club. 
Saturday, the recipients being: General 

.Anson G. McCook, Grand Marshal; Major 
.A. Noel Blakeman. Chief of Staff; Major 
George DeF. Barton, Chief of .Aides; 
Charles Curie, Jr., Quartermaster; Gen- 
eral A. W. Day, Commander of Rear 
Guard. 


Trans=Allaiitic Voyagers. 


TO EUROPE. 

Leo Goldsmith, New A'ork; N. Kauff- 
mann. New York: F. D. M’aterman, of the 
L. E. M'aterman Co., New A^ork, and W. 
Elder Marcus, of Marcus & Co., New 
A'ork. sailed M'ednesday on the Oceanic. 

FROM EUROPE. 

J. Stuart AlacDonald. Baltimore. Md,. 
accompanied by his wife, returned recently 
on the Oceanic. 

B. H. Davis, of B. H. Davis & Co.. New 
A'ork; L. H. Goldsoll, of London; H. E. 
Oppenheimer. of H. E. Oppenheinier & 
Co.. New A'ork, and W. N. Walker, of 
Hayden W. Wheeler & Co., New York, 
returned last week on the Lucanta, 




February G, 1901. 


THE JEWELERS’ CIRCULAR-WEEKLY. 


61 




Quality, 


You can most always get first quality if you 
pay a high price. Sometimes you can get it at a 
moderate price. Improved methods of manufacturing 
and selling can lower price without affecting quality 
and enable you to buy first-class goods at what you 
had been paying for inferior kinds. 

This is the story of the “Elite” Hall Clock 
Movement — a first quality article at a low price. We 
make only one grade — a standard. You never, for 
instance, see our Westminster Chime Movement 
graded like this ; I., Extra; 11., First Quality ; III., 

Ordinary ; IV., Cheap Quality. No ! Did you ever 
hear of a 11., 111. and IV. quality Steinway piano ? 
You didn’t, because they make but one grade — a 
standard. That stands for the best there is. Same way 
with “Elite” movements — one kind, the best there is. 

Our movement equals in quality of time-keeping, 
tone, solidity and looks the highest-priced movement 
called “Extra” by other makers and costs less than 
their so-called “Cheap Quality.” We’re ready to 
prove it to all comers. Import orders now being 
taken. 

BAWO & DOTTER, 

“ ELITE CLOCKS AND 
ELITE'' CHINA, ^ ^ 

26 to 32 Barclay St,, New York, 


G2 


THE JEWELERS’ CIRCULAR-WEEKLY. 


February 6, 1901. 


INDEX TO ADVERTISEnENTS. 


Adelphi Silver Plate Co 

Adler. L., & Son 

Ahrenfeldt, Chas., & Son 

Aikin, Lambert & Co 

Aikin, Lambert Jewelry Co. 
Alford. C. G., & Co. 


79 

39 

IM 

103 

103 

65 

Allen. Benj., & Co 

Allen & Jonassobn 1^2 

American Waltham Watch Co 56 

American Watch Case Co 84 

.Arnstein Bros. & Co 83, 112 

Attleboro Chain Co 

Austin, John, & Son 

Averbecic. M. J 25, 26, 27, 28 

Avery & Brown 54 

Azure Mining Co Inside Back Cover 

98 

no 

95 

Ill 

61 


103 

109 

21 

10 

82 

22 

20 

63 


Ballou, B. A., 6S: Co 
Bank, John A., & Bro.... 

Barlow Mfg. Co 

Bassett Jewelry Co 

Bawo & Dotter 

Bell Watch Co 

Berge, J. & H 

Bergen, J. D.. Co 

Bigney, S. O., & Co 

Billings, Chester, & Son.. 

Blair Fountain Pen Co... 

Bonner & Co 

Bowden, J. B., & Co 

Bowman, Ezra F., School 

Bradley Polytechnic Institute 2 

Bryant, M. B., & Co 

Buckley, SamT, & Co 

Chatham National Bank 

Chicago College of Optics 

Citroen, S. C., & Co 

Codding & Heilborn Co 

Cohn, J. J • 

Columbus Watch Co 

Cook, Edward N 

Crescent Watch Case Co 

Cross & Beguelin 

Crossman, Charles S., & Co 

Day, Clark & Co 

Deitsch Bros 

De Lara, D. C 

Demarest & Eckerson 

Diamond Point Pen Co 

Diamond Tag Co 

Dominick & Half 

Dorflinger, C., & Sons 

Dubois Watch Case Co 

Dwenger, Charles L 

Eaton & Glover Co 

Eichberg & Co 

Eisenmann Bros 

Eliassof Bros. & Co 

Fahys, Joseph, & Co 

Field & Beattie 

Foster, Theodore W., & Bro. Co. 

Fox, Gustave, Co 

Francis, A. E 

Francis 8c. Hall 

Frankel’s Sons, Joseph 

Freund, Henry, & Bro 

Friedlander, K., L. 8c M 

Frolichstein 8c England 

Garreaud Sc Griser 

Gattle, Ettinger 8c Hammel 

Gattle, H. 


83 
,. 42 
, . 59 
.. 94 
. . 74 
.. 47 
. . 82 
. . 68 
. . Ill 
. . 15 
58, 67 
.. 52 
10, 46 
.. 47 
.. 102 
.. 78 
.. 84 
. . 76 
.. 22 
.. 59 
.. 84 
.. 106 
.. 77 
.. 39 
.. 39 
.. 79 
.. 103 
.. 103 
.. 2 


, . . . 96 
, . . . 82 
, . . . 39 
. . . . 41 
.... 112 
. . . . 72 
.... 103 
.38, 112 
35 


Gerard, Dufraisseix 8c Abbot 108 

Geneva Optical Co 91 

Glaenzer Freres 8c Rheinboldt 107 

Golnner, S 95 

Goldsmith, C. P., 8c Co 19 

Goldsmith, Leo 37, 112 


Goodfriend Bros 

Gorham -\lfg. Co 

Grinberg, Adolf J., Co 

Haack, John 

Harris 8c Harrington 

Haskell, H. C 

Hayward, Walter E 

Hedges, William S., 8c Co. 

Heintz Bros 

Henochsberg, J. A 

Hermann 8c Co 

Flerschede, Frank 

Hirsh 8c Hyman 

Hooper, George E 

Howard Sterling Co 

Hraba, Louis Vv' 

Illinois Case Co.. 

Illinois Watch Case Co.... 

Imperial Mfg. Co 

International Silver Co 

Jackson Bros 

Jacot Music Box Co 

Jewelers’ Court 

Jurgensen. Jules 


37 

51 
40 

2 

112 

95 

111 

34 
22 
74 
72 
49 

35 

111 

52 
84 

72 
74 

73 

. 16 
95 
103 
102 
. 68 


Kahn. L. & M., & Co 1^2 

Kaufman, Loui<?, & Co 18 

Kent Sc Woodland 2 

Keystone ^^'atch Case Co. .. .Outside Rack Cover 

Klein Bros 

Klein, F. C., & Bro 72 

Kleinschmidt, Howland & Co 35 

Knowles. Dr 

Knowles, J. B. Sc S. M., Co 22 

Kohlbusch, Herman, Sr 30 

Kohn, Alois, & Co 1^2 

Krementz & Co ^ 

Krider, Peter L., Co 79 

Barter, Elcox & Co 

Belong, L., & Bro H2 

Bewis, Fred. W., & Co 34 

Bindenberg & Fox 

Bissauer & Co 2 

Boeb, William, & Co 1^3 

Borsch, Albert, & Co H2 

MacDonald, Pirie 9^ 

Malliett, Maxwell & Boss 

Mann, Ignatz 

Manby, Sydney J 

Marx & Brod 

Mathey Bros., Mathez & Co HI 

Mauser Mfg. Co 53 

Mendes Diamond Cutting Factories 10 

Mercantile National Bank 78 

Meriden Britannia Co 10 

Mossberg & Granville Mfg. Co 87 

Mount & Woodhull 35 

Murray, Dan 1 52 

Myers, S. F., Co 08 

Neresheimer Sc Co 39 

Nimschke, B. W 52 

Noble, F. H., & Co 7a 

Noterman, Jos., & Co 75 

Omega Watches 09 

Oppenheimer Bros, & Veith 37 

Oppenheimer, H. E., & Co 112 

Ostby & Barton Co 8 

Pairpoint Corporation lOG 

Patek, Philippe & Co 40 

Philadelphia Watch Case Co SO 

Pitzele Sc Basclikopf 82 

Ponzoni, C 2 

Providence Stock Co HI 

Racine, Bady, Watches 98 

Rauch & Goldsmith 75 

Reddall, John W., & Co 22 

Reinewald, Henry 2 

Reisner, B. C., Sc Co 3 

Revell, A. H., & Co H2 

Robert, E. E 67 

Rogers, Simeon B., & George IB, Co 2d Cover 

Roseman, A 37 

Rumpp, C. F., Sc Sons 103 

Saunders, John F 34 

Schimpf, John, Sc Sons 79 

Schulz & Rudolph 68 

Scott, S. C., Mfg. Co 66 

Search-Bight Mfg, Co 76, 94 

Sherwood, John W., Sc Co 44 

Simmons, R. F., Co 45 

Simons, Bro. Sc Co 29 

Smith, Alfred H., Sc Co ^ 32, 40 

Spencer, E. B., Sc Co HO 

Stern Bros. Sc Co 31 

Sternau, S., Sc Co 81 

St. Bouis Button Co 75 

Strasburger’s Son, Bouis, & Co 

Strauss, Ignaz, Sc Co 

Strauss, Jacob, Sc Sons 

Street, George O., & Sons 

Suffolk Watch Co 

Sussfeld, Borsch Sc Co 

Towle Mfg. Co 

Trenton Watch Go 

Troescher, C. A 

Trout, Charles B., Sc Co 

Valfer, S., & Co 

Van Reeth, Constant 

V'atier, Ernest 

V. T. F. Watch Glasses 


Special Notices. 

Ratee 75c. per lasertlon for notices not ex- 
ceeding 3 lines (as words); additional words 
a cents each. Payable Invariably in advance. 

Display cards on this page $3.00 per Inch. 

Under the heading of SITUATIOKS 
WANTBD on this page, advertisements will 
be Inserted for One Cent a Word, each inser- 
tion. Minimum charge, as cents. This offer 
refers to SITUATIONS WANTBD ONDY. 
Payable In advance. 

In all cases if answers are to be forwarded, 
10 cents extra to cover postage must be en- 
closed. 


Wallace, K., 8c Sons Mfg. Co 6 

Warner & Swasey Co 94 

Washburn, George W M 

VVells, Chester H f “5 

West Silver Co _. *>4 

Wheeler, Hayden W., & C 0...1 6b 

White, W'm. A., & Sons 63 

White, N. H., & Co ^ 

Whiting 8c Davis > 

Whiting Mfg. Co 

Wicke & Co 

Wittnauer, A 43 

Woodcock, W. F. A ”6 

Wood, John K., & Sons ’ 

Woods & Chatellier 


w 


Sltuationa Manteb. 


ANT WORK, by a good watchmaker. Fred. 
Lomberg, New Haven, Mo. 


ANTED — Position by young man as assistant 
watchmaker; can give references. C. Walton 
Phillips, Tiptonville, Tenn. 

l^ATCHMAKER — Good all around repairer 
wants position; city preferred; wages mod- 
erate; references furnished. C. Moran, 242 E. 128th 
St.. New York. 


ANTED — Permanent position by a first-class 
*• watchmaker; fine set of tools; best of ref- 
erences. Address, “Permanent,” care Jewelers’ 
Circular-Weekly. 


A FIRST CLASS WATCHMAKER with best 
references, over 25 years’ experience, wishes 
a position with a good concern. .Address, E. A., 
care Jewelers’ Circular-Weekly. 


XT' OUNG MAN of 25 desires position with whole- 
44 saler or manufacturer; city or office work; 
well known to the trade. Address, Al. E. Wood, 
406 W. 45th St., New York City. 


Tj'IRST CLASS DESIGNER of jewel^ (diamond 
4- or other fancy lines) desires a position; would 
also do other work in factory office. .Address, K. 
L., care Jewelers’ Circular-Weekly. 


1X7 ANTED — Position by a youth, 19, who has 
had some experience in a Maiden Lane dia- 
mond house; good recommendation. Address, 
“Cedric,” care Jewelers’ Circular-Weekly. 


30 


pOAIPETENT WATCHMAKER, good engraver 
and jewelry jobber; 14 years’ experience; 
three years on railroad watches; full set of tools; 
good reference. Address, 106 5th Ave. E., Ashland, 
Wis. 

PRACTICAL WATCHMAKER, 10 years’ ex- 
-4- perience. desires a change; Al references; good 
salesman; can engrave some; railroad watch ex- 
perience. Address, R. M., care Jewelers’ Circular- 
Weekly. 

SITUATION WANTED to finish the trade by a 
^ watch repairer, jeweler and engraver; three 
years’ experience; age 22; owns all tools; Al refer- 
ences. George Lexington, 722 N. Church St., De- 
catur, 111. 

S alesman, competent and trustworthy, thor- 
oughly acquainted with the retail jewelry trade 
from Philadelphia west to Denver, is open for posi- 
tion to travel. Address, M. A. M., care Jewelers’ 
Circular-W eekly. 

ATCHMAKER, jeweler, refractionist and plain 
engraver wishes to engage with some jew- 
eler who can appreciate the services of a good, 
honest, sober man; tools, trial case. Address, 
“Ind,” care Jewelers’ Circular-Weekly. 

A A’OUNG man, capable of doing most all 
kinds of watch and clock repairing, includ- 
ing lathe work, also good plain engraver, desires 
a steady position; salary reasonable. Address, B. 
E. O., care Jewelers’ Circular-Weekly. 

W ANTED — By an experienced and well-known 
salesman, a manufacturer’s line to sell to 
department stores and jobbers: New York and 

vicinity, including New England, if desired. .Ad- 
dress, S. C., care Jewelers’ Circula r-Weekly. 

H onest, sober young man, age 20, five years’ 
experience, wishes position with Al watch- 
maker and engraver to finish trade; graduate op- 
tician; own lathe and tools; best references; no 
bad habits. Address, “253,” care Jewelers’ Circular- 
Weekly. 




Fe'bruary 6, 1901. 


THE JEWELERS’ CIRCULAR-WEEKLY. 


63 


SITUATIONS WANTED-Continued. 


CITUATION WANTED — By a good watch- 
maker to finish the trade; three years’ experi- 
ence; graduate optician; excellent salesman; 
speaks the Finnish and English languages; A1 
references; salary, $15 per week. Address, J. E. 
H., care Jewelers’ Circular-Weekly. 


ANTED — A bright, snappy material man in a 
''' wholesale material and jewelry house; one 
capable of making himself generally useful; good 
penman and capable of building up himself and 
business; must be competent to fill material or- 
ders exact; salary $15 per week, with chance for 
advancement; no attention paid to answers from 
others than experienced material men. Address, 
“Boston,” care Jewelers’ Circular-Weekly. 


TS/" ANTED— By a young man of 28 years, a 
'' position as traveling salesman for a manu- 
facturing jeweler; is well acquainted with first- 
class trade on the line of N. Y. Central R. R. and 
west of Buffalo and Pittsburgh. Address, “Wal- 
lace,” care Jewelers’ Circular-Weekly. 


TpIRST-CLASS DESIGNER and engraver, 20 
-It years’ experience, desires position with relia- 
ble concern; monograms a specialty; fine work, 
such as chasing, cutting for enamel for emblems, 
and cutting on steel for dies. Address, “Mono- 
gram,” care Jewelers’ Circular-Weekly. 


A PARTY thoroughly acquainted with depart- 
ment store trade in New York City, particu- 
larly, wants a suitable line of goods to sell on 
commission or would accept a salaried position 
with manufacturer. Address, B. S., care L. S. 
Meyer & Bro., 38 Maiden Lane, New York. 


E xpert watchmaker and optician; fine 

engraver; would like a steady position with a 
good firm; age 30; have had 14 years’ practical 
experience; have tools and trial case; state sal- 
ary and particulars in first letter; A1 references. 
Address, “Watchmaker,” care Jewelers’ Circular- 
Weekly. 


Bueineae ©pportunities. 


T BUY JEWELRY STOCKS— Retailers wish- 
ing to dispose of surplus or entire stock of dia- 
monds, watches and jewelry will find me a quick, 
cash, strictly confidential buyer. Gus. Bronner, 
22 and 24 Lispenard St., New York city. 


[TOR SALE — Jewelry store, stock and fixtures; 
^ will sell at a bargain at once; nice clean goods 
and fine safe; good reasons for selling. Address, 
Charles Remillet, Findlay, O. . 


$6 


non STORE, clean, new stock, 

^UUU well established, to trade for store 


property; must be clear. Address, “West New 
York,” care Jewelers’ Circular-Weekly. 


^ 1 0 non jewelry STO'CK and fixtures; 

well established, new and up-to-date 
stock, in a city of 2,500 population, western New 
York; to trade for New York State improved busi- 
ness property; must be clear. Address, “Real 
Estate,” care Jewelers’ Circular-Weekly. 


tlo %et 


^AFFICES, large and small; also for light manu* 
facturing ; rents low. Knapp building, 41 and 
43 Maiden Lane, New York. 


[A ESK ROOM to let in Lorsch building, 37 Mai- 
den Lane; representative of Providence jew- 
elry house desirable. Kaufman & Poley, 37 Mai- 
den Lane, New York. 


Attention, Salesmen. 

Wanted, experienced jewelry salesmen to thor- 
oughly canvass one or two of the following States: 
Michi|:an, Wisconsin, Missouri, Kansas, Nebraska, 
with Side Line of Alarm Clocks to be sold in lots 
of 100, assorted if desired. Retailers never bought 
clocks as low as you can offer them. Address, 
“Alarm,” care Jewelers’ Circular-Weekly, room 
414, 134 Van Buren St., Chicago, 111. 


Loans on Diamonds 

in any amount at legal interest 
and no commission. 

Address, “INTEREST,” 

Care JEWELERS’ Circular-Weekly. 


1belp Manteb. 


ANTED — First class watchmaker, a good all 
''' around man. Apply, L. H. K., care Jewelers’ 
Circular-W eekly. 

ANTED — First class cabinet maker on silver 
ware chests. Address, “X47,” care Jewelers’ 
Circular-Weekly, 134 ^’an Buren St., Chicago, 111. 

ANTED — Young man, practical watchmaker, 
’’ jeweler and salesman; must know his busi- 
ness. Answer, giving full particulars, C. G. Theil- 
ing & Co., Laurens, S. C. 


ANTED — First class foreman capable of 
taking entire charge of jewelry case factory. 
Address, “X47,” care Jewelers’ Circular-Weekly, 
134 Van Buren St., Chicago, 111. 


ANTED — Reliable watchmaker, for the old es- 
tablished jewelry house of Benjamin J. 
Mayo, 887 Broad St., Newark, N. J. State 
married or single and wages wanted. 


A GOOD OPPORTUNITY for a young man 
who is well acquainted with both the New 
York jobbing trade and local retail trade. Ad- 
dress, “Knowledge,” care Jewelers’ Circular- 
Weekly. 


ANTED — Ten first class salesmen to carry as 
a side line our well known gold filled rings; 
liberal commission; deposit of $50 required for 
samples. Address, Arnstine Bros. Sl Mier, 50 Euc- 
lid Ave., Cleveland, O. 


ANTED — A first class watchmaker at once; 
must be first class on railroad watches and 
a good helper all around; proper salary to the 
right man; reference required. Address, Samuel 
H. Friedman, Rising Sun, Md. 


ANTED — Watchmaker, engraver, jeweler, all- 
around helper; $12 per week, steady job, 
nice town, New York State; send sample of en- 
graving, photo and full particulars. Address, D. 
E., care Jewelers’ Circular-Weekly. 


• AN EXPERIENCED diamond and watch buyer 
with $10,000 capital can find a golden op- 
portunity with a house of unquestionable reputa- 
tion; object installment business. Address, M. 
W. M. K., care Jewelers’ Circular-Weekly. 


ANTED — A first-class watchmaker of good 
appearance to do high-class work on plain 
and complicated watches; must have A1 reference; 
position permanent, with proper salary to right 
man. Address, Coleman E. Adler, New Orleans, 
La. 


■pTOK SALE — On account of my wife’s sickness, 
I must move her south, seeking her health; 
so, pending the above misfortune, I will sell out 
my jewelry store at a big bargain; finest location 
in Titusville, also the best store room in the city. 
Address all communications to J. J. Borne, Titus- 
ville, Pa. 


prOR SALE — Up-to-date jewelry and optical 
business; county seat; stock and fixtures, 
$3,000 to $4,000; can be reduced; established 15 
years; only jewelry and optical store in county; 
your own price for repairs and goods; fine busi- 
ness; southern Kentucky; good reasons for sell- 
ing. Address, “Elk,” care Jewelers’ Circular- 
W eekly. 


prOR SALE— ONLY JEWELRY and optical. 

business in town of 2,400; oil and gas belt; 
three glass, straw board and large steel tubing 
factories; commercial club negotiating for others; 
good location, brick building, expenses low, doing 
good business; invoice, $1,600; can reduce; gladly 
answer further inquiries if you mean business and 
have the cash. Address at once, L., care Jewelers’ 
Circular-W eekly. 


for Sale. 


\\7ATER MOTORS for running jewelers’ lathes 
' and light machinery; send stamps for cir- 
cular. S. W. Barton, Philmont, N. Y. 


F or sale — a bargain, a complete set of jew- 
elers’ fixtures, consisting of wall and coun- 
ter cases, tables, brackets, safe, etc. For particu- 
lars write to Blocher Bros., Frederick, Md. 


Manteb to purchase. 


Y^ANTED — Wall cases for displaying 
’ ’ silverware by New York city firm. 
Address, with full particulars, stating 
price, dimensiO ’S, etc., B. D.,careJew= 
elers’ Circular=WeekIy. 


LOFT TO LET 

with or without power. 

Very desirable for Jewelers or Silversmiths. 

DEITSCH BROS., 

14 E. 17th St., New York. 


2 More Departments Added. 

npTIPC With a Scientific Eye Specialist of 20 years’ 

Ur IIUu practice, chiefiy in Philadelphia and San 
Francisco, as Instructor. 

JEWELRY REPAIRING facturing Jeweler of 25 

years’ experience as In- 
structor. 

The new departments are equipped for giving the 
same high-class service which has for some time 
past characterized our teaching of 

WATCHM&KIN6 and ENGRAVING. 

. The 1,400 square feet of additional floor space, 
which the growth of our School recently made 
necessary, are rapidly filling up. The merits of 
our School are becoming known and appreciated. 
Take a course witli us — THK POSITION 
IS AVAITING FOR YOU, usually five to ten 
places tor each pupil who takes a full course with 
us. Write for prositectus. 

XHB 

Ezra F. Bowman Technical School, 

LANCASTER, PA. 


Watchmaking, Optical and 
Engraving. 

Winona, Minn. W. F. A. Woodcock 



T© LET. 

TWO STORES and BASEMENTS, TOGETHER or SEPARATELY, 

Anderson Building, 12-16 John St., 


ANTED — A first=class traveler, well 
acquainted with the gold jewelry 
trade in New England, New York State 
and Pennsylvania ; must have good rec= 
ommendations. Address, “ New Eng= 
land,” care Jewelers’ Circular- Weekly. 


Suitable for Je-welry, 
Electric Light 

Apply to WM. 

Telephone, 248a Cortlandt. 


Clocks or Silverware, 
and Steam Heat. 

A. WHITE & SONS. 

115 Broadway, New York. 


64 


February 6, 1901. 


THE JEWELERS’ CIRCULAR-WEEKLY. 


News Gleanings. 

Peck & Garing, Denison, Tex., have 
decided to dissolve. 

M. Polsky, Lincoln, Neb., has given a 
quit claim deed for $500. 

B. Colman, Des Moines, la., has 
given a bill of sale for $150. 

E. C. Carpenter. Ireton, la., has given 
a realty mortgage for .$1,500. 

R. R. Smiser has gone out of the jew- 
elry business in Ponca, Okla. 

H. M. Seaman has discontinued his jew- 
elry business in St. Joseph. Mo. 

A. Hahn is selling out his stock of jew- 
elry in Albion, Neb., at auction. 

M. Myon, Oklahoma City, Okla., has 
given a chattel mortgage for $120. 

S. \V. Goldwater, Pocatello, Idaho, has 
sustained a considerable fire loss. 

Edward Sutter, Russell, Kan., has re- 
ceived a warrant}" deed for $1,800. 

Fred Burnett, Dubuque, la., returned 
last week from a trip to Chicago. 

Louis Perrenaud, Humboldt, Kan., has 
given a realty mortgage for $1,140. 

Myron B. Odell, Hudson, S. Dak., has 
given a chattel mortgage for $139. 

Miller Stevens, Kansas City, Mo., has 
received a warranty deed for $9,000. 

Charles A. Leach, McCook, Neb., has 
given a realty conveyance for $1,700. 

C. A. Kendall has bought out the jew- 
elry stock of Elmer Smith, Earlville, la. 

E. T. Marsh, who recently located at 
Duncombe, la., has moved from that 
town. 

J. B. Sheets, Blackwell, Okla., has 
given a realty conveyance for a considera- 
tion of $250. 

The dissolution is reported of the old 
jewelry firm of Forester & Frizelle, Bil- 
lings, Mont. 

E. J. George, Fairfield, la., has moved 


his stock to the Slagle & Acheson block, 
in that town. 

L. H. Mathner has succeeded to the 
stock of jewelry, etc., of Mathner Bros., 
Beaumont, Tex. 

Burglars recently entered the store of 
Fisk & Son, Rowen, la., and secured $200 
worth of goods. 

Fred I. Liudgren, Ogden, la., has 
given a realty mortgage for $550 and paid 
off one amounting to $250. 

W. G. Miller, formerly of Columbus 
Junction, la., is starting in the jewelry 
business at West Liberty, la. 

Joseph Davis, Spokane, Wash., has 
given a chattel mortgage for $100 and a 
bill of sale for $75 on fixtures. 

Fred Linde, a jeweler of Donaldson- 
ville. La., is one of the inventors of an 
electrical process for killing the water hy- 
acinth. 

The Evans Alerchandise Co. have suc- 
ceeded to the entire stock of jewelry and 
notions of M'. ]M. Gear & Co., Knoxville 
Junction, la. 

Frank E. Jackson, Angola, Ind., has 
purchased a stock of jewelry and notions 
at Hudson, Ind., and will do business there 
for a short time. 

J. & H. Kayser’s store, Parkston, S. D., 
was entered a few days ago and a number 
of watches and jewelry taken, the value 
aggregating $1(K). 

Will Trein, Dixon, 111., returned from 
Chicago last week, where he purchased 
stock for his new jewelry store to be 
opened at Ashton, 111. 

H. L. Jacot, a jeweler at Bethlehem, 
Pa., was stricken with apoplexy Thursday 
night. His condition later improved and 
there seemed to be a chance of his re- 
covery. 

Rovelstad Bros., 161 Chicago St., Elgin, 
111., have purchased for $15,000 a new store 
on the same street, into which they will 


remove their jewelry business, after thor- ; j 
oughly equipping and refitting the new 
premises. 

J. S. Lewis, of J. S. Lewis & Co., Og- 
den, Utah, has received a deed for $8,000, 
gives a mortgage for $5,000 and receives 
another deed for $6,600. 

A fire broke out recently at George 
Haneline’s watch repairing shop, 133 S. ,, 
Main St., Akron, O., in a pile of papers, j j 
But little damage was done. T 

F. D. Lantz has closed his jewelry store 
at Castana, la., and has gone to Sioux 
City. It is understood that another jew- ; ; 
elry store will be located at Castana. - 

The Charles R. Kelsey Co., Ltd., have j 
been incorporated in Mountain Home, ')') 
Idaho, and succeed to the stock of jew- ' \ ; 
elry, etc., of Charles R. Kelsey & Co. L 
The jewelry store of G. S. De Mots, ) 
Hull, la., was recently robbed of goods J 
to the value of $150. The more valuable L i 
portion of the stock was in the safe, which ; 
was not molested. : 

A prisoner released from the county jail, 1 
Moline, 111., has disclosed the fact that j 
Julius Limbach, recently pardoned, told 
him in confidence that he (Limbach) and | | 

his pals were casting about for an easy ! 
way to get into E. Okerberg’s jewelry store ; | 

when arrested. The crooks were then in | j 
the yard in the rear of a restaurant exam- J [ 
ining a window of the jewelry store. Lim- 
bach’s petition for pardon was not favored ( 
by the Moline police. i. 

Frank I. Bailey, jeweler, Aitkin. Minn., \ 
started out recently in a sleigh for a visit :■ 
to the lumber camps. He had just got , i 
across the Mississippi River when the * i 
sleigh overturned and the fall resulted in ; ' 

a dislocated shoulder for Mr. Bailey. He 
turned back to town, had his shoulder put < 
in place and secured some medicine, and 
in less than one hour from the time of the , 
accident he was again on his way toward ' 
the lumber camps. ( 




West Silver Co., = Taunton, Mass., 


MANUFACTURERS OF THE 


F. B. ROGEIRS BRAND 

OF SILVERWARE. 


Heavily plated on extra hard White 
metal. 

JWeW and attractive designs. 

"Bright prices. 

QUICK SHIPMENTS. 

Send for Catalogue. 

New York Office, 80 Chambers Street. 


Boston Office, 67 Chauncy Street. 


.1' I' I' h k' h i' h i' 


I 


February 6, 1901. 


THE JEWELERS’ CIRCULAR-WEEKLY. 


65 





3u Jai-aiavy, our Senior, 
J^r. C.5.>Ufor6,noui tKcJVcs- 
iibcnt" of the ccrjooratloi-;, 
lal5 the Irout'tbation cctlie 
business which fovupWutbs 
ot" thivtij'tu'o vicars has been 
successfully mamtamcb 
iDithout a break or Intcriaip- 
Hou of a sine] I c bay. 0ur 
^ growth has been stcaby but 

.^not pkeixomcual. 0ur 
CV / recorb fct uprl9ht business 
e3TA3u3H€Di868 1 bcallna Is unassai lable. 
j^coRpoHATeb ,69= I: opi-^cn uie suci^esf that you 

• loolctous for SV/\TCMg 5 
^ ci.w.^LfoRo ’y-"' C^€SV^€LR.V, rUc Icu ou' 

I 1 - .r! JDn c c ( lAc UT ^ t" « I I 111 


'■ thatWo offer the bcstxialucs 
possible aub servUcc that 
^caimot be exccUcb. 




c 


J 


STaithfully jyouvs 

e.g/U forb Sr eo. 

i 9 ~ ^ rc a ^ .w,3^Tc ixOf* 


orK 


i; 






» V 

l(: 

rx 




66 


THE JEWELERS’ CIRCULAR-WEEKLY. 


February 6, 1901. 


CHART 

FOR THE 

Grading of Diamonds 


A. Blue white and perfect. 

B. Blue white and imperfect. 

C. Extra white and perfect. 

D. Extra white and slightly imper- 

fect. 

E. Extra white and imperfect. 

1. White and perfect. 

2. White and slightly imperfect. 

3. White and imperfect. 

4. Very good color and perfect. 

6. Very good color and slightly im- 
perfect. 

6. Very good coior and imperfect 

7. Good color and perfect. 

8. Good color and slightly imper- 

fect. 

9. Good color and imperfect. 
Copyrighted Sept., 1900, by S. C. Scott. 


GRADED DIAMONDS. 

There are several differ^- 
ent and distinct grades of 
diamonds of the finer qual- 
ities. These are known 
in the “Rough” to cut= 
tens as Jaegers, Top Crys- 
tals, Crystals, Top Sil- 
vercapes and Silvercapes. 

Each of these grades we 
indicate by letters or num- 
bers. Each diamond we 
sell, whether loose or 
mounted, is marked with 
a number or letter to in= 
dicate the quality, and, 
remember, we guarantee 
them to be exactly as 
represented. 

We believe even those 
who are well posted in 
the different grades 
would find our system of 
much assistance in mak- 
ing sales. Our prices will 
compare favorably with 
any in the market. 

We cater for special 
memorandum sales. 

Please try us once and 
let us show you what we 
can do in quality and price. 

S. C. SCOTT MFC. CO., 

9, II, 13 Maiden Lane, 

NEW YORK. 


C. J. Scott has opened a jewelry and 
notion business on S. Main St., Danville, 
111 . 

George Lawrence has moved his jewelry 
and repair shop from Pittsfield to Quincy, 
111 . 

Wells Bros., dealers in jewelry and boots 
and shoes, Hampton, la., will retire from 
! business. 

T. J. Lanyon, jeweler and notion dealer. 
Little Sioux, la., has given a realty mort- 
gage for $650. 

James W. Jones, Joplin, Mo., has given 
a chattel mortgage on his safe and show 
cases for $234. 

J. R. Bender, Ashland, Miss., is retiring 
from business and selling out his jewelry 
stock at auction. 

W. G. Frederick, Sioux Falls, S. D., has 
bought a cigar store, but will continue his 
jewelry business also. 

Abraham J. Levin, of Abraham J. Levin 
& Co., St. Joseph, Mo., has sold real 
estate valued at $1,200. 

The Dublin Drug and Jewelry Co., 
Dublin, Tex., have sold out their business 
to the W. J. Clay Drug Co. 

J. H. Denman has gone to Chicago, in 
the interest of the McGregor Jewelry and 
Music Co., McGregor, Tex. 

M. C. Cohen, of Cohen Bros., wholesale 
opticians, Toronto, Ont., visited South- 
bridge, Mass., for a few days last week. 

John Pruett, formerly of Rockville, Ind., 
has moved to Terre Haute, Ind., where he 
will probably go into the jewelry business. 

Harry L. Dodge, who recently sold his 
jewelry store at Bryant, S. D., has gone to 
the State of Washington for his health. 

H. K. and K. K. Lee will engage in the 
jewelry business in Fosston, Minn. H. K. 
Lee was formerly engaged in the business 
there. 

The jewelry store of A. E. Kintner, 
Painesville, O., was scorched recently. The 
loss is understood to be covered by insur- 
ance. 

Robert E. Kniesel, of Waterbury, Conn., 
has accepted the position as head watch- 
maker at the Pfeiffer Co.’s store. Cedar 
Falls, la. 

W. H. Nelson, jeweler and optician for 
Patridge & Co., Wellston, O., will open a 
jewelry store on South St., Jackson, O., 
this month. 

John M. Graves purchased the Charles 
Teel stock of jewelry at Norman, Okla., 
a few days ago, and will combine the busi- 
ness with his own. 

A glass skylight in J. C. Freeman & 
Co.’s optical store, near Main and Elm 
Sts., Worcester, Mass., was smashed some 
days 'ago by falling snow. 

Stephen Engle, a Hazleton, Pa., jeweler, 
has invented a telephone transmitter which 
experts say will greatly lessen the cost of 
equipment of telephone plants. 

John H. Tilton, a jeweler of Newbury, 
Vt., and Miss Annie May Gauthier were 
married at the home of the bride in Rye- 
gate, Jan. 8, by Rev. J. L. Merrill. 

Andrew E. Macnen, Milford, R. L, has 
bought the jewelry store occupied by 
George H. Whittemore. Woonsocket, R. 
L, and took possession Feb. 1. 

Dr. E. A. Russell, jeweler and optician, 
formerly of Leesburg, Fla., but now of 
Fitzgerald, Ga., has been in Leesburg for 
a few days, meeting old friends. 


C. J. Nord, formerly with M. A. Hagen, 
Fargo, N. Dak., will take charge of the 
jewelry and watch department in Greene’s 
drug and jewelry store, Dickinson, N. 
Dak. 

H. C. Midlam, Rome, N. Y., has pur- 
chased from the W. L. Lasher Co. their 
stock of optical goods and instruments, 
which he has moved to 110 N. Washington 
St. 

The jewelry store of W. T. Hill, John- 
son City, Tenn., was broken into and 
robbed of several watches and other arti- 
cles, Jan. 22. The front window was 
broken and a showcase shattered. 

M. C. Weyer, jeweler, Faribault, Minn., 
was taken in by an alleged farmer, who had 
a check signed “Farmers’ Elevator Co.” 
for $18.20. The check was forged. It is 
the fourth case of forgery in Faribault 
within a month. 

E. H. Burridge & Co., who have been 
operating jewelry establishments both in 
Humboldt, Tenn., and Paris, Tenn., have 
closed their business houses in both places 
and will soon remove to Salem, 111., where 
they will continue. 

Edward J. Spall, manager of the Ed- 
wards jewelry store, 44 North St., Pitts- 
field, Mass., severed his connection with 
that business Feb. 1. Mr. Spall has for 
the past 14 years been connected with the 
store as manager. 

L. Van Hemelryk, jeweler, Buffalo, N.Y., 
complained to the police last week that a 
sneak thief had entered his establishment 
and walked away with two watches. Al- 
bert Bihl, arrested on suspicion of stealing 
the articles, pleaded not guilty, and his 
case was adjourned. 

An attempt was recently made to rob 
the jewelry store of W. H. Wyman, Col- 
orado Springs, Col., and had it not been for 
an accident many dollar^’ worth of valuable 
goods might have been taken. In remov- 
ing a glass window the thief broke the 
glass and was frightened away by the 
noise. 

About a year ago the Cataract Tool and 
Optical Co., Buffalo, N. Y., received an 
order to mount telescopes upon several 
Mauser sporting rifles. The company have 
since learned that these rifles were shipped 
to South Africa, and are some of the weap- 
ons which have been used so effectively 
by the Boers. 

Word comes from Scotland that Th_mas 
R. Marshall, head of the well known firm 
of William Marshall & Co., jewelers and 
goldsmiths to the Queen, 134 Princess St., 
Edinburgh, died recently, aged 78 years, at 
his residence, 4 E. Castle Road, after a 
protracted illness. Mr. Marshall was iden- 
tified with philanthropic and religious 
work in Edinburgh during the past half 
century. 

F. Z. Sherwood’s jewelry store, Fari- 
bault, Minn., was entered a few days ago 
and several hundred dollars’ worth of 
jewelry appropriated. The store is on the 
main street and is prominently located. 
It seems incredible that it should be en- 
tered and robbed without the thieves being 
detected, especially as a number of bur- 
glaries have occurred lately and have put 
the police force on the alert. 

George W. Fisher, Sharon, Pa., is having 
his store refitted with quarter sawed oak 
wall cases and with all glass patented onyx 


February 6, 1901. 


67 


THE JEWELERS’ CIRCULAR-WEEKLY. 


framed showcases. The work is being 
done by the Cleveland Store Fixture Co., 
Cleveland, O. 

George Mackley is advertising to sell 
out his jewelry business at Sault Ste. 
Marie, Ont. 

A one-story brick building will be erect- 
ed in Morris, 111., for the jewelry store of 
G. C. Ridings. 

The jewelry store of the late C. H. Kol- 
ter. Orange, Tex., was sold recently to 
Joe Lucas, Orange, Tex. 

Jule K. Pickett, Salem, O., will soon 
move his jewelry business to another lo- 
cation in the same town. 

Burglars broke into Fisk & Son’s jew- 
elry store, Rowen, la., Wednesday night 
and got $200 worth of valuables. 

W. J. Hinman, Oneida, N. Y., has 
moved his jewelry business from James 
and Madison Sts. to Main and Phelps Sts. 

A. H. Minkley, formerly of Toledo, O., 
and Grand Rapids, Mich., has taken a 
bench at Bedford’s jewelry store, Ionia. 
Mich. 

John Davis, a jeweler of St. Clairsville, 
O., recently suffered a stroke of paralysis, 
but his condition is now somewhat im- 
proved. 

The disastrous fire at Matawan, N. J., 
early last Sunday morning, destroyed 
among other buildings the jewelry store 
of J. M. Manning. 

J. P. Hale, Akron, O., has just placed an 
order with the Cleveland Store Fixture 
Co., Cleveland, O., for refitting his store 
with mahogany wall cases. 

Charles Buder, Columbus, Miss., was 
recently elected senior warden of Colum- 
bus Lodge No. 5, F. & A. M. He has 
been connected with the Lodge for many 
years. 

The jewelry store of John J. Bleich, Pa- 
ducah, Ky., caught fire last Saturday 
night from an unknown cause. The loss 
is about '$3,000; fully covered by insur- 
ance. Most of the damage was done by 
water. 

The stockholders of the Rochester Op- 
tical and Camera Co., Rochester, N. Y., 
have elected the following directors: PI 

B. Carlton, F. P. Allen, B. E. Chase, E. 
W. Peck, R. K. Dwyer, C. M. Smith, J. 
A. Robertson. 

The jewelry store of W. T. Hill, John- 
son City, Tenn., was broken into recently 
and robbed of several valuable watches. 
The thief broke open a front window and 
then demolished the showcase. No clue 
to the guilty parties has been discovered. 

The stockholders of the Rockford Sil- 
ver Plate Co., Rockford, 111., held their 
annual meeting Thursday. H. W. Price, 
A. D. Forbes and William Lathrop were 
elected directors for three years. Harry 
Allen and F. J. Sovereign were named as. 
auditors. 

The plant of the A. F. Towle & Son 
Co., Greenfield, Mass., has not been sold as 
yet, but negotiations are said to be pend- 
ing from which a favorable outcome is ex- 
pected. It is reported from Springfield, 
Maas., that representatives of R. H. White 
Co. and Jordan, Marsh & Co., of Boston, 
have been negotiating for the stock of the 
A. F. Towle & Son Co.’s silver works. 

A gasoline stove exploded in the jew- 
elry store of Albert E. Post, 1127 N. Sal- 
ina St., Syracuse, N. Y., last week, but the 


HEADQUARTERS 



CROSS & BECUELIN, 

17 MAIDEN LANE, NEW YORK. 





Cbe 

Ceader 

...IN... 

H1QH=QRADE 
WATCHES 

IS THE 

VACHERON & CONSTANTIN, 

GENEVA, SWITZERLAND. 


FIRST in 


Quality, 

Adjustment, 

Durability, 

Style. 


FITS ALL SIZES 
OF AHERICAN 
C/ SES. 


f NEW 

I A ^ ▼ IMPRO 


IMPROVEMENTS. 


EDMOND E. ROBERT, 




TRADB-MARK. 

SPECIAL GRADES 
FOR RAILROAD 
HEN. 


1 


SOLE AGENT, 


3 Maiden Lane, 

New York. 





6S 


February 6, 1901. 


THE JEWELERS’ CIRCULAR-WEEKLY. 


fire was out before the firemen arrived. 
The damage was slight. 

W. G. Frazier has started in the jewelry 
business at Durham, N. C. 

Charles Rogers, an optician of Spring- 
field, Mass., is at Deland, Fla. 

It is reported that a watch case factory 
is negotiating for a site at Quincy, 111. 

C. F. Anderson, a watchmaker of Bur- 
lington, .la., died recently at his residence. 



22— Departments— 22 
Jewelry and kindred lines. 
Have you our1901 Catalogue? 


205 N. Gunnison St. The deceased was 60 
j’ears of age and lived in Burlington for 
over 20 years. 

H. D. Harker, Cuba, Wis., is enlarging 
his store to accommodate his new jewelry 
stock. 

J. B. King, Hawkinsville, Pa., has taken 
more commodious quarters for his jewelry 
business. 

Harry Davis, Topeka, Kan., is selling 
out at auction, preparatory to retiring 
from business. 

Woodard & Group, jewelers, formerly 
of 325J E. Trade St., Charlotte, N. C., 
have moved to 217 W. Trade St. 

John Van Eps will give up his jewelry 
l)usiness at Plainfield, N. J., about April 1, 
and engage in business at Somerville, N. J. 

W. T. Newton and Goetz & Yaffe, jewel- 
ers of Knoxville, Tenn., will both remove 
their businesses to other stores in the same 
city. 

W. H. Bradshaw, Wooster, O., early in 
the Spring will move hij family to Paris, 
111., where he will engage in the jewelry 
business. 

Martin F. Thompson has closed his jew- 
elry shop in Dennis Port, Mass., and gone 
to Lynn, where he has gone into another 
business. 

Jeweler William Bichman, Pomeroy, O., 
was recently married, at Point Pleasant, 
W. Va., to Miss Anna Margaret Mees, ot 
Mason, O. 


■k 

-k 

-k 

-k 

-k 

-k 

-k 

■k 


JULES JURQENSEN, 

Plain and Complicated 

Watches and Chronometers 

HAVE RECEIVED THE 

HIGHEST “POSSIBLE” AWARD, 

Paris-“The Grand Prix ’’-1900 I 

Sole Agents, SCHILZ & RIDOLPH, 

28 John Street and 65 ^assau Street, new YORK. 


An attempt was made last week to rob 
the jewelry store of Henry Ulrich, Main 
St., Sharpsburg, Pa. The burglar was 
scared away by a policeman and escaped. 

The annual report of the Niagara Silver 
Co., filed at Lockport, N. Y., last week, 
shows: Capital (actually issued), $600,000; 
debts do not exceed $300,000; assets, at 
least one dollar. 

J. T. Montgomery has bought an in- 
terest in the jewelry business of R. H. 
Rickcrt, Statesville, N. C., and the busi- 
ness will be conducted under the firm 
name of Rickert & Montgomery. 

The friends of the late John Wiesen, 
who was recently drowned in the Niagara 
River, and especially those employed at 
the Carter-Crume and the Niagara Silver 
Co.,’s plants, Niagara Falls, are arranging 
for an entertainment to be given Feb. 19, 
for the benefit of the widow. 

An expert recently worked 11 hours 
trying to open the safe in Jules Wen- 
dell & Son's jewelry store, Oswego, N. Y. 
The combination refused to work and it 
was found necessary to telegraph to 
the safe company. The expert, by drilling 
a hole in one of the doors, succeeded in 
opening the safe. 

Burglars at New Orleans, La., last week 
robbed Charles F. Pitcher, a jeweler, at 
925 Canal St., of over $150 worth of cheap 
jewelry. Among the articles taken were 
six dozen plated rings, 11 pairs of cuff 
buttons, two dozen scarf pins, two dozen 
earrings and four dozen watch chains, be- 
sides other articles. 

Harry Myers, known as “Diamond 
Harry,” who was brought to Troy from 
Albany, N. Y., last week by Detective Man- 
ning, was arraigned in the Police Court on 
a charge of swindling Jacob Elkan and 
Louis Tigar, two pawnbrokers, by selling 
them “fake” diamonds. Myers was in jail 
in Albany on a similar charge, but com- 
promised there and was released. 

Jeweler Snyder, Tecumseh, Okla., had a 
confidence game played on him recently, 
which entailed the loss of a valuable time- 
piece. While he was in the post office 
Register Hunter handed him his gold 
watch asking him to fix it at once. An 
hour later a well dressed stranger called 
at Snyder’s place and asked, “if that gold 
watch was fixed yet.” Snyder supposed 
Hunter had sent him and handed out Hun- 
ter’s watch, which he took and paid $1 
for the repairs. A few minutes later Hun- 


I 





RAILWAY KING. 

i8 Si*e. 

25 Raby Jewels. 




COLUMBUS WATCHES 

...ARE... 

STRICTLY HIGH GRADE. 

...YOU CAN... 

MAKE MORE MONEY handling our 
watches than with any other make. 


I 

? 

? 

Y 

Y 
❖ 

t 

Y 

X 


The Columbus 
Watch Co., 

COLUMBUS. OHIO. 


r Send for Y 
New *;■ 

Prlce-Wst X. 
and A 

Special 
Discounts. 


THE LATEST 
American 
Movement 

ON THE MARKET. 

$5. 

Every One Guaranteed. 

Naught Size, Hunting. 

7 Jewel, Nickeled Damaskeened, Cut Expan- 
sion Balance. Straight Line Lever Escapement, 
Visible Pallets, Hardened and Polished Pinions, 
Hard Enamel Dial, Stem Wind and Set. 

SUFFOLK WATCH CO., 

37 & 39 Maiden Lane, New York City. 






February 6, 1901. 


THE JEWELERS’ CIRCULAR-WEEKLY. 


69 


ter himself called for the watch, and though 
the police were called and the town thor- 
oughly searched, no trace of the stranger 
was to be found. 

T. R. Helms, Waxhaw, N. C., has 
opened a jewelry store at Monroe, N. C. 

E. S. Williams is now watchmaker for 
Patridge & Co., Wellston, O. 

B. L. Cooper, formerly of Colorado, 
Tex., has engaged in business at Snyder, 
Tex. 

A. Rosebrough is remodeling and en- 
larging his jewelry store at Georgetown, 
Tex. 

W. F. Bell, late of South Town, Ala., 
has opened a jewelry store at New De- 
catur, Ala. 

A. M. Felson, Gouverneur, N. Y., is re- 
modeling, enlarging and renovating his 
jewelry store. 

Thomas H. McNary, Washington, Pa., 
last week returned from a business trip 
to New York. 

Edmund H. Abbott has secured new 
quarters in Owatonna, Minn., for his jew- 
elry business and moved Feb. 1. 

Hathaway Bros., Elizabeth City, N. C., 
have now established their jewelry store 
in the Overman building, that city. 

The Cooperative Mercantile Co., with 
a capital of $500,000, to deal in diamonds, 
were formed in New Jersey, last week. 

The jewelers of Freeport, III, have all 
signed an agreement to close their stores 
at 6 p. M., except Saturday evenings, until 
December. 

N. G. Carr, the veteran jeweler of Con- 
cord, N. H., who has been confined to 
the house the greater part of the Winter 
by illness, is now almost entirely well 
again. 

The jewelry store of G. S. De Mots, 
Hull, la., was entered by burglars Jan. 
27 and goods taken to the extent of $160. 
The most valuable portion of the stock 
was not molested. 

Conrad Eifert, Jasper, Ind., died last 
week, aged 76. He was highly respected 
and was a pioneer watchmaker of his 
town. He served many years as a Justice 
of the Peace. 


A fire occurred Jan. 29 in the jewelry 
store of V. L. Hunt, Rockland, Me., but 
was put out quickly, before doing much 
damage. It was caused by the igniting 
of benzine, with which Mr. Hunt was 
cleaning a clock. 

The case of Kid Dooley and Mat Car- 
ter, the two negroes charged at Council 
Bluffs, la., with stealing a gold watch and 
a gold ring from jewelry stores, was up 
last week. A change of venue was taken 
to Justice Perrier’s Court, where the case 
was tried Wednesday. 

The Aldine Mfg. Co., Grand Rapids, 
Mich., manufacturers of clock and mantel 
work, filed a trust mortgage recently, cov- 
ering debts to the amount of about $20,- 
000. Arthur C. Torrey is made trustee 
and the Fourth National bank, as the 
heaviest creditor, is the holder of the doc- 
ument. 

A new wholesale jewelry firm, under 
the style of Bushway, Britt & Co., have 
been formed at Decatur, 111. According 
to the articles of agreement filed in that 
city, the parties are F. H. Bushway, Lov- 
ington; J. C. F. Harrington, Iowa City, 
la., and W. E. Britt, Americus, Ga. The 
partnership is for three years and the cap- 
ital is to be $9,000, each of the three per- 
sons mentioned to own $3,000 worth of 
stock. Mr. Bushway is named as presi- 
dent, Mr. Britt as vice-president and Mr. 
Harrington as secretary and treasurer. 

Fred. H. Rees severed his connection 
with the W. H. Frost jewelry store, El- 
mira, N. Y., Feb. 1, where he had been 
engaged for years. In the future Mr. Rees 
will be found in the Steel Memorial build- 
ing, corner of Lake and Market Sts., 
where he will conduct the Rees School of 
Engraving, and engage in the sale of dia- 
monds and fine watches. In the past 12 
years he has had charge of the engraving 
and watch work, as well as superintfended 
the sales of the Frost jewelry store. For 
some time past Mr. Rees has conducted 
the Elmira School of Engraving, giving 
instruction to a number of pupils from all 
over the country. The school of engrav- 
ing will, in the future, be known as the 
Rees School of Engraving. 


Always Reliable. 

All the essential features of higher- 
priced movements — lever escapements, 
screw bankings and tempered hair- 
springs— make 

Trenton Watches 


the best timekeepers for the price on 
the market. 



No. 10. — 12-size, seven jewels, lever setting, 
hunting (open face without second hand), nickel 
damaskeened, compensation balance, safety 
pinion, solid plates, separate barrel bridge, quick 
train, straight-line lever escapement, screw bank- 
ings, handsome white enamel diah 


SEND FOR PRICE-LIST. 


The Trenton Watch Co., 

TRENTON, N. J. 


IGNATZ MANN, 

45 Jolin Street, - NEW YORK, 
MANUFACTURER OF THE 

Best Hand-Made 

Diamond Mountings. 

LOWEST PRICES. 


DON’T FORGET THE JEWELERS’ CIRCULAR PUB> 
lISHING OO.’S book list when In want of any tech 
nical work In the Jewelry or Kindred Trades. 


♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦ 
^ X 


OMEGA WATCHES. 

Always good sellers and profitable. Prices not advertised in any journal. 

DO YOU SELL THE OMEGA? 

The Omegas are made in 6 different grades; from 7 to 21 jewels, adjusted; in 
10 and 11 ligne; 0, 12 and 16 sizes; fitting American cases; 
also steel cases and fancy cases for these movements. 

SEND FOR PRICE-LIST. 


: 

♦ 

♦ 

♦ 

♦ 

♦ 

I 

♦ 

♦ 


EDMOND E. ROBERT, \ selling j CROSS & BE6UELIN, I 

3 Maiden Lane. f agents. | Maiden Lane. I 



VOL. XLII. NEW YORK, WEDNESDAY, FEBRUARY 6, 1901. No. 1. 


Chicago Notes. 

All communications in reference to the Chi- 
cago department of The Jezvclers’ Circnlar- 
Weekly, addressed to Stephen Parlin, 134 
Van Biiren St.. Room 414, Chicago, will 
receive prompt attention. 


TRADE CONDITIONS. 

Business is about as usual for the season, with noth 
ing large doing, but there is a good steady general 
demand. The west is stocked up a little better than 
for the corresponding time last year, and though 
the holiday trade was good among the retailers, 
yet their larger purchases of the Fall and Winter 
left them with fair stocks on hand. This neces- 
sarily restricts' trading somewhat for the momen* 
and no great things are expected for February. 
March, however, should show an improvemen:. 
The Spring business is expected to be fully up 
to normal, and the general indications point to a 
large business for the year as a whole. The entire 
country is prosperous and there seems no possi- 
bility of anything in the way of adverse legislation 
that can seriously affect trade. The east and the 
south, judging from the bank clearances, are in a 
little better position than the central west. The 
south, with its high priced cotton, larger crops of 
rice and increasing manufactories, is in splendid 
shape and will stand a careful looking after. The 
same is particularly true of Texas. Traveling men 
who have returned from States west of Chicago 
report excellent business in all sections, though it 
would be even larger but for the number of fair 
sized stocks met with. The entire absence of fail- 
ures of any consequence in the jewelry trade speaks 
well lor the healthy condition of the business. 


Spaulding & Co. completed inventory Iasi 
week. 

Frank Sproehnle has returned from his 
eastern visit. 

M. A. Lumbard, Des Moines, la., was 
here for a day last week. 

John C. Dueber was a visitor here the 
latter part of the week. 

L. A. Hoard, Waupun, Wis., was last 
week in town as a buyer, visiting jewelry 
and silver houses. 

Frank P. Allen, manager for Boyd Park. 
Denver, Col., was a caller on busines- 
houses here, last week. 

M. Loeb, Chicago manager for the 
Wadsworth Watch Case Co., is putting in 
a few days at New York this week. 

.Mr. Zuckerbrod, of L. Seligman & Co., 
who has been visiting socially at Baltimore 
and other eastern cities, is again in Chi- 
cago. j 

J. W. Tice, manager for Adolphe | 
Schwob, has moved the Chicago offices j 
from room 301 to suite 417-118 Silver- I 
smiths’ building. 

Chicago is not one, two, three with 
Rocky Mount, N. C., when it comes to de- 
partment stores. recent letter from 

that town bore the printed heading, “Office 
of Mann & Hilliard, Practical Silversmiths 


and Custom Shoe Makers, Makers and Re- 
tailers in Cakes, Candies, Pies, Etc.” 

S. Glickauf has been confined to his 
home the last two weeks with bronchitis. 
He has so far recovered as to be about the 
house, but is not yet able to report for 
duty. 

George C. Edwards, vice-president of the 
International Silver Co., and Mrs. Ed- 
wards have returned from Albert Lea, 
Minn., passing through the city direct for 
New Y ork. 

W. J. Miller, western manager for the 
Seth Thomas Clock Co., was able last week 
to resume his trip to central western cities, 
making calls at St. Louis, Louisville and 
Cincinnati and returning here Saturday. 

C. E. Powers, Oregon, 111., was here 
several days last week, but not particularly 
on a buying trip, though he selected a few 
necessities. He was a regular attendant at 
the Carriage Exposition at the Coliseum, 

B. Lederer, S. & B. Lederer Co., was 
in Chicago a couple of days on his way to 
California, with L. Tannenbaum, New 
York, to look after mining interests. They 
expect to remain in the far west a month. 

W. J. Buckley, the tower clock man of 
the Seth Thomas Clock Co., has his hands 
full this season. His present trip includes 
the erection of a clock at Jefferson City, 
Mo., one at Provost, Utah, and one at 
Rock Island, 111. 

A large shipment from the United States 
assay office, at New York, was received 
by Goldsmith Bros., Saturday. It consist- 
ed of sweepings and lead, gold and silver 
bullion, and was switched direct to the 
smelter at Throop and 58th Sts. 

The stock of the Bates & Bacon Chicago 
office has been transferred to the sales- 
rooms of the Philadelphia Watch Case Co., 
eighth floor of the Silversmiths’ building. 
H. S. Noyes, who represented Bates & 
Bacon here, has returned east. 

Schrader-Wittstein Co. will move Feb. 7 
from the Reliance building to quarters that 
have been handsomely fitted up for their 
occupancy on the fifth floor of the Colum- 
bus Memorial building. The factory of the 
company is at 48-50 Wabash .\vc. 

A novelty in commercial life was intro- 
duced by G. A. Soden at his salesrooms 
last week, it being a lecture by Mrs. Ur- 
sula R. Gestefeld, of the church of “The 
Science of Being,” to the employes of the 
firm. Her subject was the practical use of 
thought force. Mr. Soden wished his em- 
ployes to enjoy the benefits of her teach- 
ings and if they are interested he is will- 
ing to devote one and one-half hours one 
morning each week for that purpose. Mrs. 


Gestefeld was listened to with close atten- 
tion and Mr. Soden feels the experiment 
will prove a success. 

Mr. Sisson, for a number of years mana- 
ger of the jewelry department of a well 
known Chicago house, has succeeded Mr. 
Talman as head of the department. Mr. 
Sisson has many friends among the eastern 
travelers. 

J. A. Humphries, Ensley, Ala., who filed 
a voluntary petition in bankruptcy, had 
a first meeting of creditors in the office 
of M. W. Trimble, Birmingham, Ala., 
Feb. 4, the details of which have not 
been announced. The liabilities at Chicago 
will be small. 

One of the busy spots in town is the 
jewelry case and tray factory of the Illinois 
Case Co., G3-'65 Washington St. President 
Spaulding, of the company, states that 
with the exception of the third week in 
January the factory has been rushed since 
the holidays. Their specialty of all kinds 
of repair work is a rapidly growing branch 
of their business. 

John Cooper, 14 years old, was a 
prisoner at the Central police station, 
a few days ago. Klein Bros., 1501 Cham- 
plain building, are mourning the loss of 
jewelry valued at $250 intrusted in his care. 
The jewelry was given to Cooper to deliver 
to customers, but, according to the pris- 
oner, was stolen from him by a negro. The 
police are inclined to believe his story as 
to the theft of the jewelry. 


John M. Bredt Wants $10,000 as Balm 
for His Injured Character. 

Chicago, 111., Jan. 29. — A suit for $10,- 
000 dama’ges has been filed in the Circuit 
Court by John M. Bredt, a diamond 
broker, 57 Washington St., against Mrs. 
Hattie M. Hegberg, 1457 Newport Ave., 
charging her with criminal libel. Two and 
a half years ago Bredt appraised a dia- 
mond necklace for Mrs. Hegberg. Last 
month she had him arrested, charging that 
he had overvalued the necklace which was 
appraised by him several years before, and 
that on account of such appraisal she lost 
money in a sale for less than $500, the ap- 
praisal value and price she paid for it. 
When Bredt was brought into Court, Dec. 
22, he was discharged and the prosecution 
rebuked for bringing the defendant into 
Court. He said yesterday: 

“The report of the trial in the Court ha.' 
injured my reputation and business,- hence 
the suit. I have been engaged in business 
in Chicago too long to have my reputation 
assailed on such ridiculous charges.” 




February 6, 1901. THE JEWELERS’ CIRCULAR— WEEKLY. — Western Supplement. 


71 


Department Pointers. 


DIAMONDS. 

Our stock is large, its assort= 
ment as to quality and price 
complete, and as these are the 
essential qualifications of a stock 
to buy from advantageously, we 
think it would pay you to patron= 
ize this department Turn to 
pages 98 to 112, our 1901 Cata= 
logue; if nothing there suits you, 
let us know your wants — we 
can undoubtedly satisfy them.^/ If 
you haven’t our 1901 Catalogue, 
oblige us by applying for it. 


WATCHE.S. 

The fact that throughout the 
entire Holiday period last year 
we took care of our customers 
in this line adds foundation to 
our claim of having distinctly 
the best equipped and most 
reliable Watch Department in the 
country O It would indeed be a 
hard matter to find a better col= 
lection of gold and other cases 
of the latest designs, the best 
makes and the best prices 0 This 
department is listed pages 3 to 96, 
our 1901 Catalogue. 


JEWELRY. 

In this line as well as others 
we have made a careful study of 
what the trade demands 0 Taken 
together with our extensive ex= 
perience we are thus enabled to 
forecast styles and patterns with 
some degree of certainty and act 
accordingly 0 You can therefore 
feel safe buying jewelry from us 
in that it is reliable, that the 
stock to select from is complete 
in assortment and style, and that 
it is bought in such quantities as 
to save you mPney^e/See pages 98 
to 356, our 1901 Catalogue. 


MATERIAL. 

Without question we have the 
most complete Material Depart= 
ment in the United States 0 Re= 
liable work cannot be done with= 
out reliable tools and material to 
work with 0 What we have are 
the best in every particular We 
also have a force of thoroughly 
experienced clerks to fill your 
orders, which is an additional ad= 
vantage.^^ For this department we 
publish a special catalogue con= 
taining about 650 pages 0 Every= 
thing fully illustrated and de= 
scribed and which we will for= 
ward on application if you haven’t 
one. 


BENJ. ALLEN 6 CO., 

wholesale jewelers, 

131=137 Wabash Ave., 


CHICAGO 





THE JEWELERS’ CIRCULAR— WEEKLY. — Western Supplement. 


February 6, 1901. 


Pearls. Sapphires. 

All kinds of Jobbing Stones. 
LAPIDARY WORK. 

HERMANN & CO., 

IMPORTERS OF 

Precious p;:^^ Imitation Stones, 

CHIC AGO. 

Op als. Doublets. 



1 F.C. KLEIN. EMIL KLEIN. 


I F.G. KLEIN &BR0., 

T 126 State St., Chicago. | 

I Steam 

1 Lapidary. 

I DIAMOND CITTING. 

1 I 

• IMPORTERS OF | 

j Precious and Jobbing Stones, j 

? • 

CONSTANT VAN REETH, 

Formerly Foreman of The H. Keck Mfg. Co.^b 
C utting Works. 

Importer and Cutter 

of Rough Diamonds 

FOR THE TRADE. 

RECUTTINQ, REPAIRING AND MATCHING 

A SPECIALTY. 

Office and Factory: Rooms 5 & 6 Lion Bldg., 
Corner Fifth and Elm Sts., CINCINNATI, O. 

H. H. Spaulding, Pres. Fred. Whittiger, Treas. 

ILLINOIS CASE CO. 

(incorporated), 
MANUFACTURERS OF 

CASES FOR JEWELRY AND SILVERWARE, 
CHESTS, ROLLS, BAGS, TRAYS, ETC. 

Forms for 'Window Displays 
a Specialty. 

SEND US YOUR SHOW- CASE TRAYS FOR REPAIRS. 

63-G.5 East Washingrton Street, 
Telephone, Central 3035. CHICAGO. 


Minneapolis and St. Paul. 

Clifford Brush, Ortonville, Minn., is a 
new empioye of Fiske & Co., Minneapoiis. 

Efran & ^Masser, 189 E. 3d St., St. Paui, 
have dissoived partnership. Mr. Masser 
succeeds to the business. 

It is quite generaiiy known about town 
that the Jacobs Jewelry Co., Minneapolis, 
are soon to be located in a handsome new 
store further up Nicollet Ave. 

Ingram Bros., Menomonie, Wis. ; E. L. 
Overjorde, Northwood, la., and L. J. 
Kabarle, Elloworth, Wis., were buyers 
from Twin City wholesalers the past week. 

J. H. Mosher, 311 Nicollet Ave., Minnea- 
polis, has closed up his store and placed 
his affairs in the hands of his attorney, 
A. AI. Higgins, 715 New York Life build- 
ing. Mr. Alosher finds himself in financial 
straits and unable to meet his bills. He 
will, therefore, go through bankruptcy. 
The schedule of liabilities and assets is not 
completed. 


Detroit. 

TRADE CONDITIONS. 

The jewelers of Detroit enjoyed the banner trade 
in the history of the craft here during December, 
and this was followed by a dull period of two 
weeks in January. But the last two weeks have 
witnessed a revival. There is a steady and satis- 
factory demand for staples, especially silver ware 
and watches. 


J. C. E. Hanford, bookkeeper for the 
D. B. Bancroft Jewelry Co., Griswold St., 
died very suddenly last week from pneu- 
monia, arising from an attack of grip. 

C. E. DePiiy, whose store at Stock- 
bridge was robbed of $600 in watch move- 
ments and cash, was insured in the Fidelity 
& Casualty Co., and a reward of $300 has 
been offered for the arrest and conviction 
of the thieves. 

The wholesale jewelry establishment of 
Kunz & Shuttleworth narrowly escaped 
serious damage from fire last week. E. E. 
Stockton, of the E. Ingraham Co., dropped 
in for a clock order, and Air. Kunz went 
upstairs to ascertain the condition of the 
stock. Probably five minutes before that 
sparks had dropped out of a chimney hole 
and a lively blaze had been started in one 
corner. In 10 minutes it would have 
been beyond control. As it was, the loss 
was trifling. 


Columbus, 0. 

W. S. Tussig has made many improve- 
ments in his store on W. Gay St., and now 
has a very attractive place. The fixtures 
are all new and the stock of goods make 
a handsome appearance. 

Perry M. Ford has made a satisfactory 
settlement with his creditors and will con- 
tinue his jewelry business corner of High 
and Town Sts. It seems that his inability 
to meet bills at once came about through 
the fact that he had to satisfy another obli- 
gation upon which he had secured a prom- 


ise of the necessary time to realize upon 
other investment, but which changed 
hands and was pushed at once. 

The director of law of this city has re- 
fused to accept the substitute for the ori- 
ginal pawnbrokers’ license ordinance, as 
prepared by an attorney representing 
them. The license, as the ordinance will 
go to the City Council, will be $200 per 
year,. The substitute would have made it 
$ 100 . 

A peculiar case developed some days 
ago at Newark, near here, when Charles 
H. Blume, a Marietta jeweler, appeared and 
claimed a diamond ring in possession of 
Haynes Bros. It appears that a penny- 
weighter had taken the ring from Air. 
Blume’s store, and when he reached Newark 
he worked the same racket at the Haynes 
store, leaving the Blume ring in place of 
one more valuable that he took in the 
same way. He has never been heard of, 
but Air. Blume claimed that the ring 
which Haynes Bros, had traded for much 
against their wishes belongs to him. 


Indianapolis. 

Charles W. Lauer & Co. have presented 
their friends and customers with good, 
serviceable desk rulers, containing the 
firm’s name and address. 

The American National Bank of India- 
napolis opens for business Feb. 4. The 
list of stockholders includes the names of 
a number of well known business men, 
among them Carl F. Walk. 

Last week Julius C. Walk & Son dis- 
played a large and handsome line of steins. 
An unusual demand for these goods was 
created by the “Stein Dinner,” given at 
the Columbia Club, Feb. 2. Each mem- 
ber furnished his own stein, which is to 
become the property of the club and used 
in decorating. About 1,000 were expected 
at the dinner. All the engravers in the 
city were kept busy marking steins. 

Among the buyers in the city last week 
were: J. D. Taylor, Logansport, Ind.; E. O. 
Collins, Franklin, Ind.; J. Rothinghouse, 
Gas City. Ind.; J. Booth, Tipton, Ind.; Will 
Reed, son of J. H. Reed, Paris, 111.; L. C. 
Phillips, Carbon, Ind.; J. W. Hudson, 
Fortville, Ind.; F. Dennis, Westfield, Ind.; 
J. H. Arnold, Columbus, Ind.; E. Shipley, 
Greencastle. Ind.; C. M. Jenkins, Rich- 
mond. Ind.; G. AI. Bartmess, Clinton, Ind.; 
O. AI. Ridgeway, Sheridan, Ind. 


Omaha. 

TRADE CONDITIONS. 

Wholesale dealers purchased larger stocks dur- 
ing January than they have been in the habit of 
purchasing for a number of years. The prosperity 
which came two years ago is increasing and all 
expect to do a big business during 1901. There 
are still a number of good openings throughout 
this territory for watchmakers, and anyone with 
small capital wishing to establish himself in the 
jewelry business will find opportunities. 

E. Welch, Wayne,' Neb., was in the city 


SEYMOUR W. FROLICHSTEIN. FRED. H. ENGLAND 

FROLICHSTEIN & ENGLAND, 

DIAMONDS, RINGS AND JEWELRY. PRESCOTT BUILDING, 65 NASSAU STREET, NEW YORK. 

NEW FIRM— r-NEW GOODS NEW IDEAS. 



February 6, 1901. 


THK JEWELERS’ CIRCULAR— WEEKLY. — Western Supplement. 


73 


last week on his way home from a vacation 
east. 

L. E. Burris, Elliott, la., was a buyer in 
Omaha last week. 

A. D. Smith, Cedar Rapids, Neb., was a 
purchaser last week. 

C. S. Peterson, Oakland, will add a jew- 
elry line to his store. 

William L. Bauer, Manilla, la., is closing 
out his jewelry department. 

W. D. Abel, Petersburg, Neb., visited 
the wholesale trade recently. 

Paul Albright, David City, Neb., and 
John B. Ash, Rockford, 111., are attending 
the horological school here. 

S. Pearson, Oakland, Neb., has enjoyed 
such a good business the past year that he 
is greatly increasing his stock. 

Jacob L. Jacobson is in Washington, hav- 
ing gone to the Capitol City as one of the 
Presidential electors from Nebraska. 

Gertrude Finley was arrested last week 
charged with stealing jewelry from her 
employer, S. A. Goldstein. The property 
was found in her trunk. 


Cleveland, 0. 

iHenry Welf, who has been quite ill with 
grip, is much improved. 

The stock of R. Winzenried, purchased 
a year ago by F. H. Kramer, is being sold 
at auction by Mr. Kramer at 59 Euclid Ave. 

F. Schroecjer, who has been with the 
Griffith instalment house, has been engaged 
as watchmaker by F. H. Kramer. 

Vandals have been scratching many of 
the fine plate glass windows in this cit}^ 
They evidently use a diamond ring to cut 


the glass. In most cases the work con- 
sists of irregular lines and crosses. On the 
big window of the Cowell & Hubbard Co. 
someone has scratched the word “Gussie.” 
This work not only badly mars the glass, 
but greatly weakens it and renders it liable 
to break. 

Webb C. Ball has returned to Cleve- 
land from St. Louis, Mo., whither he 
had gone as one of eight representa- 
tives of the Cleveland Chamber of 
Commerce, to secure the selection of 
Cleveland for the National Encampment 
of the Grand Army of the Republic, to be 
held next September. The committee were 
successful in their efforts, and as the result 
is is expected that Cleveland will be visited 
by about 260,000 veterans in September. 


Denver. 

H. J. Taylor, this city, has gone to Trini- 
dad to open a repair shop. 

Henry Curtis, Littleton, and H. Rach- 
ofsky, Central City, were in Denver last 
week on business. 

Nathan Cohn, Leadville, has retired from 
business and is now in Denver where he 
will make his future home. 

The Lewis Jewelers’ Supply Co., early 
in January, moved from the People’s Bank 
block to much larger quarters in the Ara- 
pahoe building. 

Col. J. D. Lewis, jewelry auctioneer, is 
in Leadville conducting an auction for the 
Roth Jewelry Co. There is a Leadville 
ordinance prohibiting such sales. 

The Western Jewelry Co., Cripple Creek, 
some time ago gave a chattel mortgage. 


Last week the company were sold out un- 
der an order of the Court. Toney Lubel- 
ski bought the stock. The goods were in- 
voiced at $3,400, but brought a much lower 
figure. The liabilities were $5,500. 


Pacific Coast Notes. 

William Robinson, formerly a jeweler of 
Virginia, Nev., and Miss Ida Beck, of that 
city, were married recently. 

An ordinance has been adopted by the 
Board of Supervisors of Calaveras county. 
Cal., raising the license on jewelry ped- 
dlers. 

D. A, Woodward, Hanford, Cal., has sold 
a half interest in his jewelry business to 
N. I. Wheelock, of Los Angeles, Cal. The 
business will be carried on in future under 
the name of Woodward & Wheelock. 

The Board of Supervisors of San Joa- 
quin county. Cal., are advertising for sealed 
bids for keeping in good order and repair 
for the year ending Dec. 1, 1901, all the 
clocks in the County Court House and the 
main Court House clock at Stockton, Cal. 

The business men of San Jose, Cal., are 
making preparations for the entertainment 
to be given in honor of President 
McKinley’s visit to that city next May. J. 
Kocher, H. Morton, W. Ryder and L. 
Machefert, jewelers, of San Jose, have been 
appointed a committee to secure funds to 
carry on the project. 

A. M. Masury, alias James Mitchell, 
alias Charles Wilson, has been ar- 
rested in Sacramento, Cal., on sus- 
picion of having stolen jewelry in San 
Francisco. A circular received from the 


*i»^ wjs# yjs* vjs* viv# jp* Jp* ^p* ^p* vJV vp* vP* wP* wP* 

Ready With Our Spring Line. 




I 






We are showing the best assortment of 
Popular Price Novelties in the Country. 

Our “Lady Hope” 
Adjustable Bracelet 


is a winner. We make it in all styles, 
in sterling silver and gold filled. 


CAN’T WE SEND 
YOU SAMPLES? 




[^imperT^B 


IMPERIAL MFG. CO., 

Masonic Temple, CHICAGO. 




74 


the JEWELERS’ CIRCULAR— WEEKLY. — Western Supplement. 


February 6, 1901. 


ILLINOIS WATCH CASE CO 


100 . 


101 . 

20th Century 

Art Designs on 

COMMANDER 

25=Year 

Gold-Filled Cases 

surpass all previous 
efforts in watch case 
engraving. 


A Modern Jeweler’s Stock 
Is Not Complete With- 
out Them. 


ILLINOIS WATCH CASE CO. 

Factory and Haln Office, 

ELGIN, ILL. 

Chicago. No. 133 Wabash Ave 

New York, No 9 Haiden Lane, Qill Bldg. 

San Francisco, No. 66 Crocker Bldg. 


police department of the latter city de- 
scribed the jewelry taken, and some hours 
later the detectives found Mitchell offering 
rare bargains in jewelry to a bartender. 
When arrested jewels valued at .$550 were 
found in his clo'hing. Masury recently 
came to this coast from Boston. 


San Francisco. 

City retailers report a fairly good trade 
for January. 

George Greenzweig, with his wife and 
son, is on a visit to New York. 

E. W. Wright, Bakersfield, Cal., called 
on the trade of San Francisco last week. 

Fritz .\bendroth, Portland, Ore., is en- 
joying a 10 days’ vacation among his 
friends here, 

Ray Friedherger, of Maurice Friedber- 
ger & Co., Stockton, Cal., spent a day or 
two in this city recently. 

Robert Radke, father of R. L. and G. H. 
Radke, of Radke & Co., died recently of 
apoplexy. The deceased was 75 years of 
age. 

William Hyde, lately with A. I. Hall & 
Son, was last week placed in charge of the 
branch of Joseph Fahys & Co., New York, 
at 120 Sutter St., this city. 

George A. Brown, with A, I. Hall & 
Son, has started on a northern trip, which 
will be of several months’ duration. L. H. 
Smith will visit the southern territory in 
the interest of this firm. 


St. Louis. 

BUSINESS CONDITIONS. 

The jewelers here all report business quiet but 
much better than it was at this time last year. 
The early part of January was quite dull, but 
business improved toward the latter part of the 
month, which brought their January business 
ahead. Quietness in trade is expected for some 
time to come, or until Spring trade opens up. The 
prospects are quite good for a nice business. 


Morris Bauman, of the L. Bauman Jew- 
elry Co., is in New York on business. 

Mr. Cutter, general manager of the Elgin 
National Watch Co., was in the city last 
week. 

All the retail jewelers on the west end 
of Franklin Ave. have decided to close at 
6.30 o’clock Wednesday and Friday even- 
ings. 

The annual election of the Missouri Re- 

S. C. CITROEN & CO.. 

Diamond Cutters and Polishers for the Trade. 

special attention given to repairing stones. 
Cutting of Rough Diamonds at 

415 to 419 Race St.. CIHCINNATI. OHIO. 


tail Jewelers’ Association will take place 
at the rooms of the Association, 507 Frank- 
lin Ave., on the afternoon of Feb. 13. 

Among prominent jeweler^ of nearby 
towns in the city the past week were: 
Fred, Simon, of Collinsville, 111.; C. H. 
Gesecke, Trenton, 111.; Walter Sperling, 
Seneca, Kan.; George Daniels, Kearney, 
Neb., and C. S. Poole, Joplin, Mo. 

T. S. Byers announces that he has sold 
his stock and resigned his position as sec- 
retary in the corporation of the Langsdorf- 
Byers Jewelry Co., and has formed a new 
company under the firm style of T. S. 
Byers Jewelry Co., under his personal con- 
trol. 

The S. A. Rider Jewelry Co. were a small 
loser in the failure of E. Clarke, proprietor 
of the Magnet department store, Spo- 
kane, Wash., one of the largest general 
stores in the city, that filed papers in bank- 
ruptcy in the United States Court, declar- 
ing liabilities of $27,000 with assets amount- 
ing to $19,000. The store and stock are 
now in charge of the United States Mar- 
shal. , 

Arrangements are now all complete for 
the Missouri Retail Jewelers’ Association 
banquet, which will take place on the even- 
ing of Feb. 14. The banqueting place has 
been changed from the Broadway Cafe to 
Schrap’s Cafe, 921 Olive St. It will be a 
stag affair and a number of prominent 
speakers have been invited lOutside of the 
Association. Among them will be several 
prominent in the World’s Fair project, who 
will talk on that matter. 

Fred. Heisler, driver of a United States 
mail wagon, was arrested Feb. I, charged 
with extracting jewelry packages from the 
mails. Heisler denied the charges but 
made evasive answers when closely ques- 
tioned. Nothing was found on him hut a 
gold chain. A gold pen and staff were 
found in the possession of a woman friend. 
She said she had received them, as well as 
a gentleman’s gold ring, with the gem 
missing, from him, but that she had taken 
them to the Barr Jewelry Co. and ex- 
changed them for a brooch. While he ad- 
mitted making the presents to the woman 
he denied taking them from the mails. 
From the Eisenstadt Jewelry Co. it was 
learned that the ring which Heisler had, 
had been brought to them from a pawn- 
shop nearly two weeks before Heisler 
claims that he bought it. The Federal 
authorities have not yet taken up the case, 
as the detectives are to he allowed to col- 
lect more evidence before he is taken in 
charge by the Government. 


Richard Roberts has discontinued his 
jewelry business in Garneill, Mont. 







February 6, l&Ol. 


THE JEWELERS’ CIRCULAR— WEEKLY. — Westkrn Supplement. 


Cincinnati. 

BUSINESS OUTLOOK. 

The business outlook is good for the jewelers. 
The travelers who are out are sending in satisfac- 
tory orders. The mail orders are better than they 
were last year and collections are very good. 


The Diihme Jewelry Co. will hold an 
opening on Feb. 15. 

The Miller Jewelry Co. have added more 
men to their force in their repair and 
other departments. 

Joseph Noterman & Co. are taking stock 
and find they have had the most success- 
ful year in the history of the firm. 

Constant Van Reeth, importer and cut- 
ter of rough diamonds, is becoming popu- 
lar as a specialist in matching stones. 

Hugo Lindenberg, of Lindenberg & 
Fox, has started out on his first trip for 
this new firm, consisting of himself and 
Ed. J. Fox, son of Sol. Fox, of Fox 
Bros. & Co. 

Elmore Becker, son of Joseph Becker, 
western agent for the Fahys Watch Case 
Co., has resigned his position with S. & 
H. Gilsey to go with the new manufactur- 
ing concern of Peck, Selmeier & Peck. 

Gustave Fox received last week a letter 
from the Grand Lodge of Elks, acknowl- 
edging the receipt of the two magnificent 
badges ordered for retiring officials and 
complimenting him on the elegant work 
and beautiful design of the emblems. 

Rauch & Goldsmith, who suffered dis- 
aster through the fire of the Grand Opera 
House, which adjoins their building, have 
about recovered from the loss. They 
were fully insured. Charles Goldsmith 
and Louis Rauch, of the firm, will start 
on the road this week. 

The Wadsworth Watch Case Co. began 
this year to make solid gold cases in all 
sizes, and the demand has exceeded the 
output, they have been so popular. It 
will be the great feature of this company 
to turn out an unrivaled line for the Spring 
trade. 

Theodore Neuhaus & Co. are getting 
out an elaborately illustrated catalogue of 
medals, badges and class pins. The de- 
signs are all of his own conception and 
will represent months of labor. Mr. Neu- 
haus has a scrap book that has evoked 
considerable admiration among his friends. 
It has several hundred pages, 10x12, in 
which he has pasted all the new and unique 
designs as they have appeared in The 
Circular-Weekly and other journa's in 
his line of business. He has one book 
completed and is beginning on another. 
He has been three j'ears on the first, and 
it contains a valuable fund of ideas for the 
designer and manufacturer. 


Pacific Northwest. 

J. Lesser, Portland, Ore., reports the 
business for the month of January as good 
and says large goods have moved very rap- 
idly. 

The negro accused of stealing a dia- 
mond ring from A. N. Wright, Portland, 
Ore., has been held for trial with bonds 
■fixed at $750. 

T. H. Brown, Nelson, B. C., has just 
placed in his store a fine new standard 
regulator clock. It is seven feet eight 
Inches high and of French manufacture. 



diamonds. 

diamond 97fountin£^s, 

jCar^e stock of jCoosc and *7ffounted ^Diamonds 
always on hand. 


JOS. NOTERMAN & CO., 

Manufacturing Jewelers and Importers of Diamonds, 

t 509=511-513 Race Street, CINCINNATI, O. 






LINDENBERG & EOX, 

Wholesale Dealers in 

JMWMLRYand NOVMLTISS 


i 8 and 20 Hast Hourtb Street, 


A NEW Housn, 

WITH THE EATEST GOODS. 


CINCINNATI, OHIO. 



THE GUSTAVE FOX CO., 

Importers of Diamonds. Artistic Diamond Setters. 

Makers of the Standard Patented B. P. O. Elks Jewelry, horns 
reading B. P. O. E, Popular throughout the United States 


THE GUSTAVE FOX CO., 14 and 16 E. 4th Street, CINCINNATI, OHIO. 


SEE HERE! 

showing to our recent damage by tire our travelers tvill be late getting 
on the road. But wait for us, as we will hare a completely new and fresh 
stock of JEWELRY and NOVELTIES. We .just got them in. Send in your order. 
Butler Building. RAUCH & GOLDSMITH, Cincinnati, Ohio. 

We manufacture the Largest and Best 
line of 


HAIR ORNAMENTS 

in the country. 

CATALOGUE TO JOBBING TRADE ONLY. 

F. H. NOBLE & CO., 103 State St., Chicago. 


PHOTO BUTTON JEWELRY. 

NOT A FAD. HAS COME TO STAY. 

Send for our 48-page illustrated catalogue of the large^t assortment 
manufactured. We are headquarters for Photo Buttons, Advertising But- 
tons, Button Machines, Button Findings, and everything pertaining to 
the business. 

Our aim is to furnish goods at lower prices than they can be produced 
from other sources. We guarantee our prices and will meet any competi- 
tion. We never allow anybody to undersell us. 

5T. L0UI5 BUTTON CO., 

No. 620 N. Broadway, 

Mention The Jewelers' Cireular-Weekly. •• 5T. LOUIS, MO. 




76 


February 6, 1901. 


THE JEWELERS’ CIRCULAR-WEEKLY. 


Connecticut. ! 

W. L. Smith, Seymour, has recovered 
from his recent illness. 1 

^litchell & Son have opened for business ! 
in the rooms formerly occupied by the 
Mystic Bridge bank, Mystic. 

At the quarterly meeting held last week, 
the Southington Cutlery Co.’s directors de- 
clared a quarterly dividend of IJ^ per cent. 

Factory L, International Silver Co., at 
Wallingford, has begun operating on a 
nine hour schedule per day, from 7 a. m. 
until 5 p. M. 

P. J. Jeffrey and A. ^larkoff have formed 
a partnership at New London, for plating 
gold, silver, nickel and other metals, with 
an office at 18 Perry St. 

Joseph Pinsker, jeweler, of Portland, 
who has conducted a store on I^Iain St. for 
some time, is closing out his business pre- 


paratory to moving to some other town. 

The jewelry store of the late F. A. Shep- 
ard, Torrington, which was closed at his 
death, has been reopened, and the business 
will now be continued by Mrs. Shepard. 

Among the recent patents iss^ued to Meri- 
den residents were the following: To Con- 
stant K. Dechard, assignor to Interna- 
tional Silver Co., for heat insulator for 
handled vessels; to Henry M. Doolittle 
and J. A. Graham, for metal working tool. 

Rollin W. Plum, who died at Terryville, 
Jan. 29, was at one time in the clock busi- 
ness in that town. He was born at Wol- 
cott, Feb. 11. 1821, and in 1844 went to 
Terryville, where he worked for the old 
clock firm of H. Welton & Co. He late' 
became prominent in the lock manufactur- 
ing business. 

At the short calendar session of the Su- 
perior Court, New Haven, last week, the 



•f 

>«• 
>«• 

< 4 - 

*4- 
•4* 
<4- 
*4* 
•4- 
>4- 
<4* 
>4- 
*4- 
•4- 
1 ^ 
<4- 
*4- 
'4- 
*4- 
<4- 
«4- 
•4- 
•4* 
>4- 
<4* 
*4* 
►4- 
*4- 
•4- 
►4- 
*4- 
*4- 
*4- 
>4- 
*4* 
•4- 

>4- 
•4- 

*4- 
•4- 

< 4 ' 
>4- 
>4* 
*4- 
•4- 

^ *4- 


Made 

'On Honor," 
Backed by 
'Rock-Firm" 
Guaranty. 


Keep busy'. There is no dull season for the jeweler who handles 

SEARCH=LIQHT VAPOR LAMPS. 

He is ever happy and prosperous. Send for catalogue and 
terms. Sample on approval to show its good points and our 
faith in it. 

MAXIMUM LIGHT AT MIXIMUM COST. LAMPS FOR STORES, HOMES, 
CHURCHES, HALLS AXD STREETS. 

t SEARCH=LIGHT MFQ. CO., 358 Dearborn St., CHICAGO, ILL. 


I 


f ^ ^ STERLING Incomplete 

\ZIICUI y 1011 SILVER. Table Service- 



case of the Barker Silver Co., Milford, in 
which a motion was made for an amend- 
ment of the order limiting the time for the 
presentation of claims against the concern 
was to have come up for a hearing, but 
was postponed for a week. 

Selectman Hurlburt, of New Britain, re- 
ceived a communication last week from At- 
tleboro, Mass., stating that a company 
manufacturing jewelry would like to locate 
in that town if water power could be ob- 
tained and a low rate of insurance and cheap 
labor could be procured. The concern em- 
ploys 42 hands and has a pay roll of $300 
a week. 

The annual meeting of the Holmes & 
Edwards Mutual Benefit Association was 
held Monday evening at the factory, 
Bridgeport. The following officers were 
elected for the current year: President. 

William Field; vice-president. Patrick Car- 
ney; secretary, Theodore E. Brown; treas- 
urer, William H. Ryburn; auditors, A. G. 
Baldwin and George A. Murphy. 

The annual meeting of the J. D. Ber- 
gen Co. was held at the factory of the 
company at Meriden, last Wednesday. 
The following were elected directors: 
James D. Bergen, N. L. Bradley, E. J. 
Doolittle, C. Berry Peets, C. E. Stockder, 
Jr., and Clarence P. Bradley. James D. 
Bergen was elected president and treas- 
urer, and C. E. Stockder, Jr., secretary. 
A dividend of 6 per cent, was declared. 

Hartford’s new silver company, to be 
known as the Simeon L. and George H. 
Rogers Co., having their headquarters at 
Hartford, with works also in Wallingford, 
will begin operations in the course of a 
few days. The Messrs. McFayden, John 
and Samuel, who were for years with the 
William Rogers Mfg. Co., are actively 
identified with the new works. It is ex- 
pected that 100 hands will be employed 
after the plant is fully at work. 


“It Increases Your Sales.” 



NO TROUBLE TO KEEP STOCK CLEAN. 


ANDERTON & EBERHARDT, Jewelers. Dayton, 
Ohio, write; "We have been using your Metal Ring 
Tags for over a year and would not be without them 
for many times their cost. Their use has enabled us to 
keep our stock in a fresh and salable condition with very 
little trouble, and has largely increased our ring sales. ’ 

THEY WILL NOT SCRATCH THE RINGS. 

A. W. I.EEDY. Jeweler, Marion, Ind., writes: "1 
think your Metal Tags fill a long-felt want among the 
jewelry trade, especially in this natural gas country-, 
where we have to do so much cleaning and polishing. 

ONCE TRIED, ALWAYS USED. 

Send SI. 00 for sample box of 200 tags. 

THE DIAMOND TAG CO., Dayton, Ohio. 


THE JEWELERS’ CIRCULAR-WEEKLY. 


77 


February 6, 1901. 


Pittsburgh. 

S. Maltinsky, Braddock, is having an 
auction sale before removal. 

Murray Henry, formerly in business in 
McKeesport, Pa., is now with the Key- 
stone Jewelry Co. 

W. W. Wattles, of W. W. Wattles & 
Sons, and Mrs. Wattles are spending sev- 
eral weeks at Atlantic City. 

Charles E. Graves, of Charles E. Graves 
& Co., Chicago, was in the city last 
week, buying import goods. 

O. O. Reams, Wilkinsburg, Pa., has 
completed his auction sale and will go 
out of the jewelry business. 

J. W. McKean has discontinued his 
store at Monessen, Pa., and will hereafter 
devote .his time to the store at Charleroi, 
Pa. 

The Pittsburgh Jewelry Co., of Eifth 
Ave. and of Smithfield St., will remove 
into one store, at 443 Smithfield St., at the 
close of the present sales. 


F. W. Koehler, Sharon, Pa., will re- 
move April 1 into the building now oc- 
cupied by Mr. Brady, who is selling out 
to quit the jewelry business. 

The sad information of the death of A. 
Schroeder, Niles, O., was received in the 
city last week. Mr. Schroeder was 35 
years in the jewelry business. 

Graf & Niemann, of the East End, have 
found a down town location on 6th St., 
opposite the Hotel Anderson, and will re- 
move very shortly. The situation is a 
very good one. 

The W. J. Johnston Co. will have their 
annual meeting of stockholders on Satur- 
day next, for the election of officers. The 
company have opened their factory on the 
fifth floor in the Verner building, which 
is under the supervision of Mr. Kraus. 
Extensive engraving and watch making 
departments will be started shortly. W. 
J. Johnston, president of the company, 
goes east this week. 

Out-of-town visitors last week were; 


Charles Loughman, McKee’s Rocks, Pa.; 
A. Moscher, East Palestine, O.; H. H. 
Weylman, Kittanning, Pa.; R. Bibby, Wil- 
kinsburg, Pa.; Jacob Wolf, Suterville, Pa.; 
John Linnenbrink, Rochester, Pa.; Wil- 
liam Hunt, Uniontown, Pa.; Harvey 
Fritz, Oil City, Pa.; Frank Weylman, Kit- 
tanning, Pa.; F. B. McKinley, Washing- 
ton, Pa.; J. C. Rhodes, Homestead, Pa.; 
E. A. Bloser, New Kensington, Pa.; 
George V. Brady, Washington, Pa.; 
Numa Evard, Turtle Creek, Pa.; A. R. 
Fleming, Wilkinsburg, Pa.; Mr. Roy, 
Braddock, Pa.; D. L. Cleland, Butler, Pa.; 
A. C. Graul, Sharpsburg, Pa.; John Z. 
Simpson, Blairsville, Pa.; P. J. Manson, 
Jeannette, Pa. 


Mrs. Anna Migel has retired from the 
jewelry and pawnbroking business in Gal- 
veston, Tex. 

King, Palmer & Byrd have opened a 
new stock of jewelry and notions in Sul- 
phur Springs, Tex. 



60 MACHINES IN ONE DAY 


shipped from our factory is a good indication of the esteem in which EATON-ENGLE MACHINES are 
held. This shipment embraced nearly every State in the Union. 

What’s the use doing work by old-fashioned methods when by the expenditure of a small amount you 
can put yourself in a position to do work quickly and well ? The samples of work which we send out to 
every inquirer for a catalogue are all done by our office boys and give a good general idea of the character 
of the engraving which our machine will do. Have you had a sample yet ? If not, let us send you one. 

> If you will send us two 2=cent stamps, to cover the postage, we will send to you a beautiful aluminum | 

• memorandum booK engraved with your name. This booR is worth a quarter of anyone’s money. i 

• This offer applies only to Jewelers, Opticians or WatchmaKers employed in jewelry stores. It is ? 

• not meant for errand boys and is good only until Feb. 20. • 

We sell you these machines for a small first payment and the balance monthly; in doing this you 

have the use of the machine and the money while we wait. Isn’t this a liberal proposition ? 

Let’s hear from you to-day, with any questions you may care to ask. You’ll get a prompt and 
courteous reply. 

THE EATON & GLOVER CO. , 87 Nassau St., New York. 


78 


THE JEWELERS’ CIRCULAR-WEEKLY. 


February 6, 1901. 


A Few 
Questions. 


Do }'OU want to be known in j-our city 
or town as THE watch dealer? Do you 
want to be able to sell a better gold-filled 
watch case at a lower price than any of }'our 
competitors? Do you want to do this and 
still make a larger profit than you are now 
making ? Do you want to control your own 
designs and be beyond competition? If you 
do, write for our special proposition. Re- 
member, BELL GOLD=FILLED WATCH 
CASES are sold direct to you — no middle- 
man’s profit. 



Any emblem or monogram, plain or en- 
gfine-turned, made to order for from 25 cents 
to |i.oo over price of plain polished case. 


The “ Bell Special ” is the only gold- 
filled case made with the amount and 
quality of gold stamped in the case. 


BUY OF THE MAKER. 


The Bell Watch Co. 

Factory, Mansfield, 0. 


GENERAL OFFICES. 

Champlain Bldg., CHICAGO, ILL. 


DEMAREST & ECKERSON, 

Formerly with B. & W. B SMITH. 

ARTISTIC Show cases 


and 


STORE FIXTURES, 

435 «& 437 Seventh Ave., NewYork. 


ALL WORK FIRST-CLASS IN EVERY PARTICULAR. 

TELEPHOKE CALL, 388!) 38th ST. ; 


Kansas City. 

The Jaccard Jewelry Co. are taking their 
annual inventory. 

S. R. Abney, 12081^ Grand Ave., has 
been on the sick list with grip for a few 
days. 

R. J. Gilbert, of the Jaccard Jeyvelry Co., 
is again in the store and is feeling mucli 
better since his rest. 

H. E. Clevidence, with the Jaccard Jew- 
elry Co., has been called to Mount Morris, 
111., by the death of his father. 

J. B. Schmeltz, T231J Grand Ave., had 
a fire last week, which caused damage 
of about $200; fully covered by insurance. 

J. R. Mercer is invoicing and preparing 
for the alterations and improvements in 
his store, which he expects will be started 
the first of the month. 

Charles E. Stafford, who assisted J. R. 
Mercer during the holiday rush, is travel- 
ing for William Birmingham & Son, man- 
ufacturers of leather goods. 

C. B. Norton, president of the Nortcn- 
Paulson Jewelry Co., expects to go with 
the Commercial Club on their trip 
through Oklahoma and Texas. They 
leave this week and will go as far as Fort 
Worth. 

Jan. 25 Senator Farris introduced a bill 
in the Senate at Jefferson City, Mo., to tax 
department stores. In many respects the 
bill is different from the one which passed 
two years ago, which was declared uncon- 
stitutional by the Supreme Court. Sena- 
tor Farris believes that his bill has been 
so carefully drawn up that the flaws that 
were found by the Supreme Court in the 
40th Assembly have been avoided. 

Among the out-of-town jewelers who 
called on the local trade last week were; 
Otto Burklund, Osawatomie, Kan.; Mr. 
Fry, with S. M. De Tar, of Edgerton, 
Kan.; J. E. Hathaway, Parkville, Mo.; T. 
W. Black, Kearney, Mo.; J. B. Hampton, 
Colby, Kan.; A. A. Cox, Mt. Vernon, Mo.; 
C. B. Libbey, Weir City, Kan.; Benjamin 
Hollenbeck, Springhill, Kan.; Harry Da- 
vis, Topeka, Kan.; Dick Kolstad, Pleas- 
ant Hill. Mo.; Walter Sperling, Seneca, 
Kan.; C. A. Clement, Springfield, Mo.; 
Walter Starcke, Junction City, Mo.; Mr. 
Wilson, St. Joseph, Mo.; A. Kroencke, 
Concordia, Mo.; Mr. Raines, of Raines 
Bros., Tarkio, Mo.; Harry Bower, Del- 
phos, Kan.; T. H. Keerncerter, South Mc- 
-\lester, I. T. ; W. F. Kirkpatrick, Win- 
chester, Kan.; B. T. Baley, Monett, Mo., 
and Mr. Waddell, of Sams & Waddell, of 
Clinton, Mo., was in town, accompanied 
by his daughter. 


The jewelry store of A. H. Jenks, Co- 
hocton, N. Y., will move to Coudersport, 
Pa. 


Birmingham, Ala. 

W. L. Lawler, a jeweler of Nashville, 
has opened a business at Centerville. 

John T. Adams, Jr., Talladega, who was 
recently married, is back from his wed- 
ding trip to New Orleans. 

F. E. Dey, Greenville, has opened a 
branch business at Evergreen, which will 
be in charge of Harry Dey. 

A. B. Swift, who has been with jeweler 
R. Heine, Talladega, for a year, has re- 
turned to his home in Indiana. 

T. J. Irwin, Athens, has enlarged his 
business to such an extent that he has been 
forced to employ additional help. 

F. W. Bromberg, who succeeded to the 
jewelry business of E. Gluck, has gone to 
New York and other markets to buy a 
new stock of goods. The old Gluck stock 
was closed out at auction. 

J. J. B. McElrath, formerly of Center, 
Ala., has located in the jewelry business 
at Woodlawn. Mr. McElrath was post- 
master at Center 15 years, during which 
time he learned the jewelry business. 

A. Brown & Son, Florence, are now in 
one of the prettiest stores in the south, 
which has been fully stocked with jewelry, 
bric-a-brac and optical goods. This firm 
were established in Florence in 1869 and 
have been among the leaders in Lauder- 
dale county’s business interests ever since. 
Until the new organization A. Brown had 
charge of the optical department with 
Robert L. Brown at the bench. Their 
store has been appropriately named th" 
“Gem of Beauty.” 


I , 




I 


' 


Savannah, Ga. 

J. B. King, of J. B. & L. A. King, East- 
man, Ga., died recently. 

Paul Arndt, Charleston, S. C., has given 
a chattel mortgage for $700. 

J. iH. Koch, of Koch & Sylvan, was re- 
cently sued in the City Court for $1,000 
damage by Annette Coles, who claimed 
to have been injured by the collapse of 
steps of a house she rented from Mr. 
Koch. The jury awarded her a verdict 
of $500. 

R. A. Ferris, formerly of Beaufort, S. 
C., is under arrest in Savannah on a charge 
of having stolen from the residence of A. 
M. Greenfield, jeweler, Beaufort, with 
whom he boarded, a diamond ring valued 
at $300 and $30 in money. Ferris has 
confessed his guilt and told of how he 
had the stones taken from the ring 
and had them reset in other rings, one of 
which he had given to a female friend and 
the other he had pawned. Mr. Greenfield 
has recovered his jewelry, but intends 
prosecuting Ferris, who will be taken to 
Beaufort for trial. 


The 


Mercantile National Bank 


OF THE CITY OF NEW YORK, 

BROADWAY AND DEY STREET, 

Solicits Accounts from the Jewelry Trade. 


February 6, 1901. 


THE JEWELERS’ CIRCULAR-WEEKLY, 


79 


Boston. 


F. O. Fuller, with D. C. Percival & Co., 
returned early this week Irom a trip 
through several of the Southern States. 

The annual meeting and election ot 
officers of the Boston Jewelers’ Club will 
be held Feb. 12, at some Boston hotel yet 
to be selected. 

The Tiffany Jewelry Co. have added the 
agency for the Hartford Silver Co., Hart- 
ford, Conn., and have placed in position a 
handsome cabinet for the display of sam- 
ples. 

Charles May & Son, watch materials, 
are arranging to move from their present 
quarters on Bromfield St, to the Marl- 
borough building, 403 Washington St., 
where they have rented a room from the 
E. Howard Clock Co. 

Inspector Shields, of Chief Watts’s of- 
fice, arrested on warrant, Thursday, Rus- 
sell M. Zuver, 25 years old, Milton, Mass., 
for illegal conveyance of a watch valued 
at $34, on Nov. 27, 1900, held under a 
conditional contract of sale by Freeman 
H. Kendall, jeweler, 830 Washington St. 

The officials of the American Waltham 
Watch Co. say that the output at the fac- 
tory at Waltham is running much ahead 
of that in recent previous years. Orders 
are continually coming in from all parts 
of the country, and these orders are suffi- 
cient to keep the company running as at 
present for several months to come. 

The past was a “home” week at Smit’i, 
Patterson & Co.’s, A. A. Abbott, mana- 
ger of the branch at Montreal, T. A. 
Brady, of the Upper Provinces, and F. A. 
Mansfield, of the Maritime Provinces, all 
being in Boston. M. N. Smith, senior 
member of the firm, entertained the above 
named gentlemen at the Algonquin Club, 
Commonwealth Ave. 

Among the buyers in town last week 
were: C. B. Hammond, Nashua, N. H.; 

A. W. Avery, Plymouth, N. H.; H. P. N. 
Dahl, Maynard, Mass. ;N. C. Nelson, Con- 
cord, N. H.; G. W. Duckworth, Paw- 
tucket, R. I.; L. R. Hapgood, Dover, 
N. H.; W. S. Lee, Salem, Mass.; Albin 
Keith, of J. A. Merrill & Co., Portland, 
Me.; W. A. Kemp, East Pepperell, Mass. 


An article which will appeal to retail 
jewelers, haberdashers and all others who 
advertise their wares by window display, is 
a unique and highly practical window 
reacher manufactured by Francis & Hall, 
52 Columbia St., Newark, N. J. This de- 
vice is three and one-half feet in length and 
is termed by its makers a mechanical ex- 
tension of the arm. By its aid one can 
reach from the extreme corner of a window 
any article, from a cut glass decanter to 
a ring, without disturbing the rest of the 
exhibit. The points are covered with 
leather for the use of jewelers, to prevent 
the scratching of delicate articles. The 
device will undoubtedly meet with success 
among the retail jewelers. 


WM. E. WOOD. 


WM. P. NEWHALL. 


Peter L Rrlder €o., 

SILVERSMITHS, 


814 REAL ESTATE TRUST BUILDING, S. E. CORNER f 

CHESTNUT AND BROAD STREETS, | 

PHILADELPHIA, PA. j 

medals. grape UlorR. I 

Coping gups. 

A SPECIALTY. \ 



I Adelphi Silver Plate Co. I 


are showing a line of fine 

SILVE.R=PLATE.D HOLLOW WARE. 

for the Spring Trade, in a great variety of Artistic Designs. 

JOHNSGHIMPF&SONS 

have prepared a complete 
line of exquisite . . . 

STERLING 

SILVER 

WARE, 

the sale of which is in- 
creased by remarkably 
low prices. 

ON EXHIBIT AT 

Factory: Cor. Pearl and Prospect^Sts., Brooklyn. 20 JOHN ST., NEW YORK. 


t 

t 

t 

X* 

¥ 

¥• 

rO 



IMPORTERS 

AND 


JOBBERS OF 


DIAMONDS 

WATCHES 

JEWELRY 


9-11-13 MAIDEN LANE, 

NEW YORK. 

62-64 STATE STREET, 

ALBANY, N, Y. 


so 


THE JEWELERS’ CIRCULAR-WEEKLY, 


February 6, 1901. 



We beg to announce that we have purchased the watch case 
manufacturing business of Bates & Bacon, Attleboro, Mass., and will 
continue, at this place, the manufacture of their well-known brands:. 


"FAVORITE," guaranteed for 25 years. 

"ROYAL," " " 20 

"REGAL," " " 10 

"PURITAN," " " 5 

We assume all guarantees made by Bates *& Bacon, and will treat them in 
the same liberal way as we do our own guarantees, viz. ! 

A NEW CASE OF THE SAME GRADE GIVEN FREE OF CHARGE 

for any case that fails to wear the full guaranteed period, without 
conditions, without charge and without quibbling. 

We trust it will gratify the trade at large, and especially those 
who have heretofore handled the Bates & Bacon product, to know that the 
latter's business has passed into such ownership as will rigorously 
maintain the quality, fulfill the guarantees, uphold and extend the 
prestige of the goods and continue on a broader scale the honest methods 
of the makers in relation to the trade. 

Mr. E. R. Crippen, formerly manager of the Bates & Bacon business, 
will be in charge of our New York office and attend to the distribution 
of our product among the Eastern Trade. 

Mr. J. R. Davidson, in charge of our Chicago office, will increase 
his line by the addition of the Bates & Bacon grades and attend to the 
distribution of our product in his territory. 

Yours respectfully. 


PHILADELPHIA WATCH CASE CO. 


February 6, 1901. 


THE JEWELERS’ CIRCULAR-WEEKLY. 


81 


LETTERS TO THE EDITOR. 


THE ELGIN DECISION AND THE WALTHAM 
DECISION. 


New York, Jan. 21, 1901. 
Editor The Jewelers’ Circular-Weekly: 

I have read the interview with President 
Hulburd, of the Elgin National Watch Co., 
contained in your last issue, in reference 
to the decision of the United States Su- 
preme Court in the case of Elgin National 
Watch Co. vs. Illinois Watch Case Co. I 
was one of the counsel for the plaintiff in 
the case of American iWaltham Watch Co. 
vs. U. S. Watch Co., brought and tried 
in the Supreme Court of Massachusetts, 
and I was also counsel for the plain- 
tiff in the case of the American Waltham 
Watch Co. vs. Sandman, brought in the 
United States Circuit Court for the South- 
ern District of New York and decided 
by Judge Townsend. Both of the last 
named cases were tried and decided upon 
the theory of unfair competition and not 
on the theory of infringement of a trade- 
mark, and there is nothing in the decision 
of the Supreme Court in the Elgin case 
which in any way contravenes the doctrine 
laid down in the two Waltham cases. The 
opinion of Judge Holmes in the Massa- 
chusetts case on appeal to the full bench 
of the Supreme Court contains the follow- 
ing: 

“It was found ait the hearing that the word 
‘Waltbam/ which originally was used by the plain- 
tiff in a merely geographical sense, now, by loing 
use in connection with plaintiff’s watches, has 
come to have a secondary meaning as the desig- 
nation of watches which the public has become 
accustomed to associate with the name. * * * 

“Whatever might have been the doubts some 
years ago, we think that it is now pretty well' 
settled that the plaintiff, merely on the strength 
of having been the first in the field, may put later 
comers to the trouble of taking such reasonable 
precautions as are commercially practicable to pre- 
vent their lawful names and advertisements from 
deceitfully diverting the plaintiff’s custom. 

“We cannot go behind the finding that such 
a deceitful diversion is the effect and intended 
effect of the marks in question. W'e cannot go 
behind the finding that it is practicable to dis- 
tinguish the defendant’s watches from those of the 
plaintiff, and that it' ought to be done.” 

The Court then enjoined the defendant 
from doing three things. -First, from us- 
ing the term ‘Waltham Watches” to de- 
scribe the defendant’s watches at any time 
or in any way; second, from placing the 
word "Waltham” on the dial of a watch, 
third, from placing the words "Wal- 
tham, Mass.” upon the plate of a 
watch as a business address without 
coupling with them some accompanying 
statement which should distinguish clearly 
the defendant’s watches from those made 
by the plaintiff. The statement finally de- 
termined upon and ordered to be placed 
upon the plate of the defendant's watches 
was, “A New Watch Company at Walt- 
I ham, Est’d 1886.” 

(American Waltham Watch Co. vs. U. S. 
Watch Co., 173 Mass. 85.) 

The case of the American Waltham 
Watch Co. vs. Sandman (96 Fed. Rep. 330) 
was brought against the agent of the Co- 
I lumbia Watch Co., a concern also located 
I at Waltham, and the relief sought was an 
i injunction against the use by the defendant 
i of the words “Waltham, Mass.” upon the 
I plate of the watch unless accompanied by 
some distinguishing statement. The head- 



I BUY THE BEST! 

i PAT. CELLULOID RING TRAYS i 



Are THE MOST ATTRACTIVE, | 

THE MOST DURABLE, ? 

ALWAYS CLEAN, because washable. • 
OVER 35,000 SOLD DURING THE PAST FIVE ? 

YEARS. i 

I will send (prepaid) Ebonized Trays as follows: J 

For - 42 or 48 rings, size 11 % x 7 %, - $2.00 • 

28 .. .1 ^ . 1.75 • 

30 “ “ 8% X 554, • 1.75 • 

24 “ “ 9)4 X 5%, - 1.75 ? 

Bevel Frame 12 “ “ 8 x 554, • 1.25 • 

8 “ " 9H X 154, - 1.00 • 


C A nr r> C C. H C D (Established 1871 as The New York Morocco Case Co.), 

. A. I 85 NASSAU STREET, NEW YORK. 

Telephone. 5722 Cortlandt. 









4--f4 


THE JEWELERS’ CIRCULAR-WEEKLY. 


February 6, 1901. 


* ♦ ♦ 4 “ 4 - ♦ 4 - 4 - ^ 



♦ 

♦ 

♦ 

♦ 

♦ 


♦ 

♦ 

♦ 

♦ 


♦ 


REAL EBONY 


Combination Traveling Set. 



Our Mr. William Andrews is now in the South, Mr. 
A. Weiss is West and Mr. H. Greenthal is East show- 
ing our Fine New Line of Real Ebony and Rosewood Toilet 
Articles, as well as the Latest Novelties in Leather Goods. 



J. J. COHIV, 

Manufacturer of Leather Goods 

And Importer of Ebony and Rosewood Toilet Articles, 

35 ITIAinBINi LANE, - - - NEW YORK. 

CHICAGO OFFICE, 131 WABASH AVE. 


I 

t 

X 

■f 

■f 

-f 

X 

♦ 

4 





No. 329. 


No. 218. 


No. 327. 


No. 306. 


No. 325. 


/|1 
No. 239. 

PITZELE «c BASCHKOPF, 

fINE DIAMOND MOUNTINGS, 

la Maiden Lane, ... - New York. 

Our styles and prices can’t be beat. Call and be conTinced. No. 349. 



20th CENTURY WINDOW GRIPPER. 



I.ength, 3'/i feet. Price, nickel-plated, 83.00. 


A mechanical extension of the arm for arranRing 
articles in show windows and for removing displayed 
articles instantly. 



IP R, A. N O I S & H AI-iI-i . 52 Columbia Street. NEWARK, N. J. 

KEEP A COPY OF EVERYTHING! 

A Pen Carbon Letter Copying Hook Free. No press required. Notes, Bills, Business 
and Society Correspondence copied while you write. We make this offer for a short time 
to introduce Blair’s Ink-.Making (iold Fountain Pens for writing and manifolding. In these 
pens we gire a year’s supply of the best water proof ink free. Produced by their ink- 
making cartridge and merely filling the holder with water. Either $].15 and j?2.00 and up- 
ward or all for a short time same price. A liberal discount by the dozen to the trade. 

BI^IR’S FOUNTAIN PEN CO. (W), 163 Broadway, New York. 


note in the said case, which correctly rep- 
resents the decision, says: 

“The word ‘Waltham’ on watches, while orig- 
inally used in a geographical sense only, has by 
its long continued use by the American Waltham 
Watch Co. acquired a secondary meaning as a 
designation of the watches manufactured by that 
company; and its use by another manufacturer 
without some accompanying statement to clearly 
distinguish its watches from those manufactured 
by such company and in a manner calculated to, 
and which does, deceive purchasers, constitutes 
unfair competition.” 

In this case the decree enjoined the dc 
fendant from using the words “Waltham. 
Mass.” as the business address unless ac- 
companied by the statement “A New 
Watch Company at Waltham, est’d 1895.” 
It will thus be seen that both of 
the foregoing cases were based upon 
the theory of unfair competition. In 
the Elgin case, on the contrary, the 
opinion of the Court expressly states 
that the issue under consideration was 
whether the word “Elgin” was a lawfully 
registered trade-mark. The language of 
the Court on this point is as follows: 

“It is to be observed, however, that the que.< 
tion we are considering is not whether this record 
makes out a case of false representation or per- 
fidious dealing or unfair competition, but whether 
appellant had the exclusive right to use the word 
‘Elgin’ as against all the world. Was it a lawfully 
registered trade-mark? If the absolute right to the 
use of the word as a trade-mark belonged to the ap- 
pellant, then the Circuit Court had jurisdiction 
under the statute to award relief for infringement; 
but if it were not a lawfully registered trade-mark, 
then the Circuit Court of Appeals correctly held 
that jurisdiction could not be maintained.” 

The Court, however, guards itself from 
misunderstanding by using the following 
language: 

“But where an alleged trade-mark is not in it- 
self a goo-d trade-mark, yet the use of the word 
has come to denote the particular manufacturer or 
vendor, relief against unfair competition or perfid- 
ious dealing will be awarded by requiring the use 
of the word by another to be confined to its pri- 
mary sense by such limitations as will prevent 
misapprehension on the question of origin.” 

President Hulburd is, therefore, clearly 
right in his analysis of the opinion of the 
Supreme Court in the Elgin case. All 
that the Court decides in that case is that 
the word “Elgin” was not a good technict-il 
trade-mark. The doctrine of the Waltham 
cases still remains sound. It is still true 
that where a geographical name has by 
long continued use acquired a secondary 
meaning as the designation of the goods 
of one merchant, the use of such geo- 
graphical name by another merchant with- 
out some accompanying statement to 
clearly distinguish his goods from those 
manufactured by the first merchant, or its 
use in any manner which is calculated to 
deceive purchasers into supposing that the 
goods of the second manufacturer are 
those of the first, will be enjoined. 

Yours truly, 

F. L. Crawford. 


J. A. Atchley has opened a jewelry busi- 
ness at Athens. Tenn. 

Detectives of Rochester, N. Y., are 
making a search for two men who com- 
mitted a theft at the jewelry store of 
Herman Roeher. 238 North St., that city, 
last week. While Mr. Roeber was away, 
two men entered and while one showed 
the clerk a broken watch the other stole 
a ring worth $60, They escaped before 
the theft was detected. 


February 6, 190il. 


THE JEWELERS’ CIRCULAR-WEEKLY. 


83 


The Latest Patents. 


ISSUE OP J*N. 29. 1901. 

666,719. EYEGLASSES. George W. Wells, 
Southbridge, Mass. Filed Nov. 14, 1900. 
Serial No. 36.440. (No model.) 



In eyeglasses, the combination with the frame- 
post, having a recessed end, and the end of the 
spring and nose-guard fitting in said recessed end, 
of a fastening-screw having a head with straight 
edges, and a plate extending in the recessed end 
of the frame-post, between the head of the fasten- 
ing-screw and the nose-guard, and having an ex- 
tension thereon to engage one of the straight edges 
on the head of the fastening-screw. 

666,731. ELECTROMEMCAL EYEGLASSES. 
Philibert Balme, Izieux, France. Filed 
March 26, 1900. Serial No. 10,165. (No 
model.) 



In a device of the class set forth, the combina- 
tion with the frame of the eyeglass, the halves of 
which are made of different metals (copper and 
zinc), of a suitable projection on each half of the 
frame, between which projections electric dis- 
charges may be produced when the eyeglass is 
used on the nose. 

666.821. MUSICAL INSTRUMENT. Ferdi- 
nand ScHAUB, Jersey City, N. J., assignor to 
the F. G. Otto & Sons, Incorporated, same 
place. Filed Sept. 5, 1899. Serial No. 729,530. 
(No model.) 



In a mechanical musical instrument, the com- 
bination with a music-producing mechanism, 
adapted to be operated by note-disks, of a recepta- 


cle for the note-disks, and two horizontally-swing- 
ing arms pivoted to the receptacle and to a suit- 
able support, and means for conveying the disks 
from said receptacle into playing position and from 
playing position into said receptacle. 

666,855. DETACHABLE BUTTON. William 
U. Raine, Milwaukee, Wis. Filed July 16, 
1900. Serial No. 23,760. (No model.) 



<>66,856. RETINOSCOPE. Elmer Le Roy 
Ryer, New York, N. Y. Filed Sept. 17, 1900. 
Serial No. 20.241. (No model.) 



In an instrument for the examination of the eyes, 
the exterior casing forming a dark chamber and 
having at its outer end the eye-opening, and the 
movable observing-tube within and less in diameter 
than said casing and having at the operator’s end 
the light-directing means, combined with the light- 
tube leading to said observing-tube and through 
which the rays of light pass to said light-directing 
means, the said casing being provided with means 
for the reception of the lens or lenses intermediate 
the outer end of said movable tube and the afore- 
said opening. 

666,927. EYEGLASSES. Robert B. Finch, 
Denver, Col., assignor of one-half to Edwin 
T. Jones, same place. Filed April 18, 1900. 
Serial No. 13,403. (No model.) 



In eyeglasses, the combination of a rigid bridge 
provided at each extremity with a keeper having 
two separated arms, and a guard provided with a 
lever having separated lugs adapted to pass be- 
tween the arms of the keeper, the keeper-arms and 
the lugs of the lever being provided with coincid- 
ing apertures, a fulcrum-pin passing through said 
apertures, and a spring surrounding said pin be- 
tween the lugs of the lever and having a tendency 
to cause the nosepieces of the guard to grasp the 
nose of the wearer. 


<166,928. EYEGLASSES. Robert B. Finch, 
Denver, Col., assignor of one-half to Edwin 
T. Jones, same place. Filed June 4, 1900. 
Serial No. 18,929. (No model.) 



In eyeglasses the combination with the eyeglass- 
frame or lens-mountings, of a bridge having bends 
at the extremities of its bow portion, said 
bends being substantially perpendicular to the 
plane of the lenses, and projections extend- 
ing forwardly from the bends to the frame 
or lens-mountings; and spring-held lever-arms 
extending across the bridge, and suitably 
fulcrumed on the frame or mountings, their inner 
extremities or nosepiece being normally spring- 
pressed toward the bow of the bridge whereby 
th.ere is cooperative gripping action between the 
nosepieces of the lever-arms and the bow of the 
bridge, in a plane substantially perpendicular to 
that of the lenses. 

666,929. EYEGLASSES. Robert B. Finch, 
Denver, Col., assignor of one-half to Edwin 
T. Jones, same place. Filed Oct. 18, 1900. 
Serial No. 33,529. (No model.) 



In eyeglasses the combination with the frame 
or lens-mountings, a bridge, and spring-held lever- 
arms fulcrumed on the frame or mounting, of a 
nosepiece composed of two distinct parts, one of 
which is carried by the lever-arm and has a ten- 
dency to move toward the bridge, whereby there 
is cooperative gripping action between the bridge 
and nosepiece in a plane substantially perpendicu- 
lar to the plane of the lenses, the other part being 
relatively stationary and extending downwardly 
from the bridge. 

<>66,985. CARVING AND ENGRAVING MA- 
CHINE. Attilio Stiria, New York, N. Y. 
Filed March 8, 1900. Serial No. 7,850. (No 
model.) 

666,997. REGULATOR FOR TIMEPIECES. 
Archibald Bannatyne, Waterbury, Conn., 
assignor to the Waterbury Clock Co., same 
place. Filed Nov. 30, 1900. Serial No. 38,118. 
(No model.) 


A hair-spring regulator adapted to be pivotally 
secured in place, and consisting of a lever provided 
with an operating-arm, a spring-receiving arm, an 
arm connecting the operating-arm with the spring- 




FOR THE, NEW YEAR ! 


TO THE RETAIL JEWELRY TRADE; 

We offer the result of more than Fifty Years of 
Ring Making, confident that the methods we now employ enable us to furnish you the most 
desirable goods for QUALITY, STYLE and PRICE obtainable. 

are most worthy of your attention. Do not 
neglect their purchase. Goods sent on 
approval to responsible parties. 

M. B. BRYANT CO., 7 MAIDEN LANE. NEW YORK. 



S4 


THE JEWELERS’ CIRCULAR-WEEKLY. 


February 6, 1901. 




j Most Compact 

I 

i AND THINNEST 

i DUST-PROOF 

j Open-Face Gold Case 

• 

I MADE IN THE WORLD 

t FOR 

I AMERICAN MOVEMENTS. 

• 

J Made in all shapes, engine turned, 

• engraved or plain. 



Colby PatenL April 24, 1894 

! Dubois Watch Case Co.. 


21-23 Maiden Lane, N, Y. 


receiving arm, and a spring-fender or guard arm 
extending alongside of ttie staff of the balance- 
wheel of the movement containing the regulator. 
1*07,002. BUTTON. Francisco Clark, Durango, 
Mexico. Filed Oct. 13, 1900. Serial No. 32,- 
950. (No model.) 


A button, comprising a main head provided with 
a shank having an angular cross-bar at its free end. 
a hinged head having a locking-tongue arranged be- 
tween said cross-bar and the main head, and in 
sliding engagement with the cross-bar, the tongue 
being provided, on the side facing away from the 
main head, with a central recess of an angular 
shape corresponding to that of the cross-bar, and 
with an end recess of greater width than the cen- 
tral recess, the end recess having an inclined wall 
extending toward the central recess, and a spring- 
pressed plunger engaging the locking-tongue on 
the side facing toward the main head. 

Design 33,?>78. BADGE. Henry \V. Harvey, 



Providence, R. I., assignor to Harvey & Otis, 
same place. Filed Dec. 15, 1900. Serial No. 
40,053. Term of patent 14 years. 

Design 33,979. WATCHCASE. Henri Victor 
Degoumois, La Chaux de Fonds, Switzer- 



land. Filed Nov. 24. 1900. Serial No. 37,695. 
Term of patent 14 years. 


Design 33,9.sO. PURSE. Nannie R. Mitchell, 
Paris, Ky. Filed Nov. 24. 1900. Serial No. 



37,6S0. Term of patent seven years. 

Design 33.9S2. TABLE -FORK. Charles F. 
Smith, New Britain, Conn., assignor to the 


o o o o 


Landers, Frary & Clark, same place. Filed 
Jan. 2. 1901. Serial No. 41,833. Term of 
patent seven years. 

Design 34,015. DEM AGNETIZER. Otto M. 



Knoblock, South Bend. Ind. Filed Jan. 7, 
1901. Serial No. 42,452. Term of patent seven 
years. 

Trade-Mark 35,840. EYE - LOTION. George 
Wheeler Carnrick, New York, N. Y. Filed 
Jan. 4, 1901. 

OSMOSINE. 

Essential feature. — The word *‘0 s m o s i n e.” 
Used since May 22, 1900. 



AND STYLOGRAPHIC PENS FOR EXPORT. 
DIAMOND POINT PEN CO., 102 J Beekman Street, N. Y., U.S.A. 

Established 1879. Manufacturer of i 

LOUIS w. HRABA, (i fine Ceatber Goods, ? 

29 East 19th St., New York. Exclusively for the Jewelry Trade. X 


EXPIRED PATENTS. 


[Reported specially for The Jewelers’ Circular- 
Weekly by R. W. Bishop, Patent Attorney, Wash- 
ington, D. C., who will furnish complete copies of 
patents at the rate of 10 cents each.] 


Issued Jan. eg, 1884. 

1:92,479. EYEGLASSES. Ivan Fox, Philadel- 
phia, Pa. 

292,517. COMBINED COLLAR-STUD AND 
CRAVAT - HOLDER. E. S. Strait, Troy, 
N. Y. 

292,615. ORNAMENTAL CHAIN. Walter 
Ballou, North Attleboro, Mass. 

292,676. JEWELING - TOOL. J. R. Parsons, 
La Porte, Ind. 

292.729. BUTTON. Ernest Wuerfel, Brook- 
lyn, N. Y. 

292,76.-5. COMBINED LETTER-SCALE AND 
COIN-TESTER. F. C. Purmelle, Seneca, 
Kan. 

j Design issued Jan. 30, lSg4, for seven years. 

2.T,020. SPOON HANDLE. A. F. Jackson, 
Taunton, Mass., assignor to the Reed & 
Barton Corporation, same place. 

I Designs issued July ey, i 8 gy, for 3^2 years. 

j 27,421. WATCH - CHARM.' Samuel Stophlet, 
Kansas City, Mo. 

27,422. GIRDLE. W. H. Starr, Decatur, 111. 


\V. A. Brastield, Carrington, Tenn., ex- 
pects to sell out his jewelry business and 
go to California. This is made necessary 
on account of Mr. Brasfield’s failing 
health. 




Old new VorR Cower Ciitiepleces. 


TOWEH CLOCKS THAT HAVE MARKED TIME FOR UP- 
WARDS OF A HALF CENTURY AND MORE. 


T he cost of a timekeeper to-day is so 
small that even the poorest citizen 
can afford to carry one, but there was a 
time when pocket timepieces were ex- 



BRICK CHURCH CROCK. 


pensive, and the town clock was almost a 
necessary luxury. The divisions of day 
marked by the clanging strokes of these 
public tower clocks were heeded by nearly 
all, and work was begun and left off ac- 
cording to the time called by these an- 
cient recorders. Scattered throughout the 
older portions of the city these old tower 
clocks stand to-day as distinct reminders 
of the early days of our Dutch and Eng- 
lish ancestors when New York was little 
more than a thriving but promising town 
of the new world. 

Down at old Trinity people watch the 
ticking of the huge clock in the stone 
tower and listen eagerly to the hour, 
half-hour and quarter-hour strokes of its 
musical gong; but while Trinity has 
the largest and one of the best clocks 
in the city, it is not by any means the 


oldest. It was built in 1846 by Janies 
Rogers, and with but slight interruption 
for occasional repairs the clock has been 
ticking away the time for over half a 
century. The clock has the reputation of 
being one of the best timepieces .in Amer- 
ica and it is certainly the heaviest. The 
weights of this clock are from 800 to l,50t) 
pounds, and the huge pendulum is 18 feet 
long. The interior mechanism of the clock 
is all on a large and rather clumsy scale, 
for the wheels, pinions and cranks take up 
nearly the whole inside space of the large 
tower, and the friction is so great th.it 
constant oiling and care have been neces- 
sary all along to keep the clock in good 
working order. The main wheels of the 
clock are 30 inches in diameter, and the 
frame in which the clock is built is 9 feet 
long and 5 feet high. Rogers had the 
reputation of building excellent tower 
clocks, but in the case of old Trinity he 
made the mistake of building on too large 
a scale. The heavy 1,500 pound weight 
has a drop of 50 feet, and in the event of a 
break in the cord the fall of the weight 
might prove a serious matter to the frame- 
work of the floor of the tower. To pro- 
vide against any such contingency a huge 
box has been built in the bottom of the 
well, and nearly a bale of cotton is kept 
there at all times to break the fall of one 
of the big weights. 

Much more important from an his- 
torical point of view than Trinity’s clock 
is the ancient timepiece in the tower of 
St. Paul’s Church. This is not by any 



CITY HARR CROCK. 


means such a handsome and conspicuous 
tower clock as Trinity’s, for the frame is 
only 5 feet high and a little over 2 feet 
wide and four feet deep. Old St. Paul’s 
Church was erected in 1766, but the clock 
was not put up until nearly 40 years later. 
The inscription on the inside bears date 
of 1798, and the words “made by John 


Thwaites, Clerkenwell, Loud.” Even this 
date makes the clock more than a cen- 
tury old, and the fact that it keeps ex- 
cellent time to-day is good evidence that 
its builder performed his work satisfac- 
torily. Few clocks built to-day could be 
warranted to stand the storms and weather 
of a full century, and in all that time lose 


-'•S'- 



ST. PAUR’S CHURCH CROCK. 


only a few hours. The pendulum of this 
clock is 13 feet in length and is made of 
wood and makes 32 beats. The ball weight 
is only 75 pounds, but the main wheels 
are from 24 to 27 inches in diameter. 

Many of the old tower clocks have such 
heavy weights that the free movement of 
the mechanism has been greatly hampered, 
and this is especially true of the old clock 
in St. John’s. The weight is a solid cast- 
ing and so heavy that several times the 
proposition to replace it by a lighter one 
has been discussed. The pendulum is a 
short one, measuring only 7J feet, and this 
in connection with the heavy weight 
causes such serious blows when the pen- 
dulum swings that the whole clock is 
shaken. Owing to this clumsy movement 
nearly every tooth in the scape wheel has 
been broken at one time or another, and 


8G 


THE HOROLOGICAL REVIEW. 


February 6, 1901. 


yet the clock has kept excellent time and j 
continues to measure the hours of day and 
night with wonderful regularity. Thi« ' 
clock is verj’ similar to the one in its ^ 
sister church of St. Paul’s, but it is not 
nearly so ancient or antiquated in con- 
struction. 

Probably the oldest tower clock in 
N e w York 
is in the old 
St. George’s 
Episcopal 
Church, cor- 
ner of 16th St. 
and Second 
A V e. The 
exact age of 
the clock is 
not known, 
and all that 
can be gath- 
ered of its 
ancient line- 
age is that it 
was built by 
Simeon \\'il- 
lard, of Rox- 
bury, iNIass., 
and that it 
w a s origin- 
ally put in 
the tower of 
the old St. 
George’s 
Church at 
the corner of 
Beekman and 
Cliff Sts. 

ST. mark’s CHURCH CLOCK. This church 

was b u il t 

in 175'2, and stood there for upward of a 
century. The present church on 16th 
St. was the legitimate successor to the 
downtown structure. The present church 
is the second building on the site now oc- 
cupied by it. The first was burned in 
1814, and the second was built in the 
following year. The clock was supposed 
to be half a century old prior to this 
time, which would give it an age of nearly 
150 years. Hoary though it is with age, 
the clock continues to tick regularly and 
mark the time of day exactly. Half a 
century ago St. George’s time regulated 
the city’s movements, and clocks and 
watches were practically set by it. It 
varied so little in its time that it was gen- 
erally recognized as the city’s standard 
timepiece. Even to-day its movements are 
regular, and it rarely gains or loses in the 
course of a day or week. The clock is 
small compared with some of the other 
tower clocks in the city, and the frame is 
only 5 feet long. The pendulum is a rod. 

5 feet in length, holding an iron ball at 
its bottom weighing 50 pounds. The regu- 
larity with which this pendulum swings 
back and forth, ticking away the years of 
a new centur>’, impresses one more than 
the modern clocks with their fine, finished 
mechanism. Nearly all the works of these 
old tower clocks were made by hand, the 
wheels, pendulums and gearings all being 
forged out by some expert handicraftsman 
who understood his business well. 

At Second Ave. and 10th St. stands 
one of the interesting structures of an- 
cient times, and for years it stood as a 
solitary structure “up in the country north 
of New York.” Beneath its floors the re- 



mains of old Peter Stuyvesant, the last 
Dutch Governor of New York, are buried. ! 
On this site the doughty old Governor 
built a chapel for the Dutch farmers who 
had farms north of the city. The present 



ST. JOHN’S CHURCH CLOCK. 

church was built in 1826, when the old 
chapel was hoary with age, and even at 
that time the country around was devoted 
to farming. The Dutch from Harlem came 
down to this church to worship, and the 
people from the Long Island shore also 
crossed the river to attend the meetings 
there. In this old church building there 
is a tower clock that was put up shortly 
after the structure was erected, and it is 
in many respects an exact duplicate or 
copy of the tower clock in St. John’s. It 
in smaller, but otherwise very similar. 



The old Dutch Reformed Church at 
Fifth Ave. and 29th St. has an an- 
cient clock, copied also after the one in 
St. John’s Church, and its origin dates 
back to the early part of the present cen- 


tury. This clock was built by Stokell, who 
was in his days one of the best manufac- 
turers of timepieces in the country. The 
present Dutch Church was a successor to 
the old wooden building erected at one 
time on what is now called Old Slip. 
There wa» a clock in this first wood- 
en structure, but it must have dis- 
appeared 
when the 
building was 
d e m olished. 

The present 
one was con- 
s t r ucted 
shortly after 
the erection 
of the church 
building a t 
29th St. 

There are 
many more 
modern tow- 
er clocks in 
the city, but 
most of them 
have been 
built within 
the last qua’"- 
ter of a cen- 
t u r y. The 
Brick Church 
and others 
have good 
clocks. The 
City Hall 
clock is also 
a n excellent 
one and of old dutch church clock. 
con siderable 

size. The one on the old Third Ave. 
R. R. depot is a large and hand- 
some timepiece. But none of these 
has the historical interest of those 
that have ticked upwards of half a 
centurj' and more in the few re- 
maining old churches of the city. 

They gather new interest and as- 
sociation as time passes, and as they con- 
tinue to keep good time as in their youth- 
ful days they testify to the excellent work- 
manship of the early clockmakers. 


Uses of Diamond Tweezers. 


4 4 »J^EBSTER defines tweezers as ‘a 
» » small pincers, used to pluck out 
hairs and for other purposes,’ ” said an old 
jeweler to a Jewelers’ Circular-Weekly 
reporter recently, “but many more pur- 
poses are served by the more specific dia- 
mond tweezers, a requisite in every jew- 
eler’s kit. 

“My own I always carry in my breast- 
pocket, and after using, replace it forth- 
with. Why? Because otherwise my fel- 
low jeweler with whom I may be nego- 
tiating and who has acquired the same 
habit, may pick it up, place it in his own 
pocket and incur the trouble of sending it 
to me. Now, this one,” displaying a fine 
nickel plated tweezers, “has my name 
etched upon it for just such contingency. 
The man who neglects this precaution has 
an occasionally busy time hunting for his 
lost tweezers; he may find it, in the great 
hereafter, where the organist ‘seated one 
day at the organ’ surmises he may find 
his ‘lost chord.’ Eh! in heaven? cer- 




February 6, 1901. 


THE JEWELERS’ CIRCULAR-WEEKLY. 


tainly. The finder will be there too. 
Neither of them would violate the com- 
mandment ‘Thou shalt not steal.’ It is 
merely the force of habit. 

”.\nd speaking of habit, do you know, 
a jeweler will spend in time, searching for 
it, manifold a tweezer’s cost rather than 
not recover one to which he has become 
accustomed by prolonged and frequent 
use! He ‘has the hang of it’ — has become 
attached to it. 

“But aside from its professional utility, 
I imagine every jeweler who carries one 
knows how handy it is otherwise. -Read- 
ing an uncut book away from one’s own 
library conveniences, the flat end serves 
as a paper cutter. A neighbor in a street 
car has dropped a silver coin between the 
slats of the wood floor mat. The coin is 
too elusive for clumsy fingers to rescue; 
he calls the conductor, reluctant to lift the 
four-feet square structure, to the possible 
discomfort of six or eight passengers. 
With my ready tweezers I extricate the 
coin, present it to the loser, receive a 
smiling acknowledgment and witness a 
grateful expression on the faces of the pas- 
sengers who have not been disturbed. 

“It will remove superfluous hairs, as 
Webster says of ordinary tweezers; but 
run a splinter into your finger and it will 


pull it out; it will deftly pick out any 
small object from a mass of them. Drop 
your eye glasses in your soup plate, and 
before the laugh is fairly on you they are 
rescued without soiling your fingers. No 
sugar tongs on the table? Wipe your 
tweezer prongs on your napkin, transfer 
the stipulated number of lumps to your 
coffee cup and the laugh is on the hostess. 
Want to tie a twine knot for which the 
fingers are ' too bulky? Seize the twine 
with your tweezers and it’s done in a 
twinkle. Out fishing and break your line 
on the big fish you didn’t get? Nothing 
can be so readily used to short-splice your 
line as tweezers; with its prongs in con- 
tact it separates the strands as would a 
delicate bodkin, and the splicing ends are 
seized and pulled through by their grip. 
I have made such splices in eight minutes 
each. No, I fear I cannot recommend a 
tweezers nor any other instrument for 
rescuing the big fishes that are lost. 

“Do you want to protract your enjoy- 
ment of an extra fine cigar? Hold it in 
your tweezers when its brevity would 
otherwise scorch your finger. 

“Harry — oh, never mind his other 
name — was on his Summer vacation in 
Sullivan County, N. Y., some years ago. 
One morning, gathereo vvith others on 

' 


the hotel piazza, he noticed a young lady 
who seemed distressed by some throat ob- 
struction which she sought to remove by 
futile swallowing and spasmodic coughing 
which afforded no relief. She had thus 
suffered for several hours. Harry sympa- 
thetically asked leave to seek the cause of 
the irritation; she acquiesced. He ob- 
served what seemed to be a fine fish-bone, 
one end penetrating the thick of the pal- 
ate, the other end sticking into the ad- 
joining tissue and held by both ends, -bent 
as an archer’s bow. Cautioning her to 
sit quietly he carefully directed -his dia- 
mond tweezers to it, gripped it midway 
and withdrew it, presenting it to her gaze 
as the triumph of a jeweler’s tweezers. 
Harry was dubbed ‘Doctor’ during the 
remainder of his stay. No, he didn’t 
marry her; his wife held her head whilst 
Harry performed the delicate opera- 
tion.” 

“Verily a diamond tweezers is a con- 
venient instrument for much more than 
its nominal purpose in the hands of an 
ingenious jeweler,” concluded the reporter, 
and the old jeweler responded as -de- 
murely as a proposition under the mathe- 
matical rule-of-three: 

“Hair-pin : Woman : : Diamond tweez- 
ers : Jeweler.” 





at 


Drop 


DROP PRESSES 


PLAIN AND AUTOMATIC. 

What the Jewelers and Silver- 
smiths need for the coming 
season. Plain Drops for work 
that has to be daped. Auto- 
matics for Flat Back and 
Shallow work. 


POWER PRESSES, 
ROLLING NULLS, 

WITH ROLLER BEARINGS, 

WIRE DRAWING 
MACniNERY. 






MossbergandGranvilleMfg.Co. 

150 Nassau Street, 
NE.W YOP^K. 


Drop 







ss 


THE JEWELERS’ CIRCULAR-WEEKLY. 


February 6, 1901. 


OUR OPTICAL DEPARTMENT 

is most complete in every particular and we wish to im= 
press upon you the fact that we are in every way just as 
capable of handling your Optical business as if we devoted 
our entire time to this branch. We fill Optical prescriptions 
of all Kinds, the most difficult as well as the simplest, and 
we absolutely guarantee their correctness. We do it as 
cheaply and as quickly as anyone. Thus you can order 
your Jewelry, Tools and Material and Optical goods from 
the same house, which is a great convenience. 

We also carry a full line of Cameras and Camera sup= 
plies at best prices and will fill orders from any list 
you may have. 


B. A. 6 Co. Gold=Filled Spectacle Frames. 

We positively guarantee the B. A. 6 Co. Gold=Filled Spectacle Frames to give entire 
satisfaction and will cheerfully replace any such frame that fails to do so. Fach one 
carries a tag bearing our guarantee (see fac=simile cut) and the letter “A” is stamped 
in every bridge to serve as a means of identification. We can furnish these frames 
in all sizes of eye. 



B. A. <5 CO. GOLD=FILLED FRAMES. 

No. 100 Riding Bow Spectacle Frames, = = = per doz., $6.00. 

No. 101 Straight Temple “ “ = = = “ “ 7.00. 

No. 102 Cable .... .. = = = “ “ 9.00. 

6 Per Cent. Discount for Cash. 

For other Optical goods of all descriptions, see our 1901 Catalogue, pages 669 to 749. 

BENJ. ALLEN 6 CO., 

WHOLESALE JEWELERS AND OPTICIANS, 

131 = 137 WABASH AVE., CHICAGO. 






CONDUCTED B f GEORGE A. ROGERS. 


32d Year. WEDNESDAY, FEBRUARY 6, 1901. Vol. XLII. No. 1. 


NOTE — U7ider this d»>partme7it^ all matters of a 
technical or a news character tearing upon the 
optical branch of the jewelry industry will be con- 
sidered. Address communications to The Jewelers' 
Circular Fub, Co.^ // John St.y New York. 


SALUTATORY. 


I N taking charge of the Optica] Depart- 
^ ment of The Jewelers’ Circular- 
Weekly the writer is not fully acquainted 
with the past work of the paper in this 
field. Perhaps this is not of so much con- 
sequence to readers as what it is pro;:osed 
that the department shall be in the future. 
In this regard I find myself reluctant to 
throw out any glittering promises or 
arouse hopes that may not be realized. 
That we purpose making it the most effec- 
tive of optical departments needs no affirm- 
ation, but our success in that particular 
must be judged by the reader. 

In amplifying this department the pub- 
lishers are but recognizing an established 
alliance between the jewelry and optical 
trades. This alliance is not new, and nat- 
ural evolution seems to be strengthening 
rather than weakening it, notwithstanding 
the fact that there probably is something 
anomalous in the union. The bridge that 
joins the craft of the jeweler and the pro- 
fession of the optician is the dual charac- 
ter of the optical business, which is, in cer- 
tain respects, a craft, or art, and in other 
respects a learned profession. The optical 
business — that is, its professional practice 
— lends dignity to the jewelry craft, if la- 
bor can be said to be more dignified in 
one field than in another. To be a skilled 
refracting optician requires qualities of 
mind somewhat different from those re- 
quired of a skilled mechanic, but it is, per- 
haps, not altogether proper to regard one 
as superior to the other. 

As to the profession of optics or optom- 
etry this is of itself dual in character. As 
a means of adjusting the actioft of the eye 
to the average work required of it in the 
ordinary affairs of life, so that it may do 
this work easily and with the least fatigue, 
and also that Its dynamic functions may 
have due exercise by being put to normal 
uses, thus establishing the principle of 
work and rest, that is the highest class of 
work the optician is called upon to per- 
form. But it was discovered quite early 
that the proper correction of the eyes 
with lenses had an important relation to 
the general health of a great number of 
people, and of late years the medical pro- 
fession, or that portion of it making a 


specialty of the eye, has devoted a great 
deal of attention to optics, and the oculist 
who does not at least assume to be profi- 
cient in this work is rare. Defects of the 
eyes often disturb the balance of the entire 
nervous system and reflex troubles are de- 
veloped in remote organs because of the 
nervous relation, for the different organs 
of the body are not unlike the great and 
smaller cities of State, wh'ch are connected 
by telegraphic and transportation lines 
that make their business relations very in- 
timate. And conversely, the derangement 
of a remote organ of the body may disturb 
the normal functional action of the eyes. 
To ignore this relationship is to disregard 
the most undeniable of facts. 

But optometry cannot be said to be a 
branch of medicine, although the eye is 
connected with the general health of many, 
if not all, human beings. There are few 
things that are not so connected with the 
general health. To that extent in which 
physicians practice optometry they are re- 
fracting opticians rather than opticians in- 
fringing upon the legitimate field of the 
physician. Unfortunately, also, for the 
physician, he is too often a poor optician, 
and because he is so he affects to despise 
this branch of learning. This is naturally 
the case, for they are usually self-taught, 
and must be to attain any proficiency in 
the art, unless, without regard to their 
professional dignity, which some are sen- 
sible enough to disregard, they take a 
course of instruction and training in a real 
optical or optometric school, which, as a 
rule, they also affect to despise, and which, 
from the standpoint of professional ethics, 
is indeed a despicable institution. The re- 
fracting optician is trained in one of these 
schools and he is the only real professional 
in optometric work. The physician who, 
with contempt for the^e schools and con- 
tempt for optical knowledge generally, un- 
dertakes to do optometric work, is invari- 
ably a blunderer, deserving of the confi- 
dence and patronage of no one, for he is 
not qualified to prescribe lenses for any 
living human being. 

The jeweler optician is, of course, no 
better, if he be without special training. 
This is not to say that attendance at an 
optical college is always necessary for 
either, but without such training years 
must be spent and thousands of blunders 
be made before anyone can arrive at what 
may be called a “professional” degree of 
skill. There is nothing in the course of 
the medical schools — general or special — 

I to impart this intimate knowledge and 


give the required practical training. 
It is to the growing class of professional 
opticians that this department will be de- 
voted. We have great interest in every 
class of men or women who are inoculated 
with the real professional spirit that op- 
tometry, and the beautiful phenomena of 
optics and the mathematical principles that 
govern them, raises in the breasts of all 
who begin its study. We hope also to 
make this department interesting, inspir- 
ing and useful to them. How successfully 
(or unsuccessfully) the editor may set the 
varied menu of current optical news and 
literature before readers of this depart- 
ment — that is a question we leave to our 
optical readers. 

Respectfully yours. 

George A. Rogers. 


NOTATION OF CURVATURE. 


'^HE optician, or prospective optician, 

I who desires to get the greatest 
advantage from the reading or study ol 
original articles in this department, should 
familiarize himself with the notation ol 
curvature given here. 

DEFINITIONS. 

By the. term “curvature” we have refer- 
ence to the degree of curvature rather than 
to its extent; and while the notation may 
be applied to curved lines or surfaces, 
whether their curvature is uniform or not, 
it will only be necessary for the present 
to consider uniform curvatures. 

Spherical surfaces have uniform curva- 
ture in all meridians — that is, their curva- 
ture is that of any great circle of the 
sphere or of its circumference. Small 
circles of a sphere have a uniform curva- 
ture, but their curvature is not the curva- 
ture of the sphere. Cylindrical surfaces 
have a uniform curvature in the meridian 
at right angles to the axis, but in no other 
meridian, one of which, the axial meridian, 
has no curvature. 

PRINCIPLES. 

1. The degree of curvature in a line or 
surface depends upon its nearness to the 
center; the nearer it is to the center the 
greater its curvature. 

2. Curvatiwe is inversely proportional 
to the distance of the curved line or sur- 
face from the center of curvature. 

3. At a center of curvature, curvature 
may be said to be infinite ( Co); at an in- 
finite distance from the center, curva- 
ture may be said to be zero (o). 


00 


THE JEWELERS’ CIRCULAR-WEEKLY. 


February 6, 1901. 


Optical Department. 

yContinut'd from fage Sq.] 

4. Curvature is static if unchanging, as 
the curvature in the surface of a lens; 
dynamic if constantly undergoing modifi- 
cation, as the curvature of waves of light. 

5. Curvatures that are convex may be 
called positive or plus (-j-), and those that 
are concave may be called negative or 
minus ( — ). 

6. But convexity and concavity are 
really but relative terms, since whether 
they be convex or concave depends upon 
the point of view. 

UNIT OF CURV.\TURE. 

The unit of curvature is that degree of 
curvature in a line or surface which has 
a radius of curvature of one meter. It 
may be called simply 1, 1 curvature, or 
1C. If convex, it is +1C., if concave, 
— 1C. Then, according to principle 2 

above, the curvature of a line or surface 
having a radius of curv-ature of J meter 
is 2C., of i meter, 4C., of 3-5 meter, 5-3 
1 2-3C. Whatever part the radius is of a 
meter the inverse of that quantity is the 
curvature; and vice-versa, whatever the 
curvature the radius of curvature in 
meters is the inverse of that quantity. A 
curvature of 5C. means a radius of 1-5 
meter; of 20C. means a radius of 1-20 
meter, etc. (See Fig. 1.) 

%,/ 



notation of CURVATURE. 

To those who are accustomed to work 
in inches it is only necessary to bear in 
mind that 1 meter is equal to about 40 in. 
Then, 1-5 meter equals 1-5 of 40 in. = 8 
in., and an 8 in radius, since it is equal 
to 1-5 meter, means a curvature of 5C. 
On the same basis a 5 in. radius means 8C., 
and 20 in. = 2C., etc. To reduce a radius 
in inches to curvature divide 40 by the 
number of inches instead of 1 by the num- 
ber of meters. If we represent curvature 
by the letter C, and radius by the letter 
R, the following formulae will apply: 

1. By the metric system: 

C X f? = 1 

1 C = 7? 

1 R = C 

2. By the inch system: 

C X R = iO 

4(1 C = i? 

40 ^ R — C 


APPLIED TO LENSES. 

It will be seen by the above that a lens 
having one surface spherical, and such 
surface having a radius of 'curvature of 
1-5 meter (8 in.) will have 5C. in such 
surface. If the surface is convex its curva- 
ture is +5C., if concave, — 5C. If the 
opposite surface has a spherical curvature, 
radius 1-8 meter (5 in.) its curvature is 
8C. If convex, its curvature is +8C., if 


concave, — 8C. If both surfaces are con- 
vex the total curvature of the (Fig. 2) lens 
is -f-13C., if both are concave its total 
curvature is — 13C. If one surface is -|-8C. 
and the other is — 5C., its total, or rather 
its composite curvature is -f-3C., and if one 
surface is ■ — 8C. and the other is +5C., its 
composite curvature is — 3C. The curva- 
ture in glass lenses is static, since it is 
fixed in the making and stationary. 

Cylinders have uniform curvature in one 
meridian, the meridian at right angles to 


r/g 2 



SURF.ACE CURVATURE OF A LENS 

the axis. The curvature of a cylinder is 
designated by the curvature of the meri- 
dian of uniform curvature. If a lens has 
a cylindrical surface on one side of -|-3C. 
and a spherical surface on the other side 
of -j-2C., the meridian of uniform and 
maximum curvature has a curvature of 
-|-5C., the sum of the curvatures of sphere 
and cylinder, and the meridian of uniform 
but minimum curvature has a curvature of 
-J-2C., the curvature of the sphere only. 
These are called the principal meridians. 
No other meridian has uniform curva- 
ture. 

By the curvature of lenses their dioptric 
power is determined, but curvature is but 
one factor in dioptric power or action. 
Toric lenses are lenses in which one sur- 
face has a toric curvature — the equivalent 
of compounding a sphere and cylinder. 

APPLIED TO LIGHT WAVES. 

Waves of light are generated at or 
emanate from points, traversing space in 
a homogeneous medium at equal speed in 
all directions. They are, therefore, spheri- 
cal in curvature. The same notation of 
curvature applies to them. At the point 
of generation or emanation their curva- 
ture is infinite. It becomes zero at infinity. 
All waves of light are naturally (unmodi- 
fied) convex, but spherical lenses through 
which they pass and spherical mirrors 
that reflect them change their curvature 
in many ways and degrees. It is by such 
action they become concave. Their 
sphericity is slightly disturbed by such 
action, but this disturbance is, in dioptrics. 



SHOWING CURVATURE OF WAVES OF LIGHT 
AT DIFFERENT DISTANCES FROM 
POINT OF ORIGIN. 


considered a negligible quantity, since it 
is very slight. 

Convex or positive waves are those pro- 
ceeding away from their point of genera- 
tion or emanation, which is the original 
center of curvature for them. All waves 
are naturally of this kind. Concave or 
negative waves are those proceeding 
toward their center of curvature, which is 
an actual or potential focus. If waves are 
neither convex nor concave they are called 


neutral or plane. The curvature of light 
waves, except the neutrals, is dynamic, for 
it is always changing by the mere propa- 
gation of the waves in space, since by such 
propagation they are necessarily either ap- 
proaching or receding from their center. 
The action of a spherical lens or mirror 
may increase, decrease or neutralize or re- 
verse curvature at the surface of action. 
What it ia able to do in this respect depends 
upon its power, but the action of a lens sur- 
face is not fixed by its curvature, but de- 
pends also upon the curvature of the waves 
upon which it acts. 

Waves one meter from the object and 
unmodified are -)-lC. in curvature, or -j-lC. 
At i meter their curvature is -f-2C., 
at 1-5 meter +5C., etc. At a distance of 
t) meters their (Fig. 3) curvature +1-(>C., 
and this is so slight an amount for 
waves entering a lens or the pupil of 
the eye that it is regarded as zero. When 
a wave of light is modified in curvature 
by the action of a lens or mirror its 
changed curvature places the center at 
some other point. It may be nearer to or 
farther from the wave. It may be at an 
infinite distance from it. It may be upon 
the opposite side of the wave; as when the 
wave is reversed. We are always able to 
locate the new position exactly and de- 
termine the precise effect. 

It is not our purpose here to consider 
these effects of lenses and mirrors upon 
the fast fleeing waves of light, but by such 
modifications all of the beautiful phenom- 
ena of optics are produced. The notation 
of curvature enables us to make a simple 
analysis of all optical effects, one not com- 
plex and algebraic, such as the books are 
loaded down with, but that every day op- 
tical students can easily grasp. The phe- 
nomena and the laws that govern them 
can be made as simple as the phenomena 
themselves, and nature is simple in all' her 
ways if we but apply a simple system of 
expressing the work done. 


Legislation and Legal Defence Fund. 


Paper read at Milwaukee before the Wisconsin State 
Optical Society by Mrs. Alva Snider., of Beloit^ H'is. 


T he first and most important question 
to be considered is. would we better 
or worse our 
cause by try- 
ing to legis- 
late at this 
time? It 
seems to me 
that with 
from 10 to 
15 physicians 
in ^ V e r y 
small town 
and from 
one to three 
opticians, and 
the cities ac- 
c o r d i n gly, 
it would 
be but utter 
failure. You 
aW know the 

outcome of the attempts on the part of 
other societies to legislate. But suppose 
we did succeed in getting a bill passed to 
have an examining board, do you imagine 
the board would consist of optician.^? No, 


MRS. ALVA SNIDER. 



February 6, 1901. 


THE JEWELERS’ CIRCULAR-WEEKLY. 


91 



Geneva Adjustable 
Table No, 991. 

We here illustrate for the first 
time the Geneva Adjustable 
Table. We consider this the 
finest table on the market. It 
is constructed so as to practi- 
cally balance either ophthal- 
mometer or retinoscope. It 
has rack and pinion adjust- 
ment, assisted and balanced 
by a coil spring. When at 
proper height it is made abso- 
lutely rigid by a set screw. 

Price, .... $10.00 EACH. 


BIG RED TJCTTION. 

Gervais Gh 


■’ J^'HIS CHART is one that should be in the office of 
every oculist and optician. The figures are on a 
black background and are done in seven colors, and are 
perfect representations of the different parts of the 
eye. These charts have always been sold at $i. 25 each, 
owing to the fact that they had to be imported. 

We are pleased to announce that we are prepared to 
supply this elegant chart at the following extremely 
low price, as we have finally succeeded in getting a 
stone made and having charts printed in this country, 
thus saving for our customers the high duty on them. 

ON PAPER 27x35 INCHES. Each 25 Cents. 


The cost of sending these separately by prepaid e.xpress is 15 cents each. 


GENEVA OPTICAL COMPANY, i 

Branch Office at Des Moines, lozva. 6} and 65 WASHINGTON ST., CHICAGO, ILLINOIS. 




92 


THE JEWELERS’ CIRCULAR-WEEKLY. 


February 6, 1901, 


Optical Department. 

\Ccntifiued yrovi oo. 


indeed! \\'e would do well if we had one 
or two men on; the rest would be M.D.’s, 
as of course it would be in the Governor’s 
hand to appoint them, and the doctors 
represent a strong political body when 
they choose to combine: and I want to 
ask you gentlemen whether a politician 
would favor the stronger or weaker party. 
Why. the stronger of course. Not only 
that, but, knowing little or nothing of 
either profession, would probably think 
the M.D.'s were the most capable (?) to 
do the work on this board. Then who is 
this board going to examine? Why, it is 
going to examine you. You say, that is 
all right, I am ready to be examined. Of 
course you are. But are you ready to pass 
an examination put up partially or wholly 
by the doctors who are prejudiced against 
the opticians, while the oculist who needs 
it much more and who is a self-appointed 
medical eye specialist, neither legally nor 
scientifically qualified to fit glasses by any 
other than the medical degree, goes scot 
free? Dr. Edward Jackson says: “It 

must be confessed that in former years 
the medical schools have sadly slighted 
and ignored training in this department of 
medical science; and even with the great 
improvement of the curriculum that has 
taken place there is still too much cause 
for reproach in this respect. 

“Up to about 20 years ago practically 
no teaching of ophthalmology was offered 
in many of our colleges. Even the pro- 
fessor of surgery, who taught the whole 
subject in two lectures, often allowed 
these lectures to be crowded out to make 
room for what he deemed more necessary 
matter, and since professorships of oph- 
thalmology have been established, so long 
as examinations in this branch were not 
a requirement for graduation and no em- 
phasis was laid on its importance, the 
teaching w'as neglected and the mass of 
medical graduates went out almost as ig- 
norant of its important facts as before." 

According to statistics gathered from 
professors and graduates of the different 
colleges this condition still exists. A pro- 
fessor and tw'o graduates of Yale Medical 
Department said: “We have only six 

hours on the subject of optometry.” A 
Harvard graduate said it is the same at 
that college. graduate of the Uni- 
versity of Pennsylvania, also one from Jef- 
son Medical College of Philadelphia, said 
from four to six hours. One gentleman 
said: “The j'ear I attended Physicians’ 
and Surgeons’ of New York we had only 
one hour on optics.” Michigan, Ohio, 
Vermont and Illinois are said to give no 
more time to this important subject. 
Within three days one M.D. said: “Most 
colleges do not give the subject a minute.’’ 
And these are the men who will examine 
us if we have a State examining board 
before we are able to demand that it be 
composed of graduates of reliable optical 
colleges. 

Mr. Huxley, a man who knew the cost 
of victory, in writing to Professor Lancas- 
ter on the vice and virtues of combative- 
ness, said: “I wdsh you would let an old 
man who has had his share of fighting re- 
mind you that battles, like hypotheses, are 
not to be multiplied beyond necessity.” 


That, I think, should be our policy with 
the doctors. 

Don't multiply your fights, but try to 
lessen them, and this can be done only 
along intellectual lines. Prove that you 
are their optical superiors and you cannot 
help winning. Work to strengthen your 
society. Have a legal defense fund and, 
if possible, have a member who is located 
in or near Madison, to watch the legisla- 
tion and see to it that the doctors pass 
no bill detrimental to your interest as op- 
ticians, but try to do nothing with legis- 
lating until we are strong enough to at 
least have hope of gaining something. 
Defeat would place us in a worse position 
than we are now in. 

The president, at our last July meeting, 
requested us to be prepared to discuss at 
this January meeting the legal defense 
fund. First, how much money shall we 
have? How shall it be raised and how 
shall it be cared for? It should be limited 
to $500, but we should have that much I 
think, as it takes $250 to carry a case 
through the lower and Supreme Courts 
without your lawyer’s fee. And the Su- 
preme Court asks a bond of $250 before 
your case is begun. Now, I think all 
money in the treasury after all bills of the 
society are paid should go to the defense 
fund. For instance, we all pay our annual 
dues this January. Of course we cannot 
put it in now, as we do not know what our 
expenses will be for the coming year; but 
one year from now all surplus moneys left 
from this assessment should be turned over 
to the legal defense fund. Besides this, 
each member should be assessed one dol- 
lar a year, payable at July meetings, until 
we have $500 in the treasury. This fund 
should be cared for by the treasurer, he to 
be under surety bond, the cost of said 
bond to be paid by the society. He should 
also be empowered to loan this money, 
but it must be placed where it can be 
called in on very short notice. The inter- 
est accruing thereon should go to the gen- 
eral fund of this society. The defense 
fund should be used to secure legal advice 
whenever the board of directors deem it 
necessary and should be subject to order 
of said board, this board to meet when- 
ever the president directs or on petition 
of 15 active members. Any member in good 
standing severing his connection with the 
society should have all moneys paid into 
the defense fund by him returned, except 
that which may have been expended in 
the interest of the society, due notice be- 
ing given, and provided there be no liti- 
gation pending. 

The next question is, whom shall we de- 
fend? Shall it be the optician who uses 
the degree doctor, or shall it be the opti- 
cian who uses cycloplegics. or shall it be 
the peddler? I refrain from expressing 
any opinion on these questions, but leave 
them open for discussion. The medical 
fraternity always has and always will fight 
the legal recognition of the opticians to the 
bitter end. Such a fight will entail great 
expense of time and money. Therefore, 
we should be well equipped before enter- 
ing the conflict. 

L. Levitt, of the Levitt Optical Co., To- 
ledo, O., has opened a permanent branch 
office on S. Main St., Bellefontaine, O. 

Weld I. Smith. Easthampton, will spend 
three months in Walt'- am. Mass., studying 
the construction of watches. 


Encyclopedia-Dictionary 

and 

Reference Handbook of the Ophthalmic 
Sciences. 

CopSTrighted 1898, by The Jewelers’ Circular Pub. Co. 

By R. H. Knowles, M.D. 

{Commenced in issue o/ July 6, iSqS. - Continued from 
Jage 7S- /««■ 23. r<PO/.l 
Part LXIX. 

l*leuroi>lc5>'ia {ple/ii-ro-ple'-gi-a). [Greek, 
pleura = one side -p plege — a stroke.) A 
want of equal movements on the part of the 
muscles controlling the movements of the 
extra-ocular muscles. 

I* 11 e u mo pli til ill III os {pneu-moph-thaV - 
mos). [Greek, pneuma = the air -p oph- 
thalmos — the eye.] A pathological con- 
dition in which there is a collection of air 
within the eyeball. 

Point {point). [Middle English, point = 
sharp end.] The Eye Point of the micro- 
scope is a circle of light formed by the rays 
of light crossing. The Far or Distance Point 
is placed for practical purposes at twenty 
feet away for an emmetropic eye. A 
hyperopic eye is really beyond that point 
and in a myopic eye the far point is less 
than twenty feet. The Fixation Point is 
that point for any dioptric condition at 
which an object can be distinctly seen. 
The Focal Point is the point at which the 
rays of light meet. There are two focal 
points — an anterior and a posterior. The 
anterior focal point is formed by a myopic 
eye and the rays of light. The posterior 
focal point is formed by an emmetropic eye. 
The Point of Incidence is the surface upon 
which the rays of light enter. The Near 
Point is the nearest accommodative point at 
which a patient can read. The Absolute 
Near Point is the nearest accommodative 
point in which one eye can see distinctly. 
The Binocular Near Point is the one in which 
the functions, convergence and accommo- 
dation, are so nicely balanced that a single 
object can be seen perfectly. The Nodal 
Point is that point to which all the rays of 
light come after passing through a lens. The 
posterior pole of the crystalline lens is its 
nodal point. The Principal Points are the 
points in the line of the axis of a lens which 
pass in parallel paths from the object to the 
image. The Point of Refraction is the point 
where the line is bent in passing from a rare 
to a denser medium. The Corresponding or 
Identical Retinal Point is the same point in 
space projected by both eyes after both 
retinas have received the same impression. 
The Desparate Retinal Point is formed by 
two different points in space after two 
different retinal impressions have been re- 
ceived by both eyes. The Point of Sight 
or vision is the point of observation or place 
from which an object is seen. 

Polariiiieter {po-lar-im' et-er). [Latin, 
polus — a pole -f Greek, metron = a 
measure.) An instrument which will change 
the polarizing plane from the right to the 
left side. 

Polariiiietry {po-livr-im -et-ry). [Latin, 
polu» = a pole + Greek, metron — a 
measure.) The art of using the polarimeter. 

Polariscope (po-lar -is-cope). [Latin, polus 
— a pole -)- Greek, skopeo = I see.] An 
instrument having two chambers, contain- 
ing tourmaline, in which a pebble is ana- 
lyzed by passing through the first chamber 
and polarized after the rays of light have 
passed through the second chamber. 

(To he continued.) 


February 6, 1901. 


THE JEWELERS’ CIRCULAR- WE IIKLY. 


93 


Optical Department 

{Continued /ro7n Page 92 .] 


Against Proposed Legislation. 


Committee of Opticians Appear at Albany to 
Oppose Assembly Bill No. 167. 

A hearing before the State Committee 
on Public Health was held at Albany, 
N. Y., Wednesday last, on Assembly Bill 
No. 167 to amend Section 15’2 of Chapter 
661, of Laws of 1892, which was attended 
by a representative committee of New 
York opticians for the purpose of remon- 
strating against the bill becoming a law. 
The passage of the bill would create great 
injury to the opticians of the State, aa 
pointed out in The Circular-Weekly of 
Jan. 23. 

This bill was framed by the New York 
County Medical Society and introduced by 
Assemblyman Bell. It was designed prin- 
cipally to control the practice by Christian 
Scientists, but it also had a bearing on the 
optical business, the importance of which 
was quickly seen. So much opposition 
had developed to the original wording of 
the bill that some changes were voluntarily 
proposed by the framers of the bill at the 
hearing, but while these changes improve 
in some respects the bearing of the bill 
on the optician, the latter are not satsified. 
Section 152 of the bill, as originally pre- 
sented to the Assembly, read as follows: 

“Any person shall be regarded as practicing 
rnedicine within the meaning of this act who shall 
prescribe^ direct, recommend, or advise, for the use of 
any other person, any remedy or agent whatsoever, 
whether with or without the use of any medicine, 
drug, instrument or other appliance, for the treat- 
ment, relief, or cure of any wound, fracture, or 
bodily injury, infirmity, physical or mental, or 
other defect or disease. This article shall not be 
construed as prohibiting the service of any person 
in an emergency ♦ * ♦ * or any manufacture 
of artificial eyes, limbs or orthopedic instruments 
or trusses, in fitting such instruments on persons 
in need thereof, when such artihcial eyes, limbs or 
orthopedic instruments or trusses are prescribed by 
lawfully qualihed physicians,” etc. 

The amendments proposed to the fore- 
going since the opposition developed 
would remove some of the oflending 
clauses, but they would not satisfy the 
opticians. It is proposed to omit the 
words printed in italics and substitute for 
the first omission: “give treatment to” 

and add other words which would make 
the opening clause of Section 152 read 
thus: . 

“Any person shall be regarded as practicing 
medicine within the meaning of this act who shall 
give treatment to any other person, by the use of 
any remedy, agent or method whatsoever, whether 
with or without the use of any medicine, drug, in- 
strument or other appliance, for the relief, or 
cure,” etc. 

The opticians object strongly to the 
phrase “give treatment to,” basing their 
objections on the interpretation of the word 
“treatment.” It is claimed that on this 
point hinges the whole question as the 
matter now stands. In order to make this 
right, the opticians desire a phrase in- 
serted in the section of the bill, so that it 
shall provide that the article shall not be 
“construed as prohibiting the service of 
any person in an emergency * * * 

or any optician in adapting glasses to the 
sight." The last phrase is one desired to 
be added, but it is also a phrase over which 
there is likely to be much opposition de- 
veloped. 


At the hearing, Wednesday last, most of 
the time was taken up by the Christian 
Scientists and comparatively little atten- 
tion was given the other opposing inter- 
ests. Addresses were made by president 
A. J. CrooS, of The American Association 
of Opticians, and by A. Martin, of Brook- 
lyn, the latter in reply to Dr. Howe, of 
the Buffalo Medical College, who spoke 
for oculists who favored the bill in its 
original form. In order to give the opti- 
cians opportunity to present their side of 
the case in detail, on the lines described 
above, the committee adjourned the hear- 
ing until Feb. 6, at Albany, when 
Mr. Cross, Charles F. Prentice, L. L. 
Ferguson, P. A. Dilworth, H. W. Apple- 
ton and others will be present to look 
after the opticians’ interests. 


NEW YORK STATE ASSOCIATION OF OPTICIANS 
PASS RESOLUTIONS. 

Syracuse, N. Y., Jan. 28. — A special 
business meeting of the New York State 
Association of Opticians was held in the 
Assembly room of The Yates, this evening, 
to protest against ■ Assembly Bill No. 167, 
and arrange measures to compass its de- 
feat. 

There was a large attendance and lively 
discussions w.ere followed by the adoption 
of the following resolutions which were 
framed by a committee composed of H. C.' 
Watts and William D. Oertel, of Syracuse, 
and G. N. Luckey, of Baldwinsville. 

Whereas, There is now before our Legislature 
at Albany a measure known as Assembly Bill 167, 


which if enacted a law will legislate all refracting 
opticians out of business. Therefore, be it. 

Resolved, That the New York State Association 
of Opticians, assembled in special session, do 
most emphatically protest against this unjust meas- 
ure and base our protests upon the following facts: 
1st. For centuries opticians have fitted glasses to 
the public at large with utmost satisfaction and 
have invented many of the instruments used in 
such work. It is comparatively a short period 
since some of the medical profession have taken 
up this work, using the same methods and imple- 
ments that we use, with no better results, and now 
they seek to monopolize the profession by legis- 
lating us out of business. 2d. The science of 
adapting glasses to correct refractive errors is 
purely mechanical and therefore does not require 
a medical education. 

Further be it resolved. That a copy of these resolu- 
tions be forwarded by our representatives to the 
Assembly Committee on Public Health, to which 
this bill has been referred. 

William D. Oertel and H. C. Watts, of 
Syracuse, were elected to represent the As- 
sociation at Albany. 

Among those in attendance at the ses- 
sion were: James Holden, G. N. Babbitt, 
H. S. Fuller, F. W. Reed, H. C. Watts, W. 
O. Conger, of Syracuse; A. W. Golder, of 
Seneca Falls; F. L. Swart, of Auburn; 
Edwin Wilco.x, of Fulton; John Wagner, 
of Utica; W. J. Fuller, of Phoenix; E. B. 
Steele, of Newark; G. E. Holmes, of Clif- 
ton Springs; M. J. O’Hara, of Camillus; 
O.' H. Wright, of Batavia, and G. N. 
Luckey, of Baldwinsville. 


action by the st.ate optical society. 

The Optical Society of the State of New 
York have sent out a circular letter to all 
opticians of New York State, quoting the 
objectionable parts of the amended bill. 


OPERA GLASSES 



OUR SPECIAL MAKES: 

LEMAIRE, 

LA REINE, 

LEFILS. 

SUSSFELD, LORSCH & CO., ^ ^new " iS^K. 


94 


February 6, 1901. 


THE JEWELERS’ CIRCULAR-WEEKLY. 


Optical Department. 

[Conrir.ut d from page <i7.] 

and concluding with these expressions of 
opinion: 

and at once, on receipt of this letter, all op- 
ticians and friends of fair play are asked to write 
or telegraph to the members of Assembly Chamber, 
Albany, to please vote against Assembly Bill 167, 
as it will kill the opticians’ honorable calling by 
requiring those of the public who buy glasses to 
first pay an oculist's fee for the prescription before 
allowing opticians to furnish the glasses; further- 
more, there is nothing in this bill that prohibits 
the doctor from furnishing patients with glasses 
if they so desire, thus legislating opticians out of 
business entirely. 

It is a pernicious measure born of selfishness and 
a desire to further class legislation. It is narrow, 
tending to discourage scientific advancement; «ii- 
reasonable, because physicians, as physicians, by 
their own confession, possess only a superficial 
knowledge of the laws governing light in its trans- 
mission through lenses; and misleading, because 
the true inwardness of the measure is fostered, not 
by general practitioners of medicine, but by de- 
signing specialists who seek to hide behind the 
cloak of the family doctor and force the public 
to pay fancy medical fees for mathematical and 
mechanical services. 

Immediate action on your part is necessary, as 
the bill comes up for hearing on Wednesday, Feb. 
6, and your Assemblyman should receive your letter 
or telegram on that day. Use your influence to 
have others interested write also. 

This letter is signed by F. L. Swart, Au- 



TO OPTICIANS: 

The Search-Light vapor 
lamps are specially 
adapted for Opticians 
and Jewelers. We re- 
fer you to our adver- 
tisement on page 76 of 
this paper. 

Search-Light Mfg. Co. 

358 Dearborn Street, 
CHICAGO, ILL. 


CHICAGO COLLEGE OF OPTICS. 

TECHNICAL AND PRACTICAL 
TRAINING SCHOOL FOR 
. REFRACTING OPTICIANS. 

Average term of attendance four weeks, but 
course not limited in time. 

Write for prospectus. 


College Rooms and Dioptric Clinic, 

Suite 21, 69 Dearborn Street. 

QEO. A. ROGERS, Principal. 


DR. KNOWLES’ 

PRIVATE COURSE IN 

Optometry. 

SPECIAL RATES IN THE 
CORRESPONDENCE DEPARTMENT. 


“EYE DEFECTS,” 

A. Xew BooVc, in cloth, Brice, $1.00. 


For terms and important particulars, write to 

R. H. KNOWLES, M. D., 

541 Fulton St., Brooklyn, N. Y. 


burn. X. Y.. president of the Optical So- 
ciety of the State of New York. 


RESOLUTIONS OF NEW YORK CITY SOCIETY. 

The resolutions which were adopted at 
a special meeting of the Optical Society 
of the City of Xew York, at the Fifth Ave. 
Hotel. Jan. '28, which meeting was report- 
ed in The Circul.vr-Weekly last week, 
were as follows: 

Whereas. The existing medical acts of the State 
of Xew York have proved amply sufficient to pro- 
tect the practicers of medicine from the impostures 
of charlatans and quacks, as is shown by the 
numerous successful prosecutions that obtain in 
this country yearly, and 

Whereas, The passage of Assembly Bill Xo. 167 
will create a monopoly of the adaptation of lenses 
to the human eyesight, placing in the hands of 
less than 200 ophthalmologists the exclusive sale or 
right to designate where such shall be adapted 
or sold to the 6,000,000 citizens of this State, 
thereby creating a monopoly for oculists, who, as 
a class, have not existed for 50 years, while opti- 
cians who have pursued their vocation for 400 
years are, upon the passage of this act, disbarred. 

Be it Resolved, That it is the sense of the Optical 
Society of the City of Xew York that further med- 
dling or the amending of the existing medical acts 
is vicious in its conception and uncalled for by the 
citizens of this city and State, and we do hereby 
protest against this attempted pre-emption or cur- 
tailment of our vested rights which our profes- 
sion has enjoyed for the past 400 years. 

From the foregoing it will be seen how 
thoroughly in earnest the opticians are in 
the fight for what is a matter of vital in- 
terest to their business as opticians. 


Optical Briefs and Xotes. 

George Hardy, of the Bay State Optical 
Co., Attleboro, Mass., was in Denver, Col., 
last week. 

Elwood Riggs, manager of the Colum- 
bian Optical Co., Kansas City, Mo., was 
called to Omaha last week on business. 

J. B. White, Columbus, O., has branched 
out into the jobbing business to some ex- 
tent and is well satisfied with the trial he 
has given it. 

Fred. S. Benedict, a well known optician, 
died at his home on Stranwood St., Cleve- 
land, O., last week. Mr. Benedict was .56 
years of age. 

C. X. Sheldon started on a trip through 
Kansas, Missouri and Xebraska, last week, 
in the interest of the Merry Optical Co., 
Kansas City, Mo. 

Irving Silverstein has resigned his posi- 
tion with the Merry Optical Co., Kansas 
City, Mo. He has been in their employ 
for the past two years. 

Benjamin T. Popenoe, traveler for the 
Columbian Optical Co., Kansas City, Mo., 
has just returned from a trip through 


Kansas and Missouri and reports trade as 
being excellent. 

J. R. Kingston, city salesman for the 
Globe Optical Co., Boston, Mass., was 
confined to his home last week by reason 
of a severe attack of grip. 

On Wednesday evening last, X. E. Har- 
ris, of the optical department of the Hof- 
man Supply Co., Columbus, O., was mar- 
ried to Miss Sarah Williams. 

■ Edwin P. Leonard, employed in the case 
department of the Globe Optical Co., Bos- 
ton, Mass., is receiving congratulations 
over the advent of a son on Jan. 31. 

O. S. Johnson, Topeka, Kan.; C. A. 
Clement, Springfield, Mo., and F. W. 
Swearingen, Topeka, Kan., were among 
the opticians who called on the Kansas 
City jobbers last week. 

Mr. Moore, representing F. W. Gess- 
wein Co., Xew York, called on the whole- 
sale trade in Kansas City, Mo., last week. 
Mr. Schneider, traveling salesman for 
Hammel, Riglander & Co., New York, 
was also in, Kansas City last week. 

The H. Cole Co., Columbus, O., are 
making a specialty of engineers’ instru- 
ments and supplies as well as optical goods, 
and within the last six months a splendid 
business in this line has been built up. 
The compan}’ have their manufacturing de- 
partment in splendid shape now and a 
large amount of special work is done. 

The California State Association of Op- 
ticians have elected the following officers: 
President, E. M. Ackley. San Francisco 
(reelected); first vice-president, S. G. Mar- 
shutz, Los Angeles (reelected); second 
vice-president, C. L. Hogue, San Fran- 
cisco; treasurer, W. H. Hunt, Oakland 
(reelected); secretary, G. L. Schneider, 
Stockton (reelected). 

C. A. Gager, optician, Cleveland, O., has 
just returned from a trip to Xuevitas and 
Matanzas, Cuba. He went there in the in- 
terest of certain persons who are contem- 
plating investment in land in that section 
of the island. Mr. Gager was not favora- 
bl}' impressed with the opportunities for 
business for either opticians or jewelers in 
Cuba. Few persons on the island, except 
the aged and infirm, wear glasses. Publi- 
cations are few and only a small percent- 
age of the inhabitants can read, and the 
necessity for glasses is not felt. There are 
fine opportunities, however, for cattle graz- 
ing. gardening and dealing in eggs and 
produce. The products of the dairy and 
market garden bring good prices and there 
is a large demand. Many Americans visit 
the parts where Mr. Gager stopped. 



POWER EIGHT. ONR-THIRO SIZE. 

“universal." 

PRICE, $45.00. 


Warner &SWASEY 

PRISM 

FIELD GLASSES. 

POWERFUL AS ATELESCOPE. 
SMALL AS AN OPERA GLASS. 

Send for igoi Booklet. 

THE WARNER & SWASEY CO. 

CLEVELAND, OHIO. 



POWER EIGHT. PNP-THIPD 

“ INDIVIDUAL." 


PRICE, $40.00. 




February 6, 1901. 


THE JEWELERS’ CIRCULAR-WEEKLY. 


!)5 


D. W. Beadel, Syracuse, N. Y., is spend- 
ing two weeks with his son at New Castle, 
Pa. 

H. A. Lambke, an optical goods dealer 
of Tacoma, Wash., has given a chattel 
mortgage for $536. 

The Kansas Optical Co. is the name of 
1 new corporation who have just opened 
for business in Wichita, Kan. 

Among the opticians from the vicinity 
of Syracuse, N. Y., in attendance at th; 
learing on the Bell bill in Albany, 
on Wednesday last, were: William D. 

Oertel and H. C. Watts, of Syracuse; A. 
W. Colder, of Seneca Falls, and F. L. 
Swart, of Auburn. 

The wedding of Wayne Orlo Conger, 
optician, with FT. C. Watts, Syracuse, N. 
Y., and Leona Alair Fralick occurred in 
the presence of a large number of friends 
and relatives -on the evening of Jan. 16, at 
1 o’clock, at the home of the bride’s pa- 
■ents, Mr. and Mrs. John P. Fralick. Af- 
ter a trip to New Y'ork and Boston Mr. 
and Mrs. Conger are at home to their 
riends at 202 Furman St. 

The Indiana Optical Society had a meer- 
ng Jan. 29 at the Dennison Hotel, Indian- 
ipolis, Ind. The meeting was an enthusi- 
istic one, from which it is thought much 
mod will come to the opticians. The fol- 
owing officers were elected: E. Shipley, 
Jreencastle, president; J. H. Arnold, Co- 
umbus, vice-president; G. M. Bartmess, 
Tinton, secretary; Miss Stella Rogers, In- 
lianapolis, first assistant secretary; Miss 
Elizabeth Crane, Indianapolis, second as- 
ustant secretary; E. O. Collins, Franklin; 
E. M. Jenkins, Richmond; O. N. Ridge- 
-vay, Sheridan; Paul E. Hulsman, Indian- 
ipolis, and W. H. McDougal, Indianapo- 
is, executive committee. The society were 
>rganized about four years ago to better 
ight a bill before the State Legislature, 
.vhich was considered detrimental to the 
)ptical profession. Having accomplished 


that effort the society gradually became 
more and more inactive until this meeting, 
which put new life into the cause. The new 
officers are determined to make the society a 
working one and to do everything to pro- 
mote the advancement of the profession in 
Indiana. It was decided to- have at least 
four meetings during the year. It is 
thought the president will soon call a meet- 
ing to take up much unfinished business. 


Optical Trade Notes. 


The Spencer Coerulean frameless eye 
glasses and spectacles are the latest im- 
provement in dioptrics. By them a per 
fectly clear and flawless lens will have the 
same effect as a- blue tinted lens without 
necessary loss of lens power caused by 
the mass of blue in the ordinary variety. 
Up to the present time nothing had 
been done in the way of relieving super 
orbital headaches caused by bright, pure 
white concave spherical lenses for myopic 
patients other than prescribing blue tinted 
lenses, which neutralize the orange rays of 
light, which are the disturbing factor, pro- 
ducing irritation upon a sensitive myopic 
retina. The Spencer Optical Mfg. Co. 
have succeeded, after years of careful ex- 
perimenting, in producing a patent lens 
so constructed that direct or central vision 
improved by the correction will not be 
interfered with by a mass of blue glass as 
in the old method. The blue tint will be 
diffused from the periphery, thereby per- 
fectly neutralizing the orange rays with- 
out the least sacrifice as to the definition 
of the lens or diminution of vision in con- 
sequence of an interception of the waves 
of light. 


W. E. Knuth has purchased the entire 
business of the Helena Lapidary Co., He- 
lena, Mont. 


E. THOS. JACKSON. 


SAMUEL C. JACKSON. 


Stocks 

Bonds 


JACKSON BROS., 

Bankers and Brokers, Cotton 
Investment Securities 


B. tTHOS. JACKSON, 
Formerly S. C. JACKSON’S SON, 
Jewelry Case Mannfacttirer, 
of i8o Broadway. 


No. 1 Wall Street, 

NEW YORK. 


Patented in United States and Canada. 



TTTTT 


INDISPENSABLE TO THE 
RETAIL JEWELER. 

Wells’ Perfect 

SelLConforming 

Ring Adjuster. 


No G. No. 7. 


No. 8. 


No. 9. 


No. «0. 

Size of rings used on — 5 to 8. 4 to 7. 5 to 8. 6 1-2 to 10. 8 to It. 

The lower ends of the live above cuts are the exact width of the same number ad- 
uster, so you can easily tell the size should they get mixed. They can be fitted in 
uy ring of any shaped shank that is as wide as the lower ends or not wider than the 
pper ends of above cuts. This adjuster retains the finger in the center of ring. 

Hows free circulation of the blood and may be removed by pressing on end of grip 
^Ith thumb nail of same hand the ring is on. or replaced by the wearer very easily 
C desired while the ring remains on the finger _ * 

Wholesale prices are as follows: Idoz. 10 K. gold, assorted sizes, 11(8.75; onedoz. metal, assorted sizes, 85c: 1»y 
he single piece, 10 K. gold, No. 6, S5e; Xo. 7, 80c; Nos. 8 or 9, 40o; No. 10, 50e. Metal, any size, lOc; or 8 for 26c. 
Ask your jobber for them, or I will send at once pry>aid only on receipt of price. Stamps taken for small amounts; 
aoney orders for larger ones. Address, CHESTER H. WEELS, Jeweler, Mcislioppen, Pa. 

These adjusters have been thoroughly tested and will s'^and hard usage when fitted in a ring. 

^ Prices charged by jewelers when they fit them in a ring are: 

No. 6, 5 0c ; No, 7, 60c; Nos. 8 or 9, 75c; No. 1 0, 81.00 each. Meiul, any size, 25c each. 


Hy having an assortment of 
these adjusters in stock, a 
jeweler can often sell a ring 
which he could not sell with- 
out them; and, besides, there 
are many rings in use that 
need one of these adjusters 
which can be fitted at a 
good profit 


I THE BARLOW 

0 

1 f 



No. 574. 


? Triple Glass Shelf Fixture, showing ? 
i guard railing; base, 9 inches diameter; • 
T plate-glass shelves, 14, l8 and 22 inches | 
i square. ? 

I No. 574, price |17.00 each. Prices on f 
? other sizes on application. Send for 200- • 
f page catalogue and supplement. | 

BARLOW MFG. CO., I 

I Holyoke, Mass. | 

• Boston Salesrooms, 125 Summer St. ? 

• T 


PIRIE MAC DONALD 

gives you 

G 'R.EETING, He has a worRshop 
on the 16 th floor of the Wash-= 
ington Life ‘Building, New York, 
where he makes photographs and 
various other kinds of portraits 
of men. Not but that he loves 
women, as all good men should, 
but because he knows he 
can make men’s pictures best. 

“ Blessed is that man who has 
found his work.” 


HENRY C. 
HASKELL, 

Desi^er 
and riaker. 

Pine Gold 
Rings, Medals, 
Society Pins, 
Emblem Jewels, 
Etc., 

From exclusive 
designs, 

9-1H3 Maiden Lane, - new YORK. 




S. GOLDNER 

MANUFACTURER OF 

Fine Diamond 
Mountings, 

85 Nassau St., New York. 



Pat. applied for. 



96 


THE JEWELERS’ CIRCULAR-WEEKLY. 


February C, 1901. 










I 

( 

• 

I 

T 

• 

1 

; 

• 

i 

T 


1 

t 

I 


: 

t 

i 

I 

? 

t 

» 


i 


The Francis Engraver 

SAMPLES. 

Why Refused. Why Misunderstood. How Cut. How Should be Cut. Effect on Trade. 


S urprise is expressed because I refuse to cut and send samples 
to those who write for them. I stopped that over a year ago. 
Claims have been made that it was caused by a failure on the 

part of the machine to perform the work satisfactorily. If those seek- 

ing for information knew the truth, they would know that a sample 
cut on sheet aluminum with a special graver Is a poor index by which 
to estimate the merits of a machine. Jewelers have shown me samples 
of this kind that were sent to them with a blank of the same kind, 
accompanied with a request that the blank be sent to me to be cut for 
comparison, and the following is added: "Mr. Francis will probably 

refuse to cut the sample for you; if so, we leave it for you to draw 
your own conclusions.” It is easy to see that I would refuse after what is 
said on page 741 of the .\ugust Keystone. It says: “I positively 

refuse to cut samples unless the party requesting them is present to 
see them cut.” The catalogue says: “Samples prove nothing,” and 

this has been written many times. Space has never permitted me 

to go into detail to make the matter plain to others. Now that it is 
being used against me I will explain : First, Why the refusal is made. 
Second, Why the value of a sample as evidence of a machine’s effi- 
ciency is misunderstood. Third, How samples are cut. Fourth, How 
they should be cut. Fifth, How they have affected some who have 
relied on them to a finish. 

Samples have been refused because special cuttings are accepted 
as samples of general work, and specimens of general work are turned 
down by comparison because erroneously supposed to be inferior. In 
cutting samples of general work the cheapest Francis can put to 
shame the defender of any other machine, but this mistaken idea of 
the public, of making an exception a standard, put a quietus on my 
part; for I will not send samples that the machine cannot back up 
in the hands of others. Samples cut as I shall describe have a peculiar 
style of their own that is very effective, but of no particular value 
to the jeweler. It is one of the limits to which special work can be 
carried. It has not yet attained that degree of perfection shown by 
the professional sample maker for sewing machine companies, who 
can depict Father Time, with silken hair, flowing beard and a keen- 
edged scythe, striding forth on his endless mission; work so cun- 
ningly wrought that it might be mistaken for a painting. The intelli- 
gent housewife, in quest of a machine for family work, does not take 
such things for her standard of excellence in making a choice, and 
when she gets her machine she does not have to make Father Time 
seven hundred times weary in trying to put him on a napkin, for she 
never expected to do it; but the jeweler expects to put a fac-simile 
of that identical special sample on some napkin ring, and if time was 
not endless and all human things mortal, the old gentleman would 
drop his scythe and throw up his hands in despair at the thought. 

The old Spencer-IIarris machine was sold over thirty years ago; 
the Wright flourished over twenty years ago. Each had its day of 
usefulness and has long since been buried. I can resurrect one of 
either kind, and with it reproduce any of these little, flat, machine- 
cut aluminum samples that have appeared since their days. Of course, 
in doing this I would have to provide graver and type. These are 
the essentials in making such samples on perfectly flat surfaces — not 
carefully constructed machines. Machines are carefully constructed 
to bring the graver, type and a great variety of work into proper rela- 
tions to correctly apply the principle on which the engraver is built 
— not simply to push a graver forward as a planer does it. 

If aluminum is wet with squeegee solution while being cut, and is 
afterwards washed in gasoline to remove the paraffine, the brilliancy of 
the cut is unequaled. This makes it the easiest of metals to engrave 
nicely. Cutting in imitation of handwork by grinding and setting 
gravers to cut all on one side is the most effective. To produce the 
best special samples requires some preparation. A special graver must 
be produced with great care, perfect type, a bottle of squeegee solution, 
a swab, a washing tray and some blanks that are perfectly flat. Having 
dressed a graver so that it can be set with its cutting edge nearly hori- 
zontal, so that when its point has entered the metal to the depth of a 
sixty-fourth of an inch, its edge is skimming the surface back a distance 
covering a good wide shade (as the skilled engraver does it with the 
fiat side of his burin), we have accomplished the hardest part. Of 
course, in sharpening it we have tried to free it as nearly as possible 
from every microscopic nick or scratch. In this condition it will leave 
a cut that reflects light like a mirror. If the machine has a turning 


point any letter will do, but if the graver is stationary our choice of 
type must be limited to letters having shades all running as nearly as 
possible in the same direction. Such work is best when each shade is 
cut with a rapid stroke. If the machine is handicapped by having a 
stationary graver it requires a considerable practice to reach the highest 
attainable proficiency necessary to make fairly presentable samples. 
A stationary graver can only cut shades that are nearly parallel. In 
all such samples the shades only are effective. 

If a few parallel shades are pleasing when nicely cut, and are 
accepted, where a sample of a machine’s general work conveys no 
adequate impression of its value as evidence of efficiency, how does 
the recipient of such specimens explain his estimate of effectiveness 
when he learns that the same graver, held in the same position, will 
cut the same parallel shades whether held in an engraving machine, 
the stock of a Boynton shaper, the cross^head of a Rockford planer, 
or the arbor of a type machine? 

A customer asks for samples to have ocular evidence before him 
that the machine is correctly built. If a number are sent he picks out 
those that suit him best, probably without a thought as to the conditions 
under which they might have been cut. A dozen samples, cut in a 
dozen ways on the same machine, would give him a dozen impressicns, 
each of a different machine, or if the cuts were made when the tool 
was held in something not an engraving machine, as I have shown 
they can be, and a photograph of the cutting could be seen, he 
would probably say that he did not want to buy at all, and conclude 
that I was right when I said: “Samples prove nothing.” 

The man who buys by them makes them his criterion, by which he 
estimates the machine’s value as applied to his work, and from the day 
he sends in his order until he receives the machine, many times in his 
“mind’s eye” he transfers the letters to some odd-shaped article of 
more or less value, that he expects to engrave when sold. He does 
not realize that the graver that cuts the special work would not do for 
anything else. If this graver was ever sent with the machine he w'ould 
soon realize it, but I never send a special graver of this kind unless 
ordered, and I have only received orders for two during the past year. 
Think of this graver, with a nearly horizontal cutting edge, cutting 
toward you, on one side of a slightly oval surface, where its edge 
would take out a broadside of metal where a hair line was intended; 
then think of it again, cutting in the same direction, on the other side 
of same oval, where a shade was intended, and see how impotent it is 
to make anything but the narrowest kind of a line. Now, when it is 
especially remembered that there is no machine having a graver that 
can be tilted in operation, if you do not see that such a tool is utterly 
useless in general work you cannot be naturally endow'ed with a strong 
love for mechanics. 

Samples should be cut with a machine ready for general work, with 
gravers made with equal sides and worked in a perpendicular stock, 
or without lateral tilt, so that each side has the same cutting surface, 
as in cutting ovals the cut gains on one side of the graver what it loses 
on the other. These are always sent with a machine, and if samples 
were cut with them the buyer could reproduce the sample very soon 
after having received his machine, and his satisfaction would be com- 
plete. 

When a machine is sold from samples cut with a special graver of 
the kind mentioned, the buyer is alw-ays trying to reproduce them. 
Not having the graver, and perhaps the type, or the skill, he is of 
course facing an impossibility. Nevertheless, he tries, and tries hard; 
he thinks the fault is in himself; he works hopelessly, but keeps at it. 
Explain to him the cause of his failure, and if his machine has a fault 
that he does not show up to you, as having been revealed to him, it is 
of such a minor character that he has overlooked it in his excitement. 

It takes an expert hand engraver to equal the general work done 
by the Francis. Some of the best hand engravers to be found in the 
jewelry stores buy them. They say: “We have always had a man, or 
have always done our own engraving, but our time is worth more to 
us if .given to other work; we have help whose time can better be 
applied to it. We find that the work is as good as our own iq most 
ways, better in some, and that it will save us something in not requir- 
ing skilled help. Send us your best machine and outfit.” 

The machine and its work are superior to anything else ever offered, 
and when claims are made that my refusal to send samples is based on 
anything unsatisfactory in the machine or its work, they are false. 


M. E. FRANCIS, 780 Cedar AVe., CLEVELAND, OHIO. 


I 










I 

! 

i 


I 

i 




! 


February 6, 1901. 


THE JEWELERS’ CIRCULAR-WEEKLY. 


97 


the jewelry REPAIRER’S 
HANDBOOK, 


Copyright by The Jewelers’ Circular Pub. Co., 1901. 


T his series of articles is presented 
mainly for that large class of work- 
men who have learned their trade in 
stores and who desire to know the best 
as well as the latest methods employed in 
jewelry repair shops. With this end in 
view the author intends to explain meth- 
ods more fully than he otherwise would 
to workmen who have made the repair- 
ing of jewelry a specialty. The first thing 
to consider is 

THE BENCH. 

The jeweler’s bench must be strong 
and well made and securely fastened to 
the floor to insure firmness. Its dimen- 
sions should be about 3 ft. 4 in. high, 2 
ft. wide and 3 ft. long and the top If in. 
thick. 

The bench usually contains two drawers; 
one — measuring from 21 to 24 in. long, 18 
in. wide and 3 in. deep — immediately be- 
low the top of the bench, in which all tools 
are kept when not in use, and when closed 
it should be at least 3 inches back from 
the edge of the bench to allow the jeweler’s 
hand perfect freedom while working at 
the bench pin; the other, or lap pan, 
from 21 to 24 in. long, 24 in. wide and If 
in. deep in front and having sloping sides 
which make the drawer 4J in. deep at the 
back. This pan is lined with zinc, and 
when pulled out lies snugly in the jew- 
eler’s lap and catches all filings and 
scraps that fall from his work. 

A very important part about the bench 
is the bench pin, and the writer has been 
considerably surprised to learn that very 
many jewelers have never heard of it. Into 
the edge of the top of the bench and above 
the middle of the lap-pan, a hole is cut 
about 3 in. long, 2J in. deep and I of an 
inch wide. Into this hole is fastened the 
bench pin — a flat piece of wood about 3 
in. wide, i in. thick and extending 3 in. 
from the edge of the bench. Another 
style of pin with two surfaces — one flat 
and the other sloping — is used for filing 
rings. This style can be made to order 
or obtained from any material dealer. 

On the bench pin most of the work is 
done, and it has aptly been called a third 
hand. Its further uses will be pointed out 
in the sequel. 

TOOLS. 

The beginner need not have many tools 
with which to begin work; indeed, fo" 
some time, in shops, he does not do any- 
thing but saw straight and curved lines in 
copper or brass plate. Then the tools re- 
quired are a saw-frame and blades, a pair 
of flat pliers, a rule or straight-edge, a 
pair of dividers and a scribing point. As 
he advances he makes flat band rings of 
the strips, and for this work he requires 
a cut-off size gauge, one of which will be 
found on the top of every Allen ring-stick, 
a pair of shears, a pair of half-round 
pliers, a half-round file, a ring mandril, a 
rawhide mallet — small size — & blow-pipe, 
soldering block or charcoal, a borax slate 
and cake of borax, a small camel’s-hair 
brush, a water-bottle, a pickle pan, a pickle 
cup and a soldering lamp, either alcohol 
or gas. Provided with these tools, the be- 


ginner is enabled to make up plain rings, 
and as he progresses he can do many re- 
pair jobs without requiring any more tools. 
But as these will be needed some time 
or other, below is presented a complete 
list of them, the use of each being briefly 
explained when considered necessary: 
Alcohol lamp. Bench-brush. 


Alcohol cup. 

Anvil. 

Blow-pipe. 
Borax-slate. 

Burnishers ) 

Camel’s-hair brush. 
Charcoal block. 
Draw-plate. 
Drawing tongs. 


Beading tools. 

Borax. 

Blow-pipe. 


Drills. 
Eyeglass. 
Emery sticks. 


Files 


f Half-round. 
1 Flat. 
Barrette. 


Needle. 


J Large. 
) Small. 


( Coarse 
- and 
i Fine. 

f Knife-edge. 

1 Round. 

I Square, 
t 3-cornered. 
Matting tools. 
Magnet. 

f Hard 

Oil-stones 


and 
I Soft. 




Gravers. 

Hand-vise. 

Hammers 
Lamp. 

Pendant bow contractor and ring bender, 
f Rivet. 

I Round. 

I Half-round. 

Pliers ■{ Flat. 

Parallel. 

1 Cutting, 
t Pointed flat. 


Pusher. 
Pump-drill. 
Punches. 
Pin-vises. 

Ring mandril. 
Ring clamp. 
Ring size stick. 
Rawhide mallet. 
Scotch-hone. 
Screw-drivers. 
Sieve. 

Shears. 

Soldering lamp. 
Spiral turners. 


Saw-frame and 
blades. 

Split tweezers. 
Soldering-iron. 
Setting mandril. 
Testing-stone and 
needles. 

Tweezers. 

Vise. 

Water-bottle. 
Wax-box. 
Wa.x-point. 

W atchmaker s’ me- 
dium stiff brush. 

The beading tools are tapering pieces of 
tempered steel, about four inches long, and 
have a concaved end which forms the beads 
or grains used when setting pearls. The 
tools are held in graver handles and are 
given a rolling motion. 

Prepared borax can be bought at any 
material house, but crystallized borax, ob- 
tained in any drug store, will answer just 
as well. 

The spoon-burnisher is made by soften- 
ing and rounding and retempering the wide 
end of a flat file. This burnisher is used 


for removing dents, etc., from spoon bowls. 

The small camel’s-hair brush is used for 
placing the borax paste on the joint to be 
soldered. A larger one can be used for 
anti-oxidizing purposes. 

Every jeweler should have a draw-plate 
with round holes and a pair of drawing 
tongs. 

The matting tools are used to mat the 
solder which has run into the engraving 
or matting of band rings. 

The magnet and sieve are used to remove 
dirt and steel, as well as iron, from the 
filings and scraps of gold. 

The pendant bow contractor is used to 
bend very heavy rings which cannot be 
bent with the half-round pliers. 

The rivet pliers are used to extract rivets 
from joints which resist all other methods. 


They are made from a pair of English 
hawkbill case-pliers by drilling a hole 
through the end of the flat jaw and bending 
the curved end so that it will be exactly 
above the hole when the pliers are opened 
about a quarter of an inch. The curved 
part should be filed so as to go into the 
average joint without splitting it. It is 
not supposed to push the rivet out entirely, 
but simply to start it, after which it may 
be easily removed with a pair of pliers or 
a rivet punch. 

The ring clamp or vise is a wooden ar- 
rangement for holding rings while stones 
are being set in them. It is a very useful tool 
and should be employed by every jeweler. 

A spiral turner is a piece of steel about 
three or four inches long and one-fourth of 
an inch in diameter. The one end is 
fastened into a long handle and the other 
is filed flat. Then a groove is cut across 
the middle about one-eighth of an inch 
deep and wide enough to allow the spiral 
wire to enter. Then to the side of the mid- 
dle and about one-sixteenth of an inch 
from the top, a hole is drilled perpendicu- 
larly to the groove. A piece of wire is 
fitted into the hole, which will hold the 
spiral wire in position while being turned 
into a spiral. 

The split tweezers have two broad ends, 
one of which is sawed in half lengthwise 
for about a quarter of an inch. This is 
opened to form a triangle. A narrow 
band, which fits around the other end, is 
moved back or forth when an article is in- 
serted or taken out of the jaws. This tool 
is used mainly for holding scarf pins and 
button backs while soft-soldering. 

The setting mandril is made by softening, 
smoothing and retempering a large rat- 
tail file. This tool is used for rounding 
up settings that are made of gallery. 

The water-bottle should have a perfor- 
ated cork and is used to drop water on the 
borax slate to grind the paste for soldering 
purposes. 

The wax-box is an ordinary tin box half 
filled with wax which has been melted and 
allowed to cool. This box is used for 
keeping diamonds and other precious 
stones while on the work-bench. 

The wax-point is a conical piece of ordi- 
nary beeswax, the pointed end of which is 
used to pick up stones while setting them. 

The pusher, used to push the prongs over 
stones, is a piece of soft steel about three- 
sixteenths of an inch square and about two 
inches long. It is fastened into a graver 
handle so that an inch or an inch and a half 
protrudes, according to the length of the 
handle used. The end which comes in con- 
tact with the prong is slightly beveled back 
and roughened, so that it will not easily 
slip. 

The Scotch-hone or stone is very useful 
for removing scratches and file marks from 
articles to be polished, and especially so 
where engraving has been removed. 

{To be continued.) 


The wind last week demolished the glass 
window of the Martin & Hoerr jewelry 
store, Mankato, Minn. 

Miles Bradlejq for 20 years emp’oyed by 
the Bristol Brass and Clock Co., was found 
dead at his home on South St., Bristol, 
Conn., a few days ago. He was 65 years 
old and died of heart disease. 


9S 


THE JEWELERS’ CIRCULAR-WEEKLY. 


February G, 1901. 



rso. l43. 

Same as No. 137 , in ii-line, 
complete. 

Jobbers’ List Price, 


No. 144, 

Open face, lo-line, 
silver, gold plated, 
full jeweled, name- 
less movement, 
transparent enamel, 
inlaid fleur-de-lis, 
imitation pearl bor- 
der, back and front, 
with enameled filled 
pin to match; com- 
plete, in silk plush 
box. 

Jobbers’ List Price, 


No. 137. 


Open face, lo-line 
“Lady Racine,” gold- 
filled center and stem, 
beautiful transparent 
enamel, fancy inlaid, 
blue, green or red, 
with enameled filled- 
pin to match; com 
plete, in silk plush 
box. 


Jobbers’ List Price, 


$ 17 . 20 . 


$ 20 . 75 . 


$ 21 . 30 . 


FOR SALE BY ALL JOBBERS. 








“ B. A.” Gold Shell Collar Buttons 

are guaranteed as follows: “We will 

replace every ‘ B. A.’ button which for 
any reason proves unsatisfactory.” This 
guarantee is on the back of 
each card and our trade-mark ^ 
embossed on the front. 




w 

SHELL. 

REGISTERED. 


B. A. BALLOU & CO., 

Providence, R. 1. 








WORKSHOP KOTKS. 


Gold Size. — Mix yellow ochre, 1 part; 
copal varnish, 2 parts; linseed oil, 3 parts; 
turpentine, 4 parts; boiled oil, 5 parts. 
The ochre must be reduced to the finest 
powder and ground with a little of the oil 
before mixing. 

Gold Electroplating in hot baths is 
more regular, more rapidly obtained and 
possesses a deeper shade than that by cold 
baths. Crystallized soda phosphate, 2A oz. ; 
soda bisulphite, 31 oz. ; pure potassium 
cyanide, 1-3 oz.; pure gold transformed 
into chloride, 1-3 oz. ; distilled water, 2 1-5 
gal. This is satisfactory for electrogilding 
silver, bronze and other alloys rich in cop- 
per. 

Rusting of Tower Clocks. — The iron 
parts of turret clocks are much exposed to 
rust, for which reason they are generally 
provided with a rust-protector coating. 
For the prevention of rust a mixture has 
been found valuable which consists of 125 
parts of mutton tallow and 20 parts cam- 
phor melted together and mixed with a lit- 
tle graphite. The parts of the clock to be 
protected are coated with this. 

To Blanch Soldered Silver Ware. — 
To whiten soldered silver ware again mix 
in a porcelain dish 1 part of sulphuric acid 
with 20 parts of water. The soldered ar- 
ticle is then made red hot and thrown into 
this mixture. The mixture is now heated 
to a feeble boil for a few minutes. By this 
treatment the soldered silver ware obtains 
a very uniform, dull white color. The tak- 
ing out of the silver ware is best done 
with a wooden rod, for the sulphuric acid 
must positively not come in contact with 
any other metal. 

Gilding Articles to Look Like Polished 
Gold. — Dr. Ebermayer gives a formula for 
gilding articles so as to look like pol- 
ished gold, by simply dipping them into a 
warm solution. Dissolve 10 grammes gold 
in 40 grammes hydrochloric acid and 15 
grammes nitric acid; stew down, letting as 
much of the acid escape as possible; then 
throw down the gold as fulminating gold 
by means of spirit of ammonia; filter and 
wash. In the meantime dissolve 100 
grammes of potassium cyanide in as little 
water as possible and then dissolve the 
gold upon the filter with the cyanide solu- 
tion. 'Pour this solution again over the 
filter until all the brown particles are dis- 
solved, when the gilding solution is pre- 
pared by the addition of 1 liter distilled 
water. Into this solution, while warm, dip 
the metallic object to be gilded, and when 
drawn out it will have all the appearance 
of polished gold. 


Everybody knows that an invitation 
to a wedding is a gentle intimation 
that presents, however small, will be 
gratefully received by the bride. But it has 
been left to a distinguished native of India 
to make open confession of this pleasing 
hypocrisy. Writing to the people in his 
station, asking them to his daughter’s wed- 
ding, this man used the following formula: 

“Mr. and Mrs. request the presents of 

Col. and the officers of the 

ment at the wedding of their daughter.”' 
The story is true. — London Globe. 


February 6, 1901. 


THE JEWELERS’ CIRCULAR-WEEKLY. 


09 


VXF 


V.T.F 


V.TF 




ii 




/ 








Facts and Figures. 

It may interest you to know that during the twelve months ending 
September 30th, 1900, there were imported into the United States 

28,000,000 V. T. F. Watch Glasses. 

Had they not been sold to the jobbers and manufacturers as quickly as 
they were imported, the following results might have been accomplished; 

Placed side by side they would have formed a line 682 
miles long, or 4^ times the distance between Albany and 
New York. 

Placed one on top of the other they would have formed 
a column 166,600 feet high, or 542 times the height of the 
Statue of Liberty ; 346 times the height of the Pyramids of 
Egypt ; ten times the height of Pike’s Peak. 

What better proof that the quality of the V. T, F. surpasses all 
other makes as the quantity exceeds all others. 





That this department shall prove mutually beneficial to our readers, it is desirable that the 
members of the trade generally communicate with The Jewelers* Circular-Weekly regarding 
any advantageous device or plan that they are utilizing in connection with their business. 


PRIZE ESSAY COnPETlTION, NO. 2. 

SUBJECT : 

“how to Croat €M$tomer$-how to Sell.” 








No. 3. 

Prize Essay Competition. 

First Prize, $20. 
Second Prize, $10. 


These prizes will be given to the writers of 
essays on the subject 

“How to Foster Spring 
Trade.” 

The prize, will be for the best and most rea- 
•ooable essays, not for the language in which 
the ideas are expressed. Anyone may enter, 
whether he be a retailer, salesman or any 
employe. 

The standing of the judges who have kindly 
consented to act is a guarantee that the con- 
test will be carried on strictly on its merits 
and in an absolutely fair and impartial man- 
ner. We shall designate each contribution by 
a letter, keeping a list of contributors with 
the letters oi their articles. Thus the judges 
will not even know the names of the writers 
whose nroducts they pass upon. 


RULES: 

Essays must be in this office by Feb. 15, 1901. 
Essays must be written on one side of paper. 
No limit to number of words, and specimens of 
records are admissible. 


NOTE. — The Jewelers’ Circular-Weekly 
reserves the right to publish any or all of the 
competing essays received. 

Preference will be given, all other things be- 
ing equal, to those whose contributions reach 
US at the earliest date. 


POINTS OF COMMERCIAL LAW. 

■An agreement by which an employe is 
to receive a certain percentage of the 
profits of a business as compensation in 
whole or in part for his services does not 
create a partnership between the employer 
and employe, or as to creditors. 

A partner has no right, over the objec- 
tion of another partner, to execute prom- 
issory notes in the partnership name, or 
to execute a chattel mortgage on firm as- 
sets to secure the same, due immediately 
for debts which have not yet matured. 

All the members of a copartnership 
which has had continuous dealings with 
another are liable to him for goods pur- 
chased of him upon the credit of the firm 
after its dissolution, if he has had no no- 
tice of such dissolution, actual or by ad- 
vertisement. 


ON-GENIALITY is the keynote of 
success in selling goods, and the 
salesman (either wholesale or retail) who 
possesses this quality has an invaluable 
aid at his command. Tact, courtesy, 
knowledge of goods and ability to judge 
the prospective purchaser are also essen- 
tials which are not to be overlooked, but 
the main requisite is congeniality. 

Approaching a buyer with a smile, 
make him feel that you are pleased to do 
business with him and that it is a pleas- 
ure to serve him. By so doing you win 
half the battle. He instinctively reposes 
a certain amount of confidence in you 
and believes such representation as you 
may make regarding the articles he de- 
sires to purchase. This is equally true of 
ladies, and you can gently direct thei" 
thoughts tow’ard such articles as you desire 
to sell, without too strongly recommend- 
ing anything in particular; for if too ur- 
gent the impression is very quickly gained 
that there is some special reason for such 
action. 

Impress upon the prospective customer 
that you desire to serve him, but do not 
be too insistent upon his buying when he 
calls. Be pleased to show your goods, 
and even if no purcliase is made retain 
a cheerful frame of mind and countenance. 

Do not endeavor to impress the cus- 
tomer w'ith the idea that you are doing 
him a favor by waiting on him and that 
you possess superior knowledge. Many 
a man is quickly offended at having some 
preconceived notion regarding merchan- 
dise — of which he knows very little — sub- 
jected to ridicule, and this happens not 
infrequently with the younger salesmen. 
Show him where he is wrong, but do not 
do it in such a way as to give offence. 

Be ready to cheerfully rectify mistakes 
which may happen, and even at times go 
beyond what is strictly necessary in order 
to please your customer. 

If this method of doing business is con- 
scientiously and consistently carried out 
there is no reason why every jeweler 
should not be a success as a “salesman.” 

L. 


I T is an understood fact that all custom- 
ers cannot he treated the same way, 
hut a solid foundation may be built upon 
the one word “courtesy.” From a sales- 
man’s point of view this would mean: 
First, adopting an easy and pleasing man- 
ner in presenting goods to the prospective 


buyer and giving the impression that the 
salesman’s time is theirs; second, show- 
ing due appreciation of their tastes and 
ideas, giving suggestions whenever ne- 
cessary (precaution being taken in this 
connection, as a sale is often lost by an ill 
timed remark), and displaying knowledge 
of the' goods in a pleasant and inoffensive 
manner; third, retaining a courteous de- 
meanor if, perchance, the customer con- 
cludes not to purchase. 

In selling goods, great ability is not re- 
quired so much as a thorough knowledge 
of the goods and an honest representa- 
tion of the same. When the salesman real- 
izes the fact that by treating his custom- 
ers courteously he not only works for his 
own interests but for those of the firm 
and customer^ as well (for they are all 
so bound together that he cannot labor 
for the one without laboring for the oth- 
ers), he will no doubt find that this 
method of doing business will insure the 
return of the customers at some future 
time and an increase of sales, and there- 
by it solves the problem of “How to Treat 
Customers — How to Sell.” A. 


M y idea in waiting on a customer in a 
retail store is that when the cus- 
tomer enters the store he should be 
spoken to in a pleasant tone of voice. The 
salesman should not be too quick in 
asking if there is something he or 
she wants. Show whatever goods are 
wanted. If it be a watch, inquire as to 
size desired; explain the beautiful design 
of the engraving on the case, the color and 
the guarantee on both movement and 
case. If it be a ring, or any other article, 
show it in the same manner, convincing 
the customer that you have the finest and 
most tasty goods in the market. If the 
customer finds something that suits, let 
him or her inquire the price. Then state the 
same, but don’t let the custamer stand in 
an embarrassed mood: make him feel 

welcome and enjoy the call. Keep urging 
on the sale. After the sale is made invite 
the customer to be seated. Do up the 
goods in a neat manner and inquire if 
there is something else wanted. If not, 
thank the customer and invite him to call 
again. T. 


F. A. Vogt. South Bend, Ind., has a very 
pretty electric display in front of his place 
of business. It is in two colors, alterna- 
ting, and attracts considerable attention. 



Best Dre$$ea windows 

Jlitiottd tbe Retail Jewelers. 


of parts contained in a seven-jeweled El- 
gin watch. The prizes offered were a 
beautiful silk umbrella to the man 


On the day set for the guessing each lady 
guesser received free a “beauty pin.” 
The winners were Mrs. M. E. Halse, who 


Series II. Nos.’.XXVII. and XXVIII. 


NOTE. — We inaugurated with the issue of May 3, 
l8gg, the second scries of characteristic retail jewelers’ 
windows. The hrst series consisted of illustrations 
and descriptions of more than 100 different displays, 
extending over a period of eight years. We desire 
any jeweler who thinks his window is interesting or 
calculated to serve as a lesson to his brother jewelers, 
to send to us a photograph of such window for illus- 
tration under this department. 


VJ^ITHIN the next three weeks two 
^ » holidays of a patriotic character will 
occur — Lincoln’s Birthday, Feb. 12, and 
Washington’s Birthday, Feb. 22. As 
suggestions for symbolic jewelers’ win- 
dows we present here two pictures. The 
first one is a patriotic window display 
consisting of palms backing a flag sur- 
mounting which is a brass eagle. The 
pots at the side of the portraits are 
draped. In front of the flag are stars 

formed by watches and chains. The flag 
falls gracefully between the wreathed por- 
traits of Washington and Lincoln. 

The main feature of the second patri- 
otic window is the shield. The stripes 
are made of cards with links, studs, etc., 
while the stars and field are sunbursts 
on the dark covering of the window floor. 
Lorgnettes, chatelaine bags, rings and 
brooches are arranged in curved lines 
around the shield. Flags are placed in 
the background. 

SOME JEWELERS’ IDEAS. 

Some years ago, in the month of De- 
cember, a jeweler of Sydney, New South 
Wales, Australia, paid a man to collect 
a freight car full of snow in the moun- 
tains and deliver as much of it to him as 
he could. On Christmas day in the jew- 
eler’s window waj a huge snowball, rest- 
ing on a deep iron tray, and when the 
news spread about the city traffic was 
blocked for several hours until the novel 
sight had melted. Men who had not seen 
snow for 40 years, when they emigrated 
from the “old country,” hobbled out 
among the crowds and people swarmed 
and struggled to get' a glimpse of what 
they looked on as a sort of eighth wonder 
of the world. 


C. A. Whitman, Adams, Mass., has a 
novel attraction in his show window, 
which was made by himself. It is a minia- 
ture woodshed, under which is an autom- 
aton representing himself as busily en- 
gaged in sawing wood. The representa- 
tion of himself is perfect and the novelty 
attracts much attention. 


A short time since, John L. Hastings. 
Mohawk, N. Y., determined to institute 
a guessing contest, respecting the number 



ORTGINAI. SUGGESTION FOR A WASHINGTON AND LINCOLN PATRIOTIC WINDOW. 

guessing the nearest, and another fine 1 guessed the exact number, 158, and Fred, 
umbrella to the lady guessing the nearest. [ Weils, who guessed 157. 



ORIGINAL SUGGESTION FOR PATRIOTIC WINDOW FOR LINCOEN AND WASHINGTON 

BIRTHDAYS. 



THE JEWELERS’ CIRCULAR-WEEKLY. 


February 6, 1901. 


lOl’ 


BUYERS’ INFORMATION BUREAU. 


Questions as to the makers of certain lines of goods, where to buy certain lines, where certain kinds 
of work are done, the owners of certain trade-marks and other matters relating to the buying branch of 
a jewelry business will be cheerfully answered under this department. The reader cannot ask too many 
questions. All queries received are also answered promptly by mail. 


Jewelers’ Court, 


(E. D. GARNSEY, Owner', 

51 & 53 MAIDEN LANE, - ■ NEW YORK. 

Ready for occupancy April 1st, lOfll. 





This modern, twelve-story, absolutely 
fireproof business building will have solid" 
masonry floors, solid plaster partitions, 
high marble wainscotings, three high-speed 
elevators, mail chute, basins in all offices, 
electric light and everything that con- 
tributes to comfort and convenience. 

Offices of all sizes are provided and 
floors may be leased entire or in part, par- 
titioned to suit tenants. Those desiring to 
carry on light manufacturing can be ac- 
commodated, special provision being made 
for adequate power. Drop hammers will 
be located in the basement. 

Floor plans are now ready for inspection and 
leases can be arranged by communicating with 

VOORHEES & FLOYD, 

56 Liberty Street, New York. 


D. C. DE LARA 

fFormerly foreman of Ed. Van Dam), 

Gutter and Polisher 

FOR THE TRADE. 

Rough Recuiting, Repairing 
and Matching a Specialty. 

Officc and Factory: 

ROOMS 303 & 304 BEEKMAN BUILDINO, 

101 BEEKMAN STREET, 

Cor. Pearl Street, NEW YORK. 


DON’T FORGET THE lEWELERS’ CIRCULAR PUB- 
LISHING CO.’S BOOK LIST when In want of any lechnt- 
oal work In the Jewelry or Kindred Trades. 


Buffalo, N. Y., Jan. 25. 1901. 
Editor of The Jewelers’ Circular-Weekly: 
Having been referred to you by W. E. Hay- 
ward. .Attleboro, Mass., I would like to ask you 
if you could give me the names of some reliable 
firms who deal in photographic brooches. I use 
a great number of rolled plate goods and any in- 
formation on this subject will be greatly appre- 
ciated by me. Hoping to hear from you, I remain, 
Yours truly, 

Frank J. Goetz. 

.Answer: — A. E. Siviter & Co., Market 
and 5th Sts.. Pittsburgh. Pa., make such 
goods as desired, from 12 } cents to a dol- 
lar. 


Point Pleasant, W. Va., Jan. 28, 1901. 
Editor of The Jewelers’ Circular-Weekly: 

Will you kindly refer me to some responsible 
party from whom I can buy electrical supplies, 
such as wire, lamp, etc.? I would also like to put 
in my place about a 30-light (16 C. P.) plant, and 
would like to be referred to some one who can 
figure with me on this. And oblige, 

A. F. Kisar. 

-Answer: — For electrical outfits, address 
the Tovver-Binford Electric & Mfg. Co., 
Richmond, Va. For incandescent Tamps, 
address the Kentucky Electrical Co., 
Owensboro, Ky. 


Baltimore, Md., Jan. 25, 1901. 
Editor of The Jewelers’ Circular-Weekly: 

A customer of mine wishes to have the use of 
some electrotypes of chains, bracelets and different 
articles of jewelry for a small catalogue. He is 
willing to pay for the use of them. Could you 
let me know if you have any of them, or who 
might have? 

Yours, 

M. Kohner. 

Answer: — .Any manufacturer from 
whom correspondent gets jewelry illus- 
trated in their circulars or catalogues wili 
furnish electrotypes without charge for a 
catalogue. 


Wayne, Neb., Jan. 21, 1901. 
Editor of The Jewelers’ Circular-Weekly: 

I have for repairs a movement to an old floor 
clock; the pendulum ball and rod are missing, 
having been lost. \\ here can I obtain a ball and 
rod? Would like to know who can make me one. 
The clock is an old one, made in Glasgow over 
100 years ago. By answering above and giving 
me information dsked you will be conferring favor 
to. Yours truly, 

J. G. Mines. 

Answer: — If correspondent will address 
the Seth Thomas Clock Co., 144 Wabash 
Ave., Chicago, III, giving full particulars 
of what is wanted, the company probably 
will fill the want. 


Clyde, N. Y., Jan. 14, 1901. 
Editor of The Jewelers’ Circular-Weekly: 

Can you refer me to any house where I may 
be able to purchase a souvenir spoon with a 
hunting design on bowl and handle? 

Yours respectfully. 

If. E. Child. 

.Answer: — Simmons & Paye Mfg. Co., 
129 Eddy St., Providence, R. I., may have 
such a spoon or will make one. 

Chico, Cal., Jan. 9, 1901. 
Editor of The Jewelers’ Circular-Weekly: 

Can you give me any information that will help 
me to determine, with any degree of certainty, 
what are diamonds (in rough) in looking over a 
pan of gravel at the mines? W'e have a rich 
gold mine here and some fine diamonds have 
been found, but the miners, looking for gold, do 
I not hunt for the diamonds. I bought a diamond 


last Fall in rough, and after cutting, it was 
small, V 2 — 1-32 k., and a trifle yellow, but it readily 
sold for $60. 

Yours truly, 

Chas. a. Clifford. 

■Answer: — We would refer correspon- 
dent to “The Hand Book of Precious 
Stones,” by M. D. Rothschild, price $1.00, 
for sale by this company. He will find 
considerable information in it. Perhaps 
the most important test is specific 
gravity, a delicate operation undoubtedly. 
The specific gravity of diamonds is 3.5 to 
3.6. The hand book referred to tells how 
to find the specific gravity of the various 
precious stones. 


Danville. Pa., Jan. 23, 1901. 
Editor of The Jewelers’ Circular-Weekly; 

Kindly give me the New York city address ol 
Rest Fenner Smith &. Co., umbrella makers. 
Thanking you in advance, I am, 

Very respectfully, 

H. Rempe. 

Answer: — 43 Downing St., New York. 


Minneapolis, Minn.. Jan. 10, 1901. 
Editor of The Jewelers’ Circular-Weekly: 

We wish to know who makes emblem buttons 
for the Order of Eagles. The one we mean is the 
F. O. E.. and we think same is made somewhere 
in Washington, either Tacoma or Seattle. Thank- 
ing you in advance for an early answer, we re- 
main, Respectfully yours, 

Jacobs Jewelry Co. 

Answer: — We are informed that Harvey 
& Otis, Providence, R. I., are the only peo- 
ple who make these articles under the pa- 
tent of William S. Tarrant, Seattle, Wash. 
C. G. Braxmar, 10 Maiden Lane, New 
York, has a patent pending for something 
of the same kind, but he has not yet put 
the article on the market. 


Wellington, Kan., Jan. 18; 1901. 
Editor of The Jewelers’ Circular-Weekly: 
Would you kindly give the names in your next 
issue of some of the best houses in this country 
who make a specialty of selling doublets, half- 
pearls and jobbing stones in general for manu- 
facturing purposes? Greatly oblige, 

Yours very truly, 

Roser & Co. 

Answer: — Albert Lorsch & Co., 37 Mai- 
den Lane; Allen & Jonassohn, 65 Nassau 
St.; Goodfriend Bros., 13 Maiden Lane; 
Nordlinger & Mamluck, 24 John St., and 
Bruhl Bros., 68 Nassau St., all of New 
York. 


Williamsport, Pa., Jan. 21, 1901. 
Editor of The Jewelers’ Circular-Weekly: 

We have a customer who is going to have a 
silver anniversary and wants something in the way 
of a souvenir to take the place of a card at the 
table. Instead of having a card with the guest’s 
name, she would like some article of silver that 
could have the name engraved on it. Can you 
suggest some appropriate article that will not 
cost over 50 or 60 cents each? Thanking you in 
advance, we are. 

Respectfully yours, 

Diener & Co. 

Answer: — We suggest the following, 
prices of which would probably be within 
the limit mentioned, not including engrav- 
ing: Glove hook, small nail file, cold 

cream jar, court plaster case, dressing 
comb, stamp box, key ring, pencil holder 
or tie clasp. 



February 6, 1901. THE JEWELERS’ CIRCULAR-WEEKLY. 


103 








M ERCANTILE f OlNTAIN P ENS. 


NONE 

BETTER! 



I AIKIN, LAMBERT & CO., 

I 19 Maiden Lane, New York. 


Manufacturers and Exporters, 

GOLD PENS, PENCILS, Etc. 

General Agents for PAGI E. WIRT’S FOUNTAIN PENS. 




JOBBERS IN 


IMPORTERS OF 


A litllU I AMRFOT ^^kllBS, JCWBlPy, 

/\IKIN-LA^Dtlll Chains, Novelties, &c. 


JEW[LRY CO. 


LATEST DESIGNS. LOWEST PRICES. 

19 MAIDEN LANE, NEW YORK. 






G 


AliREAUD & GSISER, 

68 & 70 Nassau St., Hew York. 

LAPIDARIES. 

EMS in Unique Cuttings. 





FULTON 

TREET, 

TELEPHONE 

645-JOHM- 


WOOD ENGRAVINGS. 


fahysl4fKCases, 

WARRANTED 25 YEARS, 

have Solid Gold Bows and Joints. 
Hand Engraved. 

ORUCIBL-eS. 

Jewelers’ Supplies, 

I If Established 1860 . 

J.&H.BERGE, 

95 John Street, 

NEW YORK. 




Rings 


WM.LOEB&CO. 

101 Sabin St., 
Providence, R. I. 


JACOT MUSIC BOX CO., 

IMPORTERS, 

Stella and Ideal Music Boxes, 

39 UNION SQUARE, N. Y. 






POCKET BOOKS, 

ALL STANDARD AND FASHIONABLE LEATHERS. 

Plain and Sterling Mounted. 


ESTABLISHED 

I8S0. 


C. F. RUMPP & SONS, I 

Fine Leather Goods. 


Fifth and Cherry Streets, 
PHILADELPHIA. 


NEW YORK SALESROOM, | 
621 Broadway. 


SPECIAL LINES FOR FINE JEWELRY TRADE. 


........ 






Travelers’ Outfits. 

Let us make your TRAYS. 

They are as good as the best. 

WE GUARANTEE THEM. 


S. VALFER ^ e©.. 


Manufacturers !of Jewelry and Silverware Boxes, Trays, Chests, Etc., 

33IMAIDEN LANE, NEW YORK. 

1.^ ^ 'T' 


ALOIS KOHN & CO., ^ n « ^ n v 

’ 4 MAIDEN LANE, Near Broadway, N. Y. 


SOLID GOLD CHAINS, 

LANE, Nea 

We call the attention of the Trade throughout the country to our line of 

LOEI^iETTE AND GUARD CHAINS. 

Will send Samples on Memorandum on receipt of satisfactory reference. Correspondence 

Solicited. 


>1^ ti^ 


104 


THE JEWELERS’ CIRCULAR-WEEKLY. 


February 6, 1901. 




7 • 

e-l- ! 


r 

cl I 
1 : 


OUR IMPORT SAMPLES 


.OF.... 


'll t 

ii 

i\ 

X] 

i\ 
ii 

x\ 

it 

T? 
el. t 

M 

XI 

Xi 
Xi 


China, 6la$$ and Bric-a-Brac 


ARE NOW READY. 


Tit Ciitiogcs €bina, 


from our own factory, we call special attention to 
the large variety of 

fine Plates and €up$ and Saucers, 

in original and artistic shapes and decoratiens. 


from Our factory at Carlsbad 


we have received many interesting novelties, par- 
ticularly reproductions of the Old Dresden and 
Vienna Styles. 


Our display of 


fancy China and Pottery 


comprises collections from only the best and most 
noted factories of Europe. 


We make a specialty of 

fancy and Cable Glassware in great variety. 


Charles Ahrenfeldt & Son, 


PARIS. 


50=52-54 MURRAY STREET, NEW YORK. 
LIMOGES. CARLSBAD. LEIPZIG. 


LONDON. 


X 











TJie RAMBIER'S NOTBS 


WHAT THE RAMBLER SAW AND HEARD AMONG THE 
DEALERS IN ART POTTERY. CUT GLASS, 
BRONZES, ETC. 


\ N entirely new 

A NEW ware of Ameri- 

AMERicAN POTTERY. Gall manufacture, just 
introduced by the J. 
B. Owens Pottery Co., Zanesville, O., is 
called the “Iris,” and is not only unlike 
any line heretofore on the market but pos- 
sesses artistic features that should m-ake it 
rank with the finest American pottery. 
Like the “Utopian” ware of the same 

firm, the “Iris” has a body of blended 
colors, but instead of the dark hues of the 
former the body color of the new ware 
shows light and delicate tints of pearl 
blue, pink and similar shades. The body 
is highly glazed and is ornamented with 
fine figure work — animals, flowers or 
birds. The pieces now displayed at the 
company’s New York salesrooms, 68-70 

West Broadway, include a large number 

' of vases in various sizes and shapes. 

* 

R oyal b o n n 

and his own “A. 
A. K.” CHINA. K.” Limoges china 
are the leading lines 
among the samples offered by C. L. 
Dwenger, 35 Park Place, New York. In 
the china a large number of decorations 
are shown in standard effects, there being 
no radical departure from the finer decora- 
tions of former years. All treatments, from 
the daintiest of floral sprays to pro- 
nounced flower bands, are here to be 
found, while the prevailing Art 'Nouveau 
influence is seen in some floral borders 
and styles that ornament a full line of 
china. All the new regular lines' of 
Royal Bonn are here displayed. 


L STRAUS & 
• SONS last 
MANY WARES. week began to show 
their import samples 
for Spring, and now have on display at their 
warerooms, 42-46 Warren St., New York, 
complete lines of all the pottery, statuary, 
art goods, bronzes, china and bric-a-brac 
which they carry for the jewelry trade. In 
their own Limoges and Carlsbad china and 
Rudolstadt pottery they are showing more 
varieties and finer assortments than ever 
before; while their cut glass line was never 
larger at this season of the year than it 
is at present. 

The Rambler. 


THE CARRARA 3IARBLE IN- 
DUSTRY. 

{Continued frotn TQOr ) 

ANNUAL SHIPMENTS. 


Statistics showing the shipments of mar- 
ble for the past 10 years are given in the 
following table: 


Year. 

Total 

shipments. 

Tons. 

Total 

value. 

Declared 
value of 
shipments 
to United 
Slates. 

1890 

161,750 

$2,810,900 

$364,130 

1891 

159,455 

2,771,200 

440,401 

1892 

169,813 

2,980,000 

578,279 

1893 

144,682 

2,073,000 

691,503 

1891 

130,077 

2,135,600 

570,495 

1895 

150,018 

2,592,800 

679,128 

1896 

158,231 

2,750,000 

681,864 

1897 

157,644 

2,732,000 

627,528 

1898 

179,096 

3,062,000 

539,952 

1899 

204,813 

3,475,000 

557,234 

Total 

1,615,579 

$27,382,500 

$5,730,714 


As will be seen by the foregoing, expor- 
tations to the United States during the 
period given slightly exceed 20 per cent, 
of the total shipments. (No other country, 
with the excep'tion of Italy, is so large a 
buyer. A record of shipments by coun- 
tries is not available, but, from careful in- 
vestigation, I believe the following propor- 
tions are approximately correct: 

Per cent. 


United States 2d 

England and colonies 15 

France 13 

Germany 8 

Spain and Portugal 5 

Italy 20 

Other countries 19 

Total lOO 


SELLING PRICES AND EXPENSES OF PRODUC- 
TION. 

So much depends on color, ciuality, etc., 
of the, various marbles produced at Car- 
rara, that it is only possible to give the 
range of prices approximately. The or- 
dinary varieties are quoted from 97 cents 
to $1.60 per cubic foot f. o. b. Leghorn; 
the finer grades of statuary blocks, from 
$3.50 to $7. A variety known as “Bianco 
P,” a fine white grade without veining, the 
best of which is produced at the Massa 
quarries, sells at from $1.80 to $4. The 
finer grades of colored marbles sell as 
high as $7 per foot. 

In considering the cost to the exporter, 
many things must necessarily be taken 
into account. Location and proximity to 
transportation facilities, soundness, depth 
or thickness of the various veins, with con- 
sequent ability or inability to produce 
blocks of large size, amount of labor neces- 
sary to properly open the quarry, are all 


important factors. A fair estimate of the 
average cost of actual quarrying is, I be- 
lieve, 50 cents per cubic foot. Taking this 
as a basis, the other items of expense are 
made up of hauling charges, municipal toll, 
dressing blocks, lighterage, etc., and the 
total average cost per cubic foot f. o. b. 
Leghorn is ascertained to be about as 
follows: 

Cents. 

Hauling to Marina by quarry railroad, per 


cubic foot 11 

Municipal toll 2% 

Dressing blocks at Marina SVi 

Loading on lighters at Marina 2 

Lighterage to Leghorn 12 

Cost of quarrying 50 

Total cost per cubic foot 81 


As has been stated, the municipality 
leases the quarries for a merely nominal 
sum; it, however, exacts a toll on all block 
marble shiipped of approximately 2^ cents 
per cubic foot, and on sawed slabs at the 
rate of 7 cents per ton, or half a cent per 
cubic foot. Manufactured marble, statuary 
and the like, are exempt from this tax. 

COLORED MARBLES. 

Many varieties of colored marbles are 
also found on the mountains surrounding 
Carrara. Two varieties of blue, dove 
colored marble, known as “Bardiglio” and 
“Pavonazro,” are well known in the United 
States, the latter especially being largely 
used and commanding a high price. Some 
new and very beautiful fancy marbles have 
recently been discovered- near the villages 
of Gragnana and Castelpoggio, north of 
Carrara. In the vicinity of Castelpoggio, 
a very fine variety of red marble is quar- 
ried. Some varieties of the well known 
black-and-gold marble are found at Monte 
d’Arni and Foce, near Carrara. It is sim- 
ilar to that found at Porto Venere, in the 
Gulf of Spezia. having a densely black 
ground crossed in all directions by yellow 
veins. Besides these colored marbles, 
some fine onyx has been discovered at 
Monte d’Arni. These quarries are not 
now in active operation, it being found un- 
profitable to work them under present con- 
ditions. The merchants and exporters of 
Carrara also deal largely in the welt 
known Siena yellow marble and the various 
varieties of Numidian marbles. The lat- 
ter are brought from the quarries back of 
Oran, on the northern coast of Algeria. 

The extent of its commerce with all 
nations in its own particular line, with the 
variety, quality and beauty of its marbles, 
justly entitles Carrara to stand at the head 
of the marble-producing centers of the 
world. It has occupied this position for 
centuries and bids fair to continue to do 
so for many more to come. 


February 6, 1901. 


106 


THE JEWELERS’ CIRCULAR -WEEKLY. 



We are considered to have the mcst “unique” assort- 
ment of high-class Art Novelties shown to the trade 
this season. 

Clocks, Bronzes, 

Jeweled Photo Frames, 

Smokers’ Articles, 

Etc., Etc. 

SYDNEY J. MANBY, 

l.MPORTER OF FANCY GOODS AND ANTIQUES, 

30 East 29th St., New York. 

We issue no Catalogues. 


MEDALS IX THE COXGBES- 
SIOXAL LIBRARY, 


A mong the very many valuable collec- 
tions of art and literature do- 
nated to the Congressional Library none 
will be of more interest to the curiosity 
seeker than the collection of 50 Holland ■ 
medals presented to the library by Consul 
Newell, at present located at The Hague. 
These medals are all, with one exception, 
of bronze, and vary in size from 1x1 inch 
to 3ix3i, with two plaquettes' still larger, 
the dates ranging from 1884 to 1900. 

The collection of Wilhclmina medals is 
perhaps most interesting at the present 
time, although they, with one or two ex- 
ceptions, are not the best from the point 
of workmanship. One of these, the inau- 
guration medal, represents a very young 
child, bust, face in profile, 2x2 inches, the 
reverse side showing a laurel wreath in 
relief on a perfectly plain background. 
Another of these Wilhelmina medals is 
one that was presented by Her Majesty 
to the officials of the palaces and the cas- 
tles, at the time of the inauguration; it is 
UxlJ, carries on its face profiles of the 
Queen and Queen-Regent, both very clear- 
ly cut; the reverse side is one of the pret- 
tiest of the collection, showing at the 





-f 

4 - 


4 - 

4 - 

4 - 


It Will Pay. 






PLACE YOUR ORDERS FOR NEXT 

FALL DELIVERY AND DON’T WAIT TO 
PURCHASE FROM STOCK. ^ 


IMPORT ORDERS A SPECIALTY . 

CHARLES L. DWENGER, 


Importer.... 


35 Park Place, New York. 


A SPLENDID LINE OF 

Artistic Pottery, China and Glassware 

FOR THE JEWELRY TRADE. 


4 - 

4 - 

4 

4 - 

4 

4 - 

4^ 


t 

t 


4 - 

> 

4 

>4 


Pairpoint Corporation 

AND 

Mt. Washington Glass Co., 

NEW BEDFORD, MASS. 



PATENTED. 


Silver 

Plafe. 


Rich 

€ut 6la$$ 


♦ 


38 Murray St., New York City. Temple Building, Montreal. 


lower part of the medal a crown, mace 
and sword lying on a cushion, from the 
back of which spreads a wreath of laurel 
over the upper part of the medal. An- 
other, commemorative of a visit of Wil- 
helmina to the Province of Limburg, in 
1895, bears a profile of a girl of 15; on the 
reverse is a shield bearing the royal coat 
of arms on a plain background. A plain 
engraved coin medal is not worthy of spe- 
cial mention, as the features of the Queen 
are very indistinct. One of the largest 
and heaviest of the Wilhelmina collection 
is a medal of Her Majesty, bearing date 
of 1890; on the face is a profile of a girl 
of 10 years of age; the flowing hair and 
the features are particularly well worked 
out. The reverse side is very elaborately 
carved in an inscription and flowers, all 
in relief. There is also a portrait medal, 
at about 15 years of age, and a medal of- 
fered to newspaper correspondents on the 
occasion of the inauguration bears a female 
figure clad in armor and wearing a helmet, 
with an appropriate inscription on the re- 
verse side. Some very fine heraldic work 
is shown on a medal commemorative of 
the 14th anniversary of the Queen, held 
in Antwerp in 1894. 

The collection contains two plaquettes; 
one offered by the city of Amsterdam, on 
the occasion of the inauguration of the 
Queen, in 1898, is 2^x4. The design rep- 
resents in the background the front of the 
cathedral, in front of which lies an 
immense lion, and on the left a female 
figure holding aloft a palm and surround- 
ed by anchors and chains is very clear, 
but is very slightly raised. The back of 
this plaquette is perfectly plain. The other 
is commemorative of the regency of Her 
Majesty Queen Emma. It is 2Jx3J inches. 
The designing is divided into two halves, 
upper and lower; in the lower half is a rep- 
resentation of the palace, with a seated 
female figure on the right and a standing 
one on the left, the standing one holding 
up on the upper half a medallion portrait 
of the Queen, the upper corners being filled 
in with two cherub figures, the whole being 
surmounted by a scroll, in the center of 
which is a crown, and on the ends of the 
scroll the dates 1890-1898. The reverse 
side carries a suitable inscription. 

There are 10 medals offered at different 
times by the Riflemen’s Association, and 
while all are small, Hxl}, the work on 
many of them is particularly fine. In one 
is a very fine piece of work, in a ruff 
around a profile head, similar to those 
worn in the time of Elizabeth; another 
shows a flying figure of Victory, passing 
over a hunter in Dutch costume, wading 
through a marsh. The smallest detail in 
all these medals is perfect, and in the one 
for 1897 is shown a very fine figure of a- 
huntsman on one knee, finger on th& trig- 
ger, with gun raised ready to shoot. The 
detail work in this is excellent. 

In the collection are several exhi- 
bition medals, among them being the Safe- 
ty Exhibition of 1890, representing a female 
figure, with wings outstretched, protecting 
the kneeling figures of a miner and a black- 
smith, both typical of labor. The Batavia 
Exhibition medal of 1893 bears a female 
figure, representing Success, flying over the 
city. The detail work on this medal is 
so perfectly done that it reminds one of 




I 


February 6, 1901. 


THE JEWELERS’ CIRCULAR-WEEKLY. 


107 




NOVELTIES, 1901. 

Electric Bronzes. 


LARGE ASSORTMENT OF 

Figures, Groups, 

Wall Brackets and 

Hanging Fixtures, 

carrying from J to 18 lights. 

9 

Busts, Eigures and Groups, 

IN ART AND REAL BRONZE. 

ROYAL VIENNA, SEVRES 

AND OTHER 

ARTISTIC PORCELAINS. 


KAYSER ZINN 

Gilt Regulators, 

Traveling Clocks, 

Clock Sets, 

Hall and Mantle Chime Clocks. 

THE LARGEST ASSORTMENT 
OF NOVELTIES FOR JEWELERS, 
SUITABLE FOR EASTER AND 
SPRING TRADE, NOW ON EX- 
HIBITION. 


GtAtNZfR EnCRtS 

& Rheinboldt, 

26-28 Washington Place, New York. 











lOS 


THE JEWELERS’ CIRCULAR-WEEKLY. 


February 6, 1901. 


■ 


t 




•4*V 



4- 

•i* 

•5* 

-i* 

•J* 

-i* 

•i* 

4 * 

4 * 

4 < 

4 “ 


OLDEST AND BEST. 

Factory Founded in 1797. 

THE “G, D, A,” LIMOGES CHINA 

IS NOW MARKED 


yoo. 


G DA 


yoG 


OUR IMPORT SAMPLES FOR 1901 ARE READY. 

Dinner, Soup, Dessert and Fruit Plates. After Dinner, Tea, Chocolate and Bouillon Cups and Saucers, 
Ice Cream, Game, Fish, Roast and Meat Sets. Bonbon Boxes, Brush and Comb Trays, Olive, Almond, 
Cake and Celery Dishes. Chocolate and Coffee Pots, Biscuit Jars, etc., etc. 

All to be seen in a variety of decorations rich in effect but moderate in cost. 


ESPECIAT.LV ADAPTED TO THE NEEDS OF JEWELERS. 


A p'.’rsonal visit is urged, or our travelers would be pleased to call upon you if desired. 

BOOK OF ILLUSTRATIONS ON APPLICATION. 


4*1 
4*1 
4 », 
•S': 
4 *’ 
4>1 
4*' 
4 -. 
4 «. 
4 *. 
4 - 
4 * 
4 *’ 
4 - 
4 - 
4 * 

4 - 
4 * 
4 *: 
4 *' 
4 *. 
4 - 
4 - 
4 * 
4 * 

4 * 

4 * 
4 *’ 
4 >, 
4 * 

4 * 
4 * 
4 * 
4 * 
4 * 
4 * 
4 * 
4 * 
4 * 
4*. 
4 *. 
4 * 
4 * 
4 *.'! 

4 * 
4 * 
4 * 
4 * 
4 - 
4 * 
4 * 
4 * 
4 » 
4 * 
4 * 
4 * 
4 * 
4 * 
4 - 
4 * 
4 * 
4 * 
4 * 
4 * 
4 * 
4 * 
4 * 
4 > 
4 * 
4 - 
4 * 
4 * 
4 * 
4 * 
4 - 
4 - 
4 * 
4 * 
4 > 
4 > 
4 * 
4 * 
4 * 
4 * 
4 * 
4 * 
4 - 
4 » 
4 * 
4 * 
4 « 
4 - 
4 - 
4 * 
4 * 
4 * 
4 * 
4 * 
4 * 
4 * 
4 * 

Ghr.ari), Dufraisseix & Abbot, I 

29 BARCLAY STREET, NEW YORK. I 

’ 4 - 

4 « 


February 6, 1901. 


THE JEWELERS’ CIRCULAR-WEEKLY. 


109 


the veiled statue, the limbs showing per- 
■ectly through a gossamer drapery.' An- 
Dther, showing very fine work, fully equal 
:o any done in marble, is the Fishery Ex- 
libition medal of 1892, 2x2 inches, bearing 
i figure of a fishwife, whose features, hair 
ind poke bonnet are perfect. The reverse 
side shows a relief composed of various 
ishing utensils used in Holland. There 
s also a fine Paris Exposition medal by 
leorges Lemaire. The Exhibition medal 
)f Dordrecht, 1897, 3^x3^, is in German 
silver, and shows in the foreground two 
igures, one of an old Dutch burgher ex- 
ending the hand of friendship to a mod- 
ern man; in the background are repre- 
leiitations of old Dutch vessels. Among 
he most notable medals of the entire col- 
ection is the Baker medal of 1896, not 
>nly for the fine carving on the face in the 
^■riffins bearing a shield, but more espe- 
ially for the fine detail work displayed in 
. wreath of cornflowers, poppies and 
rheat on the reverse, which seem only 
o need color to have life. Among other 
xhibition medals in the collection is the 
'fimrod medal for 1898, and another of 
899, both showing hunting dog heads and 
unting equipment. And along with these 
ne must not forget the Shooting Society 
aedal of “Bogardus”; the diameter of the 
aedal is only 1|- inches, yet in this small 
pace is a perfect forest scene, with horse, 
logs and man in the foreground, a deer 
tanding among the trees on a slight ele- 
ation and a castle on a hilltop in the dis- 
ance, all clear, even to the leaves on the 
rees. 

Especially fine detail work is seen on the 


Exchange medal of Utrecht, 3^xlJ, repre- 
senting the buildings in fine relief; the Sail- 
ing Society medal of Holland. Souvenir 
medal of the King of Bohemia, 1896; 50th 
anniversary of the Polytechnic School at 
Delft, 1898; Life Insurance of Utrecht; Ac- 
tive Charity Society, Amsterdam; Sport- 
ing Terrance medal, a Capella Koor; the 
Limburgia Society, 1888; Society of Art 
and Friendship, of Rotterdam; 20th anni- 
versary of the establishment of the S. S. 
Company,* Nederland, and in addition to 
all of these one must not forget other 
splendid portrait works, as shown in a 
medal commemorative of the death of Wil- 
liam HI.; Prof. Asser, the well known 
sculptor; another William HI., in military 
uniform; a portrait bust of C. H. Backer, 
one of the Grand Duke of Luxemburg, on 
his accession to the throne; Dr. Wm. 
Julius; profile of William HI., on his 70th 
anniversary, some of this work being mod- 
eled by the celebrated artist, L. Jiinger. 

Among the peculiar medals of the col- 
lection may be noted that of the Universi- 
ty of Utrecht, in 1894, in which the very 
odd conceit is displayed of depicting the 
entire college buildings from an altitude, 
so that the roof outline of the buildings is 
given, and done so perfectly that one feels 
that he might almost be looking at a 
photograph taken in the same position; 
another variation is an oval medal, Rx2|, 
issued by an association to favor the vis- 
iting of strangers to Nymeger; in the fore- 
ground is a castle battlement, bearing on 
the wall the coat of arms of the city and 
a crown. An oblong, l|x2|, inviting 
strangers to Haarlem, shows a drawbridge 


over a moat to a castle in the background, 
all very clearly defined and in relief. There 
is also a small medal of a similar design. 

These medals are all the work of C. J. 
Begeer, a silversmith of Utrecht. 


Theus Bros., Savannah, Ga., designed 
and executed the handsome loving 
cup presented to Col. A. R. Lawton, 
on Jan. 19. The cup is of silver, lined 
with gold, is nine inches high and eight 
inches in diameter, with three handles 
representing a grape vine; a band of grape 
vine, leaves and grapes in high relief, en- 
circles the cup near the rim; the handles 
and ornamentations are in French gray fin- 
ish; the cup is highly polished and bears the 
following engraving on the first panel: 
“1894-1900, Testimonial of Esteem to Col. 
Alexander Rudolph Lawton, from First 
Regiment Infantry, Georgia State Troops, 
Jan, 19, 1900”; on the second panel, “Field 
and Staff First Battalion, Co. H, German 
Volunteers; Co. I, Oglethorpe Light In- 
fantry; Co. K, Savannah Cadets; Co. L, 
Irish Jasper Greens; Co. M, Republican 
Blues”; on the third panel, “Second Bat- 
talion, Co. A, Savannah Volunteer Guard; 
Co. B, Savannah Volunteer Guard; Co. 
C, Savannah Volunteer Guard; Co. D, 
Savannah Volunteer Guard; Third Bat- 
talion, Co. E, Burke Light Infantry; Co. 
F, Kell Rifles; Co. G, Brunswick Rifle- 
men.” Theus Bros, have on exhibition in 
their window the first and second contri- 
butions to a proposed free library in Sa- 
vannah, Ga., consisting of a dime and a 
check for $1; both gifts are in gilt frames. 



OFFICE AND SALESROOMS, 38 MURRAY STREET, NEW YORK. 

Realizing that the demand to-day is for 


FACTORY, MERIDEN, CONN. 



PopuIar*Priced Goods, 

we have bent every energy toward producing 

American Cut Glass 


No. 350. Qt. Car^ttc, JNewport.’ 



that will meet this requirement. 


No. 306. Bonbon, “Lotus.” 


To accomplish this end we have taken advantage of every money-sav- 
^ng innovation possible, reducing expenses lo a minimum ; BUT have 
not resorted to cheap and inferior blanks, as is often the case. 


THE.: BLANKS] WE USE are PERFECT IN COLOR. 
The finish on our goods is BRILLIANT and LASTING. 
They are sold at POPULAR PRICES. These facts should 
convince you that BERGEN CUT GLASS will prove a 
MONEY MAKER for you. 

Send for Catalogue 15. 

Electros Furnished Free for Advertising. 



Flower Centre, “Glenwood.” Made in 8, 10 and 12 inch sizes. 

THE J. D. BERGEN GO., 38 MURRAY STREET, New York. 


110 


THE JEWELERS' CIRCULAR-WEEKLY. 


February 6, 1901. 


Openiog and Closing the Holy Door. 


T he most interesting ceremony of the 
Roman Catholic Church at the clos- 
ing year of a century — the opening and 



closing of the Holy Door of St. Peter’s 
Cathedral, at Rome — is the occasion for 
the use of two magnificent tools of solid 
gold, a hammer and a trowel, handsomely 
embossed and etched, made especially for 
this purpose. The opening ceremony was 
witnessed a year ago, and the closing took 


I place on Christmas Eve. The ceremony 
j of opening the Holy Door is declared to 
I be symbolical of the fact that the Church 
is open to all men so long as they go there 
after a thorough and sincere conversion. 

The Pope, who is seated on a raised 
throne in front of the large door in the 
middle of the grand portico, remains 
stationary for a brief while, until the 
Prince of the Throne presents to His 
Holiness the golden hammer here illus- 
trated. This the Pope takes in his right 
hand, and, rising from his throne, goes 
and knocks at the Holy Door. His clergy 
follow him, each with a candle in his hand. 
His Holiness, after knocking three times 
at the door, saj's in Latin: “Open to me 

these doors of justice!” Then the choir 
adds: “This is the door of the Eternal 

One, and the just will enter in,” etc. 

The three knocks which he gives are 
said to represent the three continents — 
Europe, Africa and Asia — to which the 
Pope offers the treasures which he is the 
medium fpr dispensing. The three strokes 
also are looked upon as symbolizing the 
joy that the jubilee causes to the faithful 
of Heaven, Earth and Purgatory. 

The closing of the door is a very similar" 
ceremony to the opening, and at this the 
trowel is used. The greatest solemnity is 
observed, and thousands of privileged 
pilgrims flock to the cathedral to be wit- 
nesses. His Holiness, taking the trowel, 
i lays the first brick for the closing of the 
door, all the Cardinals, Monsignors and 
other dignitaries in Rome being witnesses 
of the operation. The bricks used for 
this purpose are about double the ordinary 


THE IMPROVED CABINET WALL CASE... 

Lifting: door entirely concealed, 
insuring: maximum space 
of display and beauty 
in design. 

PATENT PENDING. 

John A. Bank & Bro., 

Cabinet IDaRcrs in 
Tine Tixtures, etc., 

334-336 East 23d St., NEW YORK. 



size, being covered with a thin layer of 
plate — in some cases of silver and in others 



GOLDEN TROWEL, 

WITH WHICH THE POPE LAYS THE FIRST BRICK WHEN 
THE HOLY DOOR IS CLOSED WITH MASONRY. 


of gold. They bear in relief the Papa 
arms and the inscription: “Leo XIII 
Pont. Max. Aperuit et clausit.” Thi 
drawings from which the engravings o 
the hammer and trowel were made wen 
kindly loaned to this journal by the Nev 
York Tribune. 


ERNEST VATIER, 

FOUNDER IN 

Gold, Silver 

and 

Bronze d’Art. 

Maker of 

FINE CASTINGS 

For Silversmiths and Jeweiers. 

Specialty of Solid Gold Cast 
Rings, Charms, Scarf Pins, etc. 

312 MARKET STREET, NEWARK, N.J 

Bell Telephone, No. 6542. 



I 

♦ 

♦ 

♦ 

♦ 

\ 


OUR LINE OF 

NEW AND SALABLE DESIGNS IN 


Gold Rings, Brooches, Studs, Scarf Pins, 
Stick Pins, Screw Ear Drops, Heart 
Charms, Baby Pins and Eye-Glass Chains 
is ready for your inspection. 

E. L. SPENCER & CO., 

53 Aborn Street, 

New York Office: 

9-11-13 Malden Lane. PROVIDENCE, R. I. 


▼ 

I 


KLEIN BROTHERS, 

Diamond Setters, Engraver: 

AND CHASERS, 

0-13 Maiden Lane, Room 1308, New York 


THE ATTLEBORO CHAIN CO 

MANUFACTURERS OF AN 

Improved Machine Chain, 

ATTLEBORO, MASS. 

DON’T FORGET THE JEWELERS’ CIRCULAR PU 
lISHING CO.’S BOOK LIST when In want of tny techi 
cal wont In the Jewelry or Kindred Trades. 




February G, 1901. 


THE JEWELERS’ CIRCULAR-WEEKLY. 


Ill 










SELLING IN LARGE QUANTITIES. 

“ It’s Simply Perfect,” writes Madame Bkrnhardt. 

This is indeed a remarkable tribute from the most remarkable lady in Americi. 


Sarah Bernhardt 


CHAIN BRACELET. 



i- 


These bracelets are made of High-Grade Rolled Plate and Sterling Silver wire. Guaranteed to give the wearer satisfaction. 

We make a full line of I'nnoliti, riiinntinn H In 10k. Gold, High-Grade Rolled Plate, 

CHAIN BRACELE.TS. Qliallty BfiyOIld yUSStlOlli Gold-Filled and sterling Silver. 

NEJW YORK OFFICE, 
II John Street. 


TRADH “Quality Beyond Question.” 

PROVIDENCE STOCK CO., 


WE SELL THE 
WHOLESALE TRADE OHLV. 


100 to 106 Stewart Street, 
Providence, R.. I. 


CHICAGO OFFICE, 
131 Wabash Avenue. 











Established 1867. 

GEO. E. HOOPER, 

Jewelers’ Auctioneer, 

22 Hanover Street, also 
CASH PAID FOR Room 83, Jewelers’ Building, 
•locKS IN STORES. BOSTON. 


j T!!i BASSETT JEWELRY CO., | 

I Fine QoId°FilIed Chains, I 

I Lockets and Gold Jewelry, | 

I PROVIDENCE, R. I. T 

S » 

I ROLLED PLATED GDDDS { 

\ OF EXTRA QUALITY. j 

! SILK-MOUNTED VESTS, FOBS, BUTTONS, t 

1 Walter E. Hayward, Attleboro, Mass. I 

1 ? 



144 PINE ST., PROVIDENCE, R. I. 


Plated Seamless Wire 
and Aluminum Solder. 


These well-known Razors, the quality of which is 
warranted, possess this great advantage, that they 
may be used for ten years before they require ac- 
tual sharpening. Before using them it is necessary 
to rub them on good leather strop. Le Coultre’s 
Strops (to be had with the Razors) should be used 
in preference to others. 


DS 


“ SPECIAL” — Single Razors for Jewelers’ Travelers at trade price. 

MATHEY BROS.,M ATHEZ & CO. 

Send for Price List. Sale Agents, 21 & 23 MAIDEN LANE, N. Y. 





ALLEN & JONASSOHN, 


IMPORTERS AND 
CUTTERS OF 


DIAMONDS. 


NEW YORK, 65 NASSAU ST. PROVIDENCE, R. I., 212 UNION ST. PARIS, 58 RUE DE TURBIGO. Precious and Imitation Stones. 


R., L & M. FRIEDLANDER, 


Wholesale Jewelers, 


Importers of Diamonds, 


30 Maiden Lane, NEW YORK CITY. 



L. LELONG & BRO., 


Gold and Silver Refiners, Assayers and Sweep Smelters, 


S. W. Cor. Halsey and Marshall Sts., NEWARK, N. J. 

Prompt attention g^iven to Gold and Silver Bullion. 

SMELTING FOR THE TRADE. 



Hall Clocks. 


Celebrated 
TJubular Chimes, 


Harris & 


Harrington, 


32 & 34 VESEY ST., 
NEW YORK. 


Sole Agents to the Trade for 
J. J. BLLIOTT & CO., 
i I.ONDON. 


LEO GOLDSMITH, 


Importer of Diamonds 
and Precious Stones, 

9-13 MAIDEN LANE, NEW YORK 

RUBIES. 


ALEXANDER H. REVELL & CO., 


431 to 437 FIFTH AVENUE, 
CHICAGO. 


253 BROADWAY, 


NEW YORK. 



We make a Patented \LL GLASS 
Counter Cas;\ 

The latest and best in the market 


Ttie latest improved Dust-Tight 
Counter Cases. 


FIXTURES FITTED FOR 
ELECTRIC lighting 

IF DESIRED. 

Give Us a 



Latest improved Dust-Tight Wall Cases and 
all kinds of Jewelers’ Fixture.- 


• i 

♦ ’ 

Ac 

4( 

« 

♦ 

4c 

4c 

4t 

4c 

«r 

4' 


LOUIS KAHN. 


MOSES KAHN. 



NEW YORK: 172 Broadway. 


Importers and Cutters of 

DIAMONDS. 

CUTTINQ WORKS; Cor. Beekman and Pearl Sts. 




Factories: 

Factories: A IV I Kobe. Japan. 

Vienna, Austria 1“ |\l East Braintree, 

Paris, Franck. I g\ I w Mass. 

Especially made for the Jewelry Trade In our 
various factories: 

MOTHER OF PEARL, 

IVORY, TORTOISE SHELL, 

ENGRAVED EBONY and BONE, 

WITH 

ARTISTIC PAINTINGS by the Best Artists. 
Mounted with fine Hand-made Lace. 


HENRY 

HENRY 

HENRY 

HENRY 

HENRY 


E. OPPENHEIMER & 
E. OPPENHEIMER & 
E. OPPENHEIMER & 
E. OPPENHEIMER & 
E. OPPENHEIMER & 


CO., SAPPHIRES. 
CO., SAPPHIRES. 
CO., SAPPHIRES. 
CO., SAPPHIRES. 
CO., SAPPHIRES. 




IGNAZ STRAUSS & CG 


OFFICE: 621 BROADWAY, NEW YORK. 



IS OUR GUARANTEE OF SATISFACTION 
TO ALL OUR CUSTOMERS. 


WE DO OUR OWN SMELTING. 


JOHN AUSTIN & SON, 

Assayers, Refiners and Smelters, 

74 & 76 Clifford Street, PROVIDENCE, R. I. 


ALBERT LORSCH. 


lelephuue Call, 2142 John. 


ALFRED KROWER 


LORSCH BUILDING, 37 and 39 MAIDEN LANE, NEW YORK. 


167 WEYBOSSET STREET, PROYIDENCE, R. I. 


DIAMONDS. ROSE DIAMONDS, 

PEARLS, OPALS. SAPPHIRES. RUBIES. EMERALDS, &c. 




ir 


:v 




f4i 

£ 


39 YEARS OF HONEST RETURNS 


niN 


established 1869. 


INDEX TO ADVERTISEMENTS, PAGE 38. 



the Co. Corbin Building, 11 John St., Corner Broadway, New York, ^"‘rew YorC n" Offi 


32d Year. 


NEW YORK, WEDNESDAY, FEBRUARY 13, 1901. 


VoL. XLII. No. 2. 


TH® JEWELS OE THE NEW QUEEN OE ENGLAND. 


\T^HEN the present Queen Alexandra 
went to England as a bride her 
father and mother were not King and 
Queen of Denmark,, though 
there was every prospect 
that they would be so in 
course of time; and. in 
point of fact, a very short 
period elapsed after their 
eldest daughter’s marriage 
before the expected acces- 
sion took place. They were 
anything but rich, and their 
children were literally ac- 
customed to plain living 
and high thinking, the 
young princesses, when 
emancipated from lessons, 
helping their good mother, 
and stitching for them- 
selves even more than the 
daughters of the average 
English country gentleman 
of that day. Consequently, 
it was hardly to be expect- 
ed that Princess Alexan- 
dra’s jewel case was very 
well filled before her mar- 
riage. and this was an un- 
spoken but generally rec- 
ognized reason why prec- 
ious stones figured largely 
among her wedding pres- 
ents, She is, moreover, 
fond of jewels, and knows 
that diamonds and pearls 
are peculiarly suitable to 
her special style of grace 
and beauty: but innate 

.good taste leads her to 
avoid bijouterie that is al- 
most barbaric in its gor- 
geousness and that is worn 
in all its splendor by 
some of the fashionable 
women of the period. 

To Princess Alexandra, as to all her 
other daughters and daughters-in-law in 
earlier days. Queen Victoria gave a splendid 


parurc of opals and diamonds. Her Majes- 
ty was very fond of opals, and in spite of the 
ancient superstition about their being un- 


lucky, it cannot be said that her children 
have had more than the ordinary share of 
the changes and chances of this mortal 


life. Bereavement comes to every family 
under the sun, bnt from bitter and heart- 
rending sorrows such as have pursued the 
Austrian and Spanish Royal 
races, the English has been 
comparatively free. 

A magnificent pearl and 
diamond necklace which 
the Princess frequently 
wears was one of her hus- 
band’s first presents. It 
consists of circular clusters 
of diamonds with a large 
pearl in the center of each, 
and they are connected by 
festoons of diamonds. A 
large pear shaped pearl of 
the finest quality forms a 
pendant from each of the 
three principal clusters. 
These can be taken apart 
and worn in various forms, 
each being a perfect orna- 
ment in itself. 

Of je.weled crosses the 
Princess has several, but, 
perhaps, the one she prizes 
most highly is Queen Dag- 
mar’s cross, which is an ex- 
act replica of one that was 
made for a Queen Dagmar 
late in the 12th or early in 
the 13th century, and has 
been an heirloom in the 
Danish Royal family ever 
since. The original con- 
tains relics of Canute, the 
patron saint of Denmark, 
and is inscribed with the 
name of the Queen it was 
made for, whose memory 
is kept green, not only on 
account of her traditional 
virtues, but by at least one 
girl of every generation of 
her descendants bearing 
her name. The Princess Dagmar, who 
was the Princess of Wales’s next and fa- 
vorite sister, is the Czarina Dowager of 



THE NEW QUEEN WEARING HER JEWELS. 


February 13, 1901. 


THE JEWELERS’ CIRCULAR-WEEKLY. 










Theodore W. Foster & Bro. Co. 

HAVE BEEN MAKERS OF ROLLED-GOLD PLATED JEWELRY FOR THIRTY 
YEARS, AND EACH YEAR, HAVE ADDED TO THEIR 
HIGH REPUTATION. 

VEST CHAINS FOR GENTLEMEN 

made by them will wear ten years and are so guaranteed See the F & B Trade-Mark. 

LOCKETS and CHARMS 

from their factory have a reputation equaled by no others. Order some of their latest 
patterns to tone up your stock. They are beautiful beyond description. They bear the 
F & B Trade-Mark. 

SLEEVE BUTTONS 

in the Dumbbell variety are exquisite. Be sure to see them; better still, order some. 
You will sell them quick. Look for the F & B Trade-Mark. 

Fob Chains and Charms, Silk Vests, Hair Chain Mountings, Brooches, Pins 

T rade- 

and Earrings are made by them; also seven complete lines of Sterling Silver Mark 

Toilet and Manicure goods, and useful Sterling Novelties. |)«t>sTtRu 


SUCCESSORS TO 
FOSTER & BAILEY. 


100 Richmond St., Providence, R. I. 



HENRY REINEWALD, 

pineWatch Repairing 

TO THE TRADE, 

14 Maiden Lane, - New York. 


SKILLFUL REPAIRER. 

All kinds of jewelry repairing for the trade 
at satisfactory prices. 

New mountings, resetting, aiso new order work 
promptly attended to. A specialty made of Badges. 
Medals, etc. Twenty-five years’ experience. 

C. PONZONI, 16 Maiden Lane,NewYork. 


Horological Department, 

BRADLEY POLYTECHNIC INSTITUTE, 

PEORIA, ILLINOIS. 

Largest and Best AVateh School in America. 

We teach Watch Work, Jewelry, Engraving. Clock Work, 
O itics. (Formerly Parsons’ Horological Institute.) 

Tuition reasonable. Board and rooms near schcol at moder* 
ite rates, f©,. Catalogue of Information. 


KENT a WOODLAND, 

SUCCESSORS TO 

WM. H. BALL & CO., 

”‘.T' GOLD BRACELETS 

16 John Street, New York. 


fRESli WATER PEARLS 

BOUGHT AND SOUD. 
Also PEARLS POLISHED 

and all possible improvements made. 
Pearls damaged by setting restored. 

lOHN HAACkT R«x>“ 

UV/lllY I ,, John St., New York. 

Office Hours: 1 to i 


4 


February 13, 1901. 


THE JEWELERS’ CIRCULAR-WEEKLY. 


♦ 


Lancaster Watch Material 


It is a fact that we are in a better position to furnish 
the watchmaker more promptly than any other jobber in 
the United States with the following material: Lancaster, 
Aurora and Hamilton. We are right at the seat of opera- 
tion. We have the largest and only stock of Lancaster 
watch material in America. We can fill your order for 

Waltham, Elgin, Hampden, New England, Colum= 
bus, Illinois, Rockford, Seth Thomas, Howard, 

Century, Trenton, New York Standard and Swiss 

as quickly as any house in this country. 

We Never Sell Imitation Material tor Genuine. 

We have a special made balance staff and a special 
mounted hole jewel. We can furnish you with these bal- 
ance staffs for all of the above-named watches for $18.00 
per gross. Every mounted jewel is cemented and trued 
and we sell them for $7.50 to $12.00 per gross, less 
10 per cent, for cash. 

Give us a trial at your mail business and we will dem- 
onstrate our promptness. 


L. C. REISNER & CO., 

Importers, Exporters, Manufacturers and Jobbers, 
Watchmakers’ Tools, Material and Supplies, 

11 W. Chestnut St., Lancaster, Pa. Ill S. Eighth St., Phila., Pa. 








"Rings. 


THE JEWELERS’ CIRCULAR-WEEKLY. February 13, 1901, 


Best Bnamel ImitationTurquoise 
Stones in 10k. Rings. 



No. 90S, $1.50. No. 906, $2.00. No. 907, $3.00. No. 908, $3.50. No. 909, $4.00. 


Men’s Gypsy 10k. Rings, 
$1.60 per dwt. 

Doublet or Imitation Uurquoise Stones. ii 

These rings are struck out by steel dies and are made the ' 
same way as we make onr Tiffany mountings. I 

/til other such rings, when sold at near our prices, are only j, 
cast rings. 







No. 910, $3.74. 

No. 911, $5.20. 

No. 912, $5.20. 

No. 913, $5.34. 

No. 914, $6.00. 1 


I 

I 

These prices are list and subject to onr regular book | 
discount. ! 

TVe show these rings as samples, to let yon see what we can \ 
do in this kind of rings. | 

They are taken from onr igoi book, which will be ready ‘ 
around March loth. ' 


Plain Solid Gold Rings, Ladies’ Stone Rings, 
Ln graved Rings, Mountings, 

Chains. 

Diamond Cutters. 

J. R. WOOD & SONS, 

21 Maiden Lane, 


f^ElV YORK. 




February 13, 1901. 


THE JEWELERS’ CIRCULAR-WEEKLY. 










The Real Rogers. 

Not in the Trust. 


LOOK FOR THESE TRADE-MARKS WITH THE MALTESE CROSS. 


lf\ M 


ROGERS 


[A H 

R. 


^ S.U&Q.H.RoqersCo. 


THE EQUAL OF ANY PLATED WARE ON THE MARKET. 

Prices this year will undoubtedly be the lowest in the history of the 
trade. Place no large stock orders until you get our quotations. 

Protect yourself from a rapid decline of prices by ordering only such 
goods as you stand in immediate need of. 

Our competitors, who have been steadily raising prices, have suddenly 
made two heavy cuts in prices on the eve of the opening of this plant. 
This is only the beginning of the battle and we think it will pay you 
to wait for us. 


The Simeon L. & Geo. H. Rogers Co. 


HARTFORD, CONN. 


P. O. BOX 1205. 


Factories- ' HARTFORD, CONN. 

' WALLINGFORD. CONN. 








Ti 4i 4i 44 44 4* i|i 4i 4* 4^ 4^ 4^ 


^ 4 ^ 4 ^ 4 ^ 4 ^ 4 ^ 4 ^ 4 ^ 4 ^ 4 ^ 4 ^ 4 ^ 4 ^ 4 ^ 4 ^ 44 44 ^ 44 4 ^ 4 ^ 4 ^ 4 ^ 4 ^ 4 ^ 4 ^ ^ ^ ^ 


THE JEWELERS’ CIRCULAR-WEEKLY. 


February 13, 1901. 


(.! 


A NEW DEPARTIRE 


/CRESCENT CASES have always contained more fine gold and given better 
service than any other. 

But there is a demand for a higher=priced case, and so, in addition 
to our regular line (whose high quality will be strictly maintained), we have 
now read}^ a case that contains about twice as much gold as any filled case 
made. Extra care has been taken in the finish and everjr detail has had the 
most minute attention. It is, as we have tried to make it, 


The crescent WATCH CASE CO. 


IN THE MANUFACTURE OF 




Watch 


Cases. 


AN EDITION DE LUXE 



of our regular work. We know that every jeweler will 
appreciate the desirability of handling these new cases, 
and the added satisfaction which they must 


give to customers, as they contain more 
gold and will wear longer and look better 

than many solid gold cases. 



SAMPLES AND PRICE=LISTS 
FROM THE JOBBING TRADE. 


NEW YORK. CHICAGO. BOSTON. SAN FRANCISCO. 


February 13, 1901. 


THE JEWELERS’ CIRCULAR-WEEKLY. 


Russia, and merged the appellations given 
her by her godfather and godmother at 
the font in those of Marie Feodorovna 
when she was married. 

The Prince of Wales, on their silver 
wedding day, gave the Princess a large 
ruby and diamond cross, and it was a 


band lay between life and death in the 
grip of typhoid. A lovely diamond cross 
on a string of pearls was a wedding pres- 
ent from the ladies of Liverpool, and there 
was something unitiue and old-world 
about the combination. 

Her Royal Highness also has some very 


naments of old Saxon design, sent her by 
the inhabitants of the remote islands of 
Laaland and Falster. They are items not 
generally included in the ordinary modern 
set of jewelry, and comprise rings, hair- 
pins, three buttons, earrings, an armlet, a 
brooch and a diadem. 




QUEES DAGMAr’s CROSS (OBVERSE AND REVERSE . 

SOME JEWELS OF THE NEW QUEEN OF ENGLAND. 



more eloquent and sympathetic gift than- 
any ornament. A woman does not live as 
a wife for five and 20 years without 
suffering, however dear her husband and 
children may be, and the Princess of 
Wales during that period had lost a babe, 
the infant Prince John, experienced a long 
illness in 1867, and watched and hoped 
and feared, day after day, through that ter- 
rible time at Sandringham, when her hus- 


fine Indian jewelry which, considered as a 
whole, sounds overwhelming, though the 
individual pieces are exquisitely beautiful. 
There is a kind of corselet, a pair of brace- 
lets and an armlet in one set, all in the 
finest wrought and chased gold and jew- 
eled with pearls, rubies and diamonds, each 
of which is immensely valuable. Very 
quaint indeed and highly prized by the 
■fair owner is an antique set of gold or- 


Of tiaras .and circlets for the head, in 
sizes large and small, the Princess has 
many, but two of them are not only re- 
markably handsome, but valuable from 
their associations. One was a wedding 
present from the Prince and is a diadem 
of brilliants arranged in two rows, and 
with 10 large brilliants at equal distances, 
surmounted by scroll ornaments, which, 
in their turn, are connected by Greek de- 





N. H. WHITE & CO. 


invite the attention of 
the trade to their 



DIAMOND STOCK, 


Mounted and Unmounted. 


MEMO. ORDERS SPECIALLY SOLICITED. 


They continue to be 



HEADQUARTERS for AMERICAN WATCHES. 



21 Maiden Lane^ New York 


s 


THE JEWELERS’ CIRCULAR-WEEKLY 


February 13, 11)01. 


vices in brilliants. The other is the tiara 
of diamonds consisting of 3t>5 splendid 
stones, each of which was the gift of a 
personal friend of the Princess, on her sil- 
ver wedding day. The shape is that of an 
old Roman coronet, and it was thought 
more suitable to make her an offering in 
that form than for each friend to make a 
smaller present. 

Perhaps the handsomest necklace the 
new Queen has. next to the Prince's 
present on her marriage day. is one of 
diamonds and pearls, with a pair of ear- 
rings to match, which was a wedding pres- 
ent from the Corporation of the City of 
London, but the diamond and ruby neck- 


.\n opal and diamond bracelet, inter- 
spersed with small emeralds, was an of- 
fering from Manchester ladies, and their 
sisters of Leeds gave one of particularly 
tine diamonds. The Duke and Duch.ss 
of Sa.xe-Coburg-Gotha seem to make a 
specialty of fine sapphires and continually 
give them in presents. To the Princess of 
Wales for her silver wedding they gave 
some splendid ones set with diamonds in 
a brooch, .\nother silver wedding present 
was the wonderful butterfly, which was the 
offering of the Grand Lodge of Free IMa- 
sons. It is a most brilliant and gorgeous 
glorified Psyche, consisting of dlT Brazil- 
ian diamonds of the finest luster, the eyes i 


Burglars Invade the Store of Richardson 
& Hammond. 

Lynnx ii.i.e, Tenn., Feb. o. — Excitement 
prevailed here last week, when it became 
known that Richardson & Hammond’s 
jewelry store had been entered during the 
night of Feb. 1 by burglars and several 
hundred dollars’ worth of jewelry carried 
off. A plate glass window in front was 
broken, showing where an entrance was 
effected. About 0.3o o'clock Dr. W. E. 
Scott, whose office is over the store, heard 
a noise and went down to investigate, but 
failing to see anything to arouse his sus- 
picion, thought nothing further of it until 
the discovery ne.xt niorning. Bloodhounds 




SO.WE JEWELS OF THE NEW QUEEN OF ENGLAND. 


OPAL AND DIAMOND BRACELET (FROM THE LADIES OF LEEDS). 


TIARA OP DIAMONDS (EACH OF THE 365 
STONES WAS THE GIFT OF A PER- 
SONAL friend). 


DIAMOND BUTTERFLY, WITH RUBY EYES (a 'SILVER 
WEDDING PRESENT FROM THE GRAND LODGE 
OF FREE masons). 


DIAMOND cross ON A STRING OF PEARLS (FROM 
THE LADIES OF LIVERPOOL). 


DIADEM OF BRILLIANTS (a SVEDDING GIFT FROM 
THE prince). 


lace she often wears runs it very close, 
and was the gift of the late Czar and her 
sister, the Czarina. .A very fine one of 
pearls and diamonds was presented by the 
late Grand Duke of Hesse and Princess 
-Alice. 

Her collection of bracelets is immense, 
and besides those that belong to sets of 
jewels she has one that is a most inter- 
esting memento of her marriage, and was 
presented by the eight daughters of Eng- 
lish peers who were her bridesmaids, and 
though strangers on that eventful day, 
were speedily admitted to the circle of her 
friends. It is of gold, richly set with bril- 
liants and divided into eight compart- 
ments, each of which contains the minia- 
ture portrait of one of the ladies, and on 
the reverse side her initial in diamonds on 
Garter blue enamel. 


being magnificent rubies. Jewels, after 
all, are only glittering stones, and 
even a Princess is but a woman, 
though when she is a good wife and 
mother, like the Princess of Wales, she 
I is worth more than all the gems of Gol-. 
conda. She herself, as all the world knows, 
esteems her children and grandchildren as 
the jewels of her life, and her happiest 
moments are spent in their companion- 
ship. 

Dingelhoef Bros. File a Petition in 
Bankruptcy. 

Wii.MixGTox, X. C.. Feb. 7. — Dingcl- 
hoef Bros., jewelers, filed a petition in 
bankruptcy here to-day. The liabilities 
are $2.80ti; assets, $2, 200. Hayden W. 

I Wheeler & Co.. New A’ork. are the largest 
I creditors, for -^onO, 


were telephoned for from Xashville. but 
the message was not received in time for 
them to reach here as expected. 

Xo clue has as yet been found as to the 
guilty parties. The proprietors estimate 
their loss at between .t3o" and and 

several others who had jewelry in the shop 
for repairs are losers. 


D. Gundling & Co. File a Petition in 
Bankruptcy. 

Trexto.x. X. J.. Feb. fl. — D. Gundling & 

1 Co., who several years ago made a sensa- 
i tional failure in Xew York, yesterday filed 
[ a petition in bankruptcy in the United 
I States District Court. The stated liabili- 
I ties are ^:i>n.7!)6.47 and the assets $6,379. 



February 13, 1901. 


THE JEWELERS’ CIRCULAR-WEEKLY. 



10 


THE JEWELERS’ CIRCULAR-WEEKLY. 


February 13, 1901, 


DIAMONDS. 

Wm. S. Hedges & Co., 

IMPORTERS OF 

Diamonds, other Precious Stones and Pearis. 

DIAMOND JEWELRY. 

170 Broadway, Maiden Lane, New York. 

26 Holborn Viaduct, London. 


Diamonds, Pearls 

AND FINE COLORED STONES. i 


FRED. W. LEWIS & CO., 

i 

1 MAIDEN LANE, i 

IMPORTERS AND CUTTERS, NEW YORK. | 


John F. 


Saunders, 


Cutter and Importer of 


DIAMONDS PRECIOUS STONES. 

FINE PEARLS A SPECIALTY. 

68 Nassau St., cor. John St., i6, NEW YORK. 



We carry the largest, finest and 
most complete line of Mounted 
Diamond Jewelry of any house In 
America. 


18 JOHN ST NEWYORK- 


NISSEN 


De Beers Co. Annual Meeting. 

Extracts from tbe Cbairman’s Speech of Inter- 
est to the Jewelry Trade. 

Kimberley, Jan. 5.— The t\velfth ordin- 
ary general meeting of shareholders of the 
De Beers Consolidated Mines, Limited, 
was held at the company’s office on Friday. 
Francis Oates presided, and there were also 
present: H. M. Penfold; F. Hirschhorn, 
and qq .\.Beit, J.Wernher, H. Hirsche, M. 
Ttlichaelis, L. Breitmeyer, L. Reyersbach; 
H. P. Rudd; C. E. Nind; D. J. Haarhoffi 
and in trust for H. J. Lange and J. E. 
Orpcn; D. Harris and qq Henry Barna- 
to, Barnato Bros., Jack Joel, S. B. Joel, 
Louis Abrahams and .Alfred -\brahams; T 
Tyson; A. W. Weatherby, qq M. Joseph, A. 
D. Joseph and G. H. Bonas; H. Beck; Isi- 
dore Mendelssohn; A. Brink; .\lpheus F. 
Williams; W. H. Beddy; C. F. Beaton, qq 
A. Mosely; Walker Marshall; F. Carstairs 
Rogers; T. Rowe English and qq Robert 
English; Thomas Shields, G. W. Compton; 
A. Reyersbach, qq Harry Mosenthal, G. J. 
S. Mosenthal. William Alosenthal. Isidore 
Dreyfus; O. D. Wright; F. J. Gardiner; 
qq John Morrogh; P. Peiser and qq K. C. 
Peiser; A. Aronson: Leon Sutro and qq 
A. Dunkels: Leopold Herz; Lionel .Abra- 
hams, qq Reuben Abrahams: E. F. Ray- 
ham and W. Pickering, secretary. 

Mr. Sutro proposed that the directors’ 
report, balance sheet and profit and loss 
account be taken as read. This was sec- 
onded by Mr. Haarhoff and unanimously 
agreed to. 

The chairman in his speech said among 
other things: 

Turning first to the directors’ report, which deals 
immediately with the balance sheet and profit and 
loss account, you will notice that we have made a 
profit on the year of £581,148 only. Well, that 
sum, as compared with previous years, is rather 
a small one. But being residents, most of you, you 
will readily understand why the profit is so very 
much less than usual. If you turn to the credit 
side of the profit and loss account you will find 
that our revenue from diamonds during the pres- 
ent year has been about 2,000,000, while the year 
before it was 4.000.000. As practical men, you will 
understand that the establishment of a great con- 
cern like this necessitates a very large expendi- 
ture, and that having to pay all our ordinary 
standing charges for the whole year out of half 
a year’s revenue, so to speak, and in addition 
having a number of extraordinary expenses thrown 
upon us — like our war expenditure, amounting to 
£167,000 — and also making allowance for the ordi- 
nary amount set down for depreciation — all these 
things together have made a great change in our 
balance sheet as compared with the year before. 
They also explain why the directors, much to the 
dissatisfaction, I fear, of shareholders at a dis- 
tance, thought it unwise to pay a dividend during 
the year. It is true that there was a balance of 
nearly £500,000 profit made, but that would have 
been insufficient for an ordinary dividend such as 
we have been accustomed to pay; and in the cir- 
cumstances of the country the directors deemed 
it wise to conserve their resources, in view of 
eventualities, and resolved to pay no dividend. I 
should like at this stage to state that the directors 
have just declared a dividend for the first six 
months of this financial year, ending Dec. 31, and 
not, as wrongly advertised, for the six months 
ending June 30. So that at any rate we are now 
in a better position than when we last met, thanks 
to the military authorities having relieved us from 
the state of siege, and thanks also to their co- 
operating with us as far as possible in allowing 
supplies to come forward to enable us to carry 
on some portion of our work. 

As the directors’ report shows clearly, we practi- 
cally did nothing during the siege, and subsequent 
to the siege, up to the end of the financial year, 
very little work was done. But since then there 
have been improved transport facilities, fuel has 

been allowed to some in, and to aonis extent ws 


February 13, 1901. 


11 


THE JEWELERS’ CIRCULAR-WEEKLY. 


have been able to procure native labor. But even 
at the present time we are not working full time; 
in fact, our operations are all more or less cur- 
tailed. Under the circumstances we must be thank- 
ful for mercies received, in that we have been able, 
after all, to get such returns for the past six 
months as have justified the directors in declaring 
a dividend. It was at one time hoped that we 
should have been. able to pay, in addition to the 
dividend, a bonus to shareholders, but we have not 
been able to increase our operations to the extent 
that we anticipated, and consequently it has been 
thought prudent not to carry out that intention. 
It is possible, however, later on, that if circum- 
stances improve, some acknowledgment in the way 
of bonus may be made to the shareholders in con- 
nection with the past year for which they have 
received no dividend. 

Of course, the figures before you in the balance 
sheet, and profit and loss account, are all large, 
and I would like to, point out a matter which has 
not been explained in the general manager’s re- 
port, but may, perhaps, be of interest to you. 
You will notice that the working expenses per load 
in nearly all the mines have increased during the 
past year. I think you will see that such an in- 
crease was inevitable, since we have had greater 
difficulties in working and we have had to pay our 
officers for supervision at times when we were 
unable to do any work at all; the expenses have 
been spread over a fewer number of loads, and that 
would naturally result in a higher working cost 
per load. We have also had to use English in- 
stead of colonial coal, which, on account of the 
increased railage charges and the high cost of fuel 
at the coast, has added considerably to our ex- 
penses. I may remark that it has never been the 
desire of the directors, and certainly not of the 
chairman, to bring down the cost of working by 
diminishing the wages of the workpeople. We 
hope that the cost of working will be lowered by 
improved methods and improved machinery. 

It is sometimes said, “Give a dog a bad name 
and hang him.” Traveling about the country one 
sometimes hears sneers being cast at Kimberley 
and the state of affairs in Kimberley. Well, I 
have lived here for 25 years, and I can safely say 
I have never known the condition of the working 
classes in Kimberley at any time so good as at the 
present. In spite of all that has been said about 
the action of the company in trying to work more 
systematically and economically, nothing has been 
done in the direction of paying lower wages, and 
I think if we take the wages paid to our work- 
people during the past seven years they will com- 
pare not unfavorably with those received by the 
same class of people in any other part of the 
country, not excepting Johannesburg. You will 
find from the general manager’s report that his 
motto is “Excelsior.” He has engaged a most 
competent assistant in Mr. Robbins for the purpose 
of carrying out an electrical installation,' the effect 
of which will be, we believe, in the direction of 
economy and to make the cost per load less. 
Neither the directors nor the general manager 
would be doing their duty if they did not adopt 
improvements of this kind, but in the other direc- 
tion in which it has been suggested so often that 
we contemplate changes, viz., reducing the wages 
of our employes, public rumor is altogether wrong. 
This applies to natives also. We pay natives a 
considerably higher wage than any other em- 
ployer in South Africa. 

I trust that the present temporary interruption 
of railway traffic will soon be overcome and that 
our work will go on with greater energy than we 
have been able to put into it just lately, so that 
by the time of the shareholders’ next meeting our 
work will have increased to a very large extent. 
W'e have a great many diamonds to produce to 
bring up the production to the normal amount. 
Allowing for the six months of last year when we 
produced practically nothing, we have a great deal 
of leeway to make up, and I believe the general 
manager is making his plans to increase the work- 
ing of both the Kimberley and De Beers mines 
and to provide for the working of Bultfontein, 
and later on, perhaps, Dutoitspan; and with due 
regard to the protection of the diamond market 
we shall increase our operations. For my own 
part, as an old resident of 25 years’ standing, I 
believe the prospects of Kimberley as a town and 
a community were never so bright as to-day. The 
better price which we have obtained, and are likely 
to obtain, for our diamonds will justify us in 
working our poorer mines, and consequently there 
will be employment found for a greater number of 
people than at present. The future of Kimberley, 
therefore, is assured, and there is no fear of that 
collapse which some people professed to foresee 





CHESTER BILLINGS ^ 

SUCCESSORS TO RANDEL, BAREMORE 

SON 

& BILLINGS 

1840 

Randel & Baremore 

1866 

Randel, Baremore & Co. 
1880 

Randel, Baremore & 
Billings 

IMPORTERS OF 

DIAMONDS 

OTHER PRECIOUS STONES AND PEARLS 

p DIAMOND 

^^40 jewelry 

New York 
58 Nassau Street 
29 Maiden Lane 

¥ 

London, E. C. 

22 Holborn Viaduct 




ESTABLISHED 1841. 

Carter, Hastings & Howe, 



MANUFACTURERS OF 

Gold Jewelry, 

9, 11, 13 MAIDEN LANE, = NEW YORK. 

FACTORY, NEWARK, N. J. 


A. CARTER. C. E. HASTINGS. Q. R. HOWE. W. T. CARTER. W. T. QOUQH. 


PATEK, PHILIPPE & CO ■J SWITZERLA^ 

MAKERS IN THE HIGHEST QUALITY OF 

Fine, Plain, Complicated 

And Decorated Watches 

HAVE ADDED TO THEIR MANY RECOMPENSES AND DISTINCTIONS, 

HORS CONCOURS, 

AT THE PARIS EXPOSITION. 


ii: 


THE JEWELERS’ CIRCULAR-WEEKLY. 


when the whole of the mines passed into the hands 
of the De Beers Company. There is no doubt as 
the world gets more civilized and the circle of 
wealth becomes wider, that the world’s demand for 
diamonds will go on increasing, and. consequently, 
while the company will have to use discretion in 
regulating the production to avoid crises of any 
kind, it seems to me certain that to supply the 
world’s needs in respect of diamonds, more work 
must be done by De Beers, and more work means 
employment of more people, and the prospects of 
Kimberley will consequently be belter, and, to my 
mind, they were never so bright as to-day. 

Mr. Haarhoff proposed that the follow- 
ing gentlemen be re-elected directors 
tor the ensuing year: C. E. Atkinson, 

Carl Meyer. F. Baring-Gonld, John Mor- 
rogh. G. \V. Compton. Harry Mosenthal, 
Sir Donald Currie. C. E. Xind, Robert 
English. F. Oates. T. E. Fuller. Captain H. 
M. Penfold, D. Harris, C. D. Rudd, L. S. 
Jameson. T. Shields. Captain Tyson sec- 
onded and the motion was carried. 

The chairman remarked that during the 
year changes had been made in the alter- 
nates of both their life governors. The 
alternate directors for them now were Mr. 
Hirschhorn, who was a decided acquisition 
to the board and an old Kimberley man, 
and IE P. Rudd, son of C. D. Rudd, also 
an old Kimberley man. 

Mr. Brink moved and .\lpheus Wil- 
liams seconded: That in accordance with 
provisions of clause 80 of the articles of 
association the sum of £9,087 2s. be voted 
to the directors, other than life governors, 
as remuneration for their services. 


C. G. Theiling, Chester, S. C., will open 
a branch store in Laurens, S. C., this 
month. 


Death of A. H. Simon. 

St. P.\ul, IMinn., Feb. 6. — Adolph H. 
Simon, for many years the proprietor of 
the jewelrj' store at E. 7th and Jackson 
Sts., died IMonday afternoon at his home, 
60 E. Summit .\ve. He was in poor health 
for nearly a year and gradually declined. 
Paralysis was the immediate cause of 
death. Mr. Simon is survived by a widow. 

-About one year ago Mr. Simon closed 
out his retail stock and went into the 
wholesale jewelry business, locating his 
establishment at 414 Robert St. He was 
a member of Union Lodge. No. 48, Odd 
Fellows, and the members of the lodge are 
requested to meet at 8 o’clock to-night in 
Odd Fellows’ hall, oth and Wabasha Sts., 
to make arrangements for attending the 
funeral. Mr. Simon was a member of An- 
cient Landmark Lodge, No. 5, A. F. and 
A. M. The funeral will take place at 2.30 
p. M., to-morrow, and will be in charge of 
-Ancient Landmark Lodge. 


W. F. Kirkpatrick Brings a Thief to 
Terms. 

St. Joseph, Mo., Feb. 3. — .A daring at- 
tempt was made yesterday to rob the dia- 
mond store of W. F. Kirkpatrick of a pair 
of valuable gems. .A richly dressed young 
man asked the proprietor to show him 
some of the best stones in the store, and 
in a very familiar way expressed his opin- 
ion of the different gems displayed befo’^e 
him. He appeared to be a good judge of 
diamonds, and as the proprietor turned his 
head for an instant two valuable loose 
stones disappeared from a paper. The dis- 
covery was instantly made by the proprie- 


February 13, 1901. 


tor. Very quietly he folded up the papers, 
leaving the one from which the stones had | 
been stolen until the last. 

Then saying carelessly that he had some- 
thing else to show him, the proprietor 
turned to a drawer in his desk, and, pro- 
ducing a revolver, said: "This is the gem | 
I want you to see. Please return those 
diamonds.” 

The thief protested that he had been in- 
sulted, but simultaneously dropped the 
stones into the paper and was permitted 
to depart. 


City Council of Leadville Considering 
Auction License Law. 

Leadville, Col., Feb. 3. — The matter 
of the city ordinance regulating the 
amount of the license to be paid by mer- 
chants desiring to have auction sales of 
their stocks of goods will likely come up 
for consideration. While the city won its 
case against Charles Roth, wherein the 
latter applied to the District Court for an 
injunction restraining the city from in- ' 
terfering. with his auction sale of his 
stock of jewelry, the City .Attorney, 
also County .Attorney Cavender, who, 
owing to the illness of City .Attorney 
Bouck, tried the case in the District Court, 
have advised the City Council to recon- : 
struct the ordinance with regard to auc- 
tion sales, they believing t at tl e or inance 
as it now stands is illegal, in that the li- 
cense of $100 a day is excessive and will 
not stand a test. The City Council will 
probably amend and reconstruct the ordi- 
nance in such a way that it will stand the 
test of the courts. 


PEARLS. 




* 

♦ 

♦ 

♦ 

♦ 

♦ 

♦ 

♦ 

♦ 

♦ 

♦ 

4 ^ 


Prepared : 


When you are in need of anything unusual, you generally 
'want it in a hurry. That is the time to remember that our 
stock is not only replete "with diamonds, pearls and precious 
stones of the grades usually carried, but that it contains gems 
of a character that cannot be duplicated. 

We have extraordinary facilities for securing the best in the 
markets of the ■world. The condition of our stock evidences 
this fact at a glance. 

Alfred H. Smith & Co., 


CHICAGO. 


182 Broadway, N. Y. 


LONDON. 




DIAMONDS 


And Other Precious Stones 


February 13, 1901. 


THE JEWELERS’ CIRCULAR-WEEKLY. 


13 


Infancy Not a Defense in Suit for Pay- 
ment of Bill. 

Troy, N. Y., Feb. 5. — Justice Fursman, 
P'eb. 2, denied a motion to open a judg- 
ment taken by default against Mrs. Sadie 
Clark Decker, of Hudson, by William B. 
Joseph, jeweler, of the same city, for $155. 

Mrs. Decker is said to be a member of 
a wealthy family in Columbia county, and 
the jewelry in the case was purchased, it 
is said, while she was a minor and without 
the knowledge of her family. She married 
subsequently, and when notice of an ac- 
tion against her for the amount due was 
scraped, she turned it over to her husband, 
so her attorney, L. R. Tilden, of Hudson, 
told the Court, and relied upon him to 
attend to the matter further. They went 
on a wedding trip and forgot all about the 
claim until their return, when Mrs. Decker 
found judgment filed against her. 

Attorney E. F. McCormick opposed the 
motion on behalf of Mr. Joseph and said 
the bill had stood a long time before judg- 
ment was taken. Mr. Tilden replied that 
the jeweler should have known better than 
give credit to a minor, especially when 
that minor was not in need of credit. He 
should have notified her family. 

“Do you mean to set up the defense of 
infancy for Mrs. Decker?” asked the 
Court. 

I think we will have to,” replied Mr. 
Tilden. 

‘‘Then your motion is denied,” said 
Justice Fursman decisively. “The young 
woman got the goods, enjoyed their use, 
got married, turned the affair over to her 
husband, went off on a wedding trip and 
forgot all about it, and now comes into 
court through counsel and pleads the baby 
act. It won’t go.” 


Death of A. D. Harlow. 

Belfast, Me., Feb. 8.— A. D. Harlow, 
of Winterport, one of the best known 
musicians in Maine, died at his home 
there, Jan. 26, of paralysis, aged 65 years. 
He was taken ill only the day before. The 
deceased was a native of Buckfield. He 
was a director of the Bangor band at three 
different periods, and was a veteran of the 
Civil War, having served as a musician 
and band director in the Second Maine. 
After the war he returned to Bangor, 
where he led the Bangor band until 1876. 
Upon leaving Bangor, he went to Paw- 
tucket, R. I., where he directed the local 
band for some years. From Pawtucket, 
where he remained two years, he went to 
Elgin, 111., where he was engaged as leader 
of the Elgin Watch Co.’s band. In 1898 
he went to Winterport, where he lived 
until the day of his death. He was en- 
gaged in the jewelry business there and 
also directed the Winterport band. He 
leaves a wife and two children. 


In a fire in Plymouth, N. C., N. B. Yea- 
ger, jeweler, lost $800; insurance, $500. 


ESTATE OF JOHN C. MOUNT. 


ADDISON W. WOODHULL. 


MOUNT 6 WOODHULL, 

Formerly with late firm of RANDEL, BAREMORE & BILLINGS, 

IMPORTERS OF ^ ^ .n DIAMONDS, 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 

OTHER PRECIOUS STONES, 
PEARLS, ETC. 0000000 


MAKERS OF^jiji 

FIJ^E 

DIAMOND 

JEWELKY. 


26 Maiden Lane 


(Southwest Corner Nassau Streeti, 


NEW YORK. 


William Kleinschmidt . George H. Howland. Frederick W. Ehrhard. 



^Peari 7/^erchants. 

We make a specialty of importing 

FINE, FANCY AND RARE GEMS: 

Njibies — Emeralds — Sapphires — Colored and Fancy 
Shaped APiamonds. 

IS9 iSroadwai/f Tfew 2/ork. 


(5 

() 

() 

() 

() 

() 

() 


1837. 

Geo. O. Street. 

1842. 

Geo. O. Street & Co. 

1863. 

Geo. O. Street & Son. 
1880. 

Geo. O. Street & Sons. 

FINE GOODS ONLY. 


GEO. O. STREET & SONS, 

Manufacturing Jewelers, 


CHICAGO OFFICE, 

103 State Street. 



24 JOHN STREET, 

NEW YORK. 





IMPORTERS 


OBBERS OF 


DIAMONDS 

WATCHES 

JEWELRY 


9-11-13 MAIDEN LANE, 

NEW YORK. 


62-64 STATE STREET. 

ALBANY, N.Y. 


u 


THE JEWELERS’ CIRCULAR-WEEKLY 


February 13, Ibul. 


D. C. DE LARA 

(Formerly foreman of Ed. Van Dam), 

Diamond Gutter and Polisher 

FOR THE TRADE. 

Rou{h Recuttiog, Repairing 
and Matching a Specialty. 


Office and Factony: 

ROOMS 303 & 304 BBEKMAN BUILDINa, 

101 BEEKMAN STREET, 

Cor. Pearl Street, NEW YORK. 




S. GOLDNER 

MANUFACTURER OF 

Fine Diamond 
Mountings, 

85 Nassau St., New York. 


Pat applied for 


AMERICAN PEARLS 

and baroques bought for cash or sold ou 
commission. Correspondence solicited. 
Established i88o. 

We also make a nice line of baroque pearl 
jewelry for the trade. 

CHAS. S. CROSSMAN & CO., 

3 Maiden I,ane, New York. 



ARREAUD & GRISER, 

• a a 70 Nassau St., New York. 

LAPIDARIES. 

EMS in Unique Cuttings. 


ESTABUSOEB 1869. 



HERMAN KOHLBUSCH, Sr., 

Manofacturer of 

Fine Balances and 
Weights 

for every purpose where ao- 
curacy is required. 

Office and Saleeroom, 

194 BROADWAY, 

5BND FOR PRICE-LIST. Tel., 370 Cortlandt. NEW YORK. 


Jewelry Seized by Creditors of Charles 
E. Katsch Belonged to Him. 

New Haven, Conn., Feb. G. — Referee 
Xewton to-day decided that the stock of 
jewelry seized by creditors in the store of 
Charles E. Katsch. jeweler. Washington 
building, on Church St., does not belong 
to the American Jewelry Co., as was al- 
leged. but to Mr. Katsch, and that the 
creditors have proper claim upon it in the 
bankruptcy proceedings that are now pend- 
ing. The claim was made by Mr. Katsch 
that the jewelry belonged to the American 
Jewelry Co. A petition was thereupon 
presented that the stock be taken out of 
the custody of the trustee, Samuel Good- 
man. The matter has been argued before 
the referee for two days. When the law- 
yers finished to-day Referee Newton 
denied the motion for the removal of the 
trustee. Mr. Katsch will be examined by 
the creditors on ^Monday, Feb. 11. 

Referee Newton in his decision upholds 
the trustees, marshal and creditors in their 
action in the matter, and furthermore, 
declares that the American Jewelry Co. 
were one on paper only and were created 
for fraudulent purposes. The trustees, 
marshal and creditors were represented by 
Kleiner, Strouse & Tuttle, while the jew- 
elry company were represented by attor- 
ney J. B. Tuttle. 

Papers in suits for claims aggregating 
^!2,350 on Charles E. Katsch, of the Amer- 
ican Jewelry Co., were filed in the Superior 
Court to-day b}' Deputy Sheriff Dejon. 
The suits were brought through attorney 
David Strouse, representing Henry Freund 
& Bro., New York, whose claim is for 
$850, and Gattle, Ettinger & Hammel, New 
York, whose claim is for $1,500. A large 
quantity of jewelry was attached to secure 
each of the ca.ses. In the complaint it is 
alleged that the goods in question were 
purchased last September. 

Some of the creditors, through their at- 


torneys, claim that Katsch disposed of his 
jewelry store on Church St. to the .Amer- 
ican Jewelry Co., and that the company 
were formed with some of Katsch’s family 
as holders of some of the stock. It is 
claimed that the property was worth much 
more than it was sold for. It was dis- 
posed of for $1,800. and some of the credi- 
tors state that it was worth $10,000. 


Examination into the Affairs of Abraham 
Frackman. 

The examination into .the affairs of 
.Vbraham Frackman, 379 Grand St., New 
\ ork, against whom an involuntary peti- 
tion in bankruptcy was filed, as told in 
The Circular-Weekly, Jan. 23, has 
been going on the past two weeks, being 
conducted by Epstein Bros., who repre- 
sent the creditors. This matter is due to 
come up in the United States District 
Court, to-day. 

It was claimed that Frackman disposed 
of part of the stock in his store just be- 
fore the failure, with intent to defraud 
creditors'. Frackman claimed that the 
goods, worth about $1,000, disappeared 
from the store in some manner he could 
not explain, during the time he was not at 
the store and while it was in the hands of 
the City Marshal who made an attachment 
or the receiver appointed by the United 
States District Court. 

Frackman testified in his examination 
that when he left the store, Jan. 14, there 
were gold watches, diamonds and jewelry 
there as usual, but he did not know how 
much in value. City Marshal Samuel I. 
.Abramson told of serving two attachments 
on Jan, 14. He took nothing from the 
store, but made an inventory. There were 
no gold watches nor diamonds to be 
found. 


Charles Sherwood's jewelry store, in 
Jerry City. O., was burned out Feb. 2. 



BROS. 4 

V3' Importers and Cutters, /a 


CORNER NASSAU and JOHN STREETS, NEW YORK. 


Amsterdam, 2 Tulp Straat. 


London, 45 Holborn Viaduct. 

’ ♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦ 



THE JEWELERS- CIRCULAR-WEEKLY. 


in 


February 13, 1901. 


Death of William S. White. 

Utica, N. Y., Feb. 7. — While on a visit 
at South New Berlin, William S. White 
died last Saturday morning, after a brief 
illness. He had not been in the best of 
health for the past two years, suffering 
from the effects of a fall upon the icy side- 
walk. 

Mr. White was born in Bloomville, Del- 
aware county, 47 years ago. In 1885 he 
located in Watervulle, where for 11 years 
he was engaged in the jewelry business. 
Mr. White was compelled by failing health 
to give up his business, and for the past 
five years he had resided in Utica. He was 
a fine mechanic and a very genial man, 
well informed on the topics of the day. 
He was a member of Sanger Lodge, F. 
and A. M., of Waterville, and Republican 
in politics. In December, 1884, Mr. White 
married Miss Helen Martin, of Schoharie 
county, who survives, with two sons, War- 
ren and Walter. 


E. K. Shaw Kills His Wife and Tries to 
Kill Himself. 

Richmond, Ind., Feb. 5. — The news has 
been received in this city of a tragedy at 
Anniston, Ala. E. K. Shaw was engaged 
in the jewelry business in Dublin, Wayne 
county, until last Spring, when he left with 
his wife for the south. At Anniston klr. 
and Mrs. Shaw were arrested for taking 
subscriptions for the Ladies’ Home Journal 
and keeping the money. The night of 
their arrest they hired a special officer to 
guard them at the hotel, in order that they 
might not spend the night in jail. Dis- 
graced, disheartened and with the odium 
of a criminal charge resting over them. 
Shaw deliberately cut his wife’s throat and 
then cut his owm. Mrs. Shaw was dead 
when found, but he will probably recover. 

Shaw will be tried for murder as soon 
as he is able to appear in court. A letter 
written by them jointly and left on a table 
in the room where the tragedy took place 
was addressed to the dead woman’s sis- 
ter, Mrs. J. F. Smith, of Crown Point, Ind. 
It gave the particulars of their intention 
to die together and made a disposition of 
their property. 


New Working System at the Elgin Watch 
Factory. 

Elgin, 111., Feb. 5. — President Hulburd, 
of the Elgin National Watch Co., has de- 
cided to try the nine-hour day in the big 
factory of the company here, commencing 
on May 1 and continuing for six months. 
The working hours will be nine hours five 
days in the week and eight hours on Sat- 
urday, with no reduction of pay. The an- 
nouncement ivas made to-day and is en- 
tirely voluntary. 


Chris. Jansen, a Davenport, la., jeweler, 
joined the Excelsior Rifle Club, which in- 
cludes all the expert shots of that city 
about a month ago, and the veterans of 
the club are wondering where he learnc ' 
to shoot. At last week’s contest he wen 
a handicap event, possible 250, with a 
score of 242, and the open event, possible 
75, with a score of 74, defeating some of 
the best shots of the Middle States, 


PEARLS. 

256 Westminster St., Providence, R. I. Tel. No., C O I NT lA 

10 Rue Cadet, Paris. 662 Cortl t. LiUU LFt K.1 tlN IJ DK.L'O., 

Lapidary Works: 93=95 Wiiliam St., New York. 9=11=13 Maiden Lane, New York. 



MALLIET, MAXWELL & ROSS, 

Diamona €utter$, 

U MAIDEN LANE, - - = NEW YORK. 

LONDON, 50 Holborn Viaduct. 

AMSTERDAM, 2 Tulpstraat. 

Successors TO HENRY FERA. ESTABLISHED 1871. 

FERA & KADISON, 

IMPORTERS AND CUTTERS OF 

DIAMONDS. 

DIAMOND JEWELRY, PRECIOUS STONES and PEARLS. 


Cutting Works: 1326 Atlantic Ave., Brooklyn. 65 NASSAU STREET, 

European House: 2 1 , 23, 25 Loojersgracht, Amsterdam, Holland. NEW YORK. 



in 


THE JEWELERS’ CIRCULAR-WEEKLY. 


February 13, 1901. 


Durand A Co. Searching for a $3,000 
Emerald. 

Newark. X. J., Feb. 8. — The loss of a 
particularly tine emerald under very un- 
usual circumstances has been giving 
Durand &• Co. much concern the past few 
days. The ^tone. which was valued at 
^l.oOO. had been received from a New 
York house to be mounted. It was taken 
to the stone setting department and 
handed to the foreman. He in turn 
handed it to one of the workmen, who 
picked it up with a pencil of beeswa.x and, 
as he supposed, placed it in the prepare ! 
setting. Just then he heard a click as of 
something falling upon the iron floor at 
his feet as he was wiping the beesw x from 
his fingers upon hij apron. He looked 
first to the floor, then to his bench, and 


then to the prepared setting. The gem 
was gone. A search was begun imme- 
diately and continued actively for sev- 
eral days, but the stone has not been 
found. 

The floor is of closely riveted sheet 
iron, and evert' inch of it has been gone 
over by daylight and bull’s-eye lamps re- 
peatedly, while every part of the work- 
bench has been closely examined. The 
stone is a large one, but microscopic 
crevices were searched for fragments of 
it. The workman who handled it is a 
veteran employe of tln^ house and has set 
thousands of gems of equal or greater 
value. He is not under suspicion, nor 
will the members of the firm disclose his 
name. 

The search has not yet been given up. 


The Paris Diamond Market. 


Paris, France, Feb. 1. 

Le Dtamant says in its last issue: Bert 

is still excessively dear. 

It is reported from .Amsterdam that 
.\merican buyers have recently paid the 
following prices for good merchandise: 
Gros mele, 300 to 325 francs per karat; 
two grains, 330 to 360 francs per karat; 
three grains, 350 to 380 francs per karat, 
and other sizes in the same ratio. 

Meeting of the New Directors of the Jew- 
elers’ Association and Board of Trade. 

The first meeting of the new hoard of 
directors of the Jewelers' .\ssociation and 
Board of Trade was held Wednesday. Twi 
vacancies in the board were filled, one 
caused by the death of J. B. Bowden and 
one caused by the resignation of G. W. 
Van Deventer, of the Waterbury Clock 
Co. The new men elected are: Seth E. 
Thomas, of Seth Thomas Clock Co., and 
Simon Fink, of Fink, Bodenheimer & Co. 
The usual committees for the present year 
were chosen and routine business trans- 
acted. 

The following firms were unanimously 
elected members of the Jewelers’ Associa- 
tion and Board of Trade: S. Davis & Co.. 
Chicago, 111.; Recob, Ziegler & Co., Chi- 
cago, 111.; Charles Kahn, J. M. Lafferty, 
Morris May & Co. and Meyrowitz Mfg. 
Co., New York; National Self-Winding 
Clock Co., Bristol, Conn.; Rodenberg & 
Dunn, New York. 


The Police Oppose Statement as to the 
Death of Morris Silverman. 

Morris Silverman, a jeweler, was dis- 
covered lying behind a locked door in his 
store at 3056 Third Ave., New York. 
Tuesday night of last week, with a bullet 
wound in the back of his head. He died 
the next morning in Fordham Hospital 
after declaring that he had been shot by 
burglars who had attempted to rob his 
store. This statement is supported by 
Mrs. Silverman, but is opposed bj- the cor- 
oner and the police, who have the opinion 
that Silverman shot himself in the head 
and was not attacked by any one, in view 
of the fact that he was in his store when 
discovered, behind a locked door. 

Mrs. Silverman says that her husband 
had the door connected by an electric wire 
with a wheel by which he could lock it in 
a moment without moving from behind 
the counter, in order to be able to secure 
the door to prevent the escape of any one 
who might attempt to steal jewelry. It is 
claimed that Silverman was robbed of a 
diamond ring, a year ago, by a young man 
who took it from a tray of rings he was 
examining and escaped through the door. 
The locking device was then adjusted to 
prevent a similar robbery in future. 

John W. Babbitt. Danvers, iMass., has 
sold out to Willard E. Morse, who will 
take possession on April 1. 

Deputy United States Marshal Sheehan 
served a restraining order on J. W. Hilker, 
jeweler. Wells, Minn., whose creditors are 
taking action in the bankruptcy court. Mr. 
Hilker is restrained from disposing of his 
stock. 




Timely Advice 

And the best advice we can offer 
is to replenish your depleted stock 
of Diamonds and Diamond Jewelry 
NOW, It is not too early. If 
you haven’t the goods to offer, of 
course you cannot make sales, 
but if you make a proper showing 
NOW you will be surprised at the 
extent of your Spring business. 
Besides, it will gain you a reputa- 
tion as a diamond house that will 
be of considerable value to you 
when the busy season begins. In 
the meantime, if you have calls 
for special pieces that you haven’t 
in stock, we can help you. 

Hayden W. Wheeler & Co., 

TWO MAIDEN LANE, N. Y. 

Tslsphona, 8 Cortlandt. 

80 H0L80RN VIADUCT, LONDOR. 




February 13, 1901. 


THE JEWELERS’ CIRCULAR-WEEKLY. 


17 


Fire in the Factory of the Whiting Mfg. 

Co. 

The Whiting Mfg. Co. and the American 
Watch Case Co. were heavy sufferers from 
a fire in the four story building, corner of 
E. 4th St. and Lafayette Place, New York, 
Wednesday night. So extensive was the 
damage from fire and water that both con- 
cerns were obliged to temporarily cease 
business. The Whiting Mfg. Co. succeed- 
ed in resuming work in part of their de- 
partments, Monday, but it may be two 
weeks yet before the watch case company 
can resume operations. The loss was 
greatest to the Whiting Co. and will be 
between $50,000 and $75,000, but much of 
the damage cannot be estimated in cash 
values. The American Watch Case Co., 
who rented the upper floor of the building 
from the Whiting Co., suffered extensively, 
mainly from water. Both concerns carried 
full insurance. About 500 men were tem- 
porarily deprived of employment. 

The fire started on the second floor, 
probably in a new flue which had recently 
been put into the building and into which 
was swept the waste powder that had been 
used for polishing silver ware. The fire 
was confined principally to this floor and 
the one above, but the first floor offices, 
engine room and basement were flooded 
by water. Only a few dies were destroyed, 
as all but the few in actual use are stored 
in specially built vaults under 4th St. The 
shafting and machinery throughout the 
building were warped and damaged by heat 
and water so that they will have to be 
thoroughly overhauled before they can be 
used. A number of important designs in 
use were destroyed. 

Two important pieces of work barely 
escaped ruin, and one was less lucky. The 
Hobson testimonial to be presented to the 
hero of the Merrimack incident of the Span- 
ish war, illustrated and described in The 
Circular-Weekly of Nov. 7, 1900. had 
been in the factory on the second floor, 
receiving some final touches, and was taken 
the day before the fire to its destination 
in another part of the city. The large and 
elaborate punch bowl, to be a part of the 
silver service for the new battleship Illinois, 
to be presented by. the citizens of that 
State, had been in that same department 


EICHBERQ & CO., 

Importers and Cutters of 

DIAMONDS, 


65 Nassau Street (Prescott Building-), NEW YORK. 


“The 

EISENMANN BROS., 


IMPORTERS OF 

Pearl 

FINE ORIENTAL PEARLS, 

Haiico 

Diamonds and Precious Stones, 


Paris, 3 Rue St. Georges. 21 & 23 MAIDEN LANE, N. Y. 


DAY, 

CLARK & CO., 


IVIAKBRS OF 


Kine Jewelry, 

14 K. ONLY. 

33 Maiden Lane, 

CTX) 

nr 

New York. 



Established is72. 


A. ROSEMAN, 

IMPORTER OF DIAMONDS, 

MAKER OF DIAMOND JEWELRY. 

HEADQUARTERS FOR AMERICAN WATCHES. 

9, 11, 13 Maiden Lane, New York. 


(A 

(U 

z 


t/3 

< 

O. 

o 


c/} 

u 

s 

3 

£ 

H 

Z 

cu 

3 

tn 


CATSEYBS 


SAPPHIRES 


DIAMONDS I RUBIES | EMERALDS 


PEARLS 


PEARL NECKS | PEARL ROPES 


•o 

ft 

to 


n 

o 


O UR stock of Diamonds, Pearls and Precious Stones being the largest 
and best assorted in the trade is specially adapted to the filling of 
regular orders. A well=known feature of our business on which we 
bestow careful attention is the catering for memorandum orders for goods 
which are too expensive to be carried in regular stocks. 

Our goods are insured in transit to any amount. 

Complete stock of Pearl Necks and Pearl Collarettes with Diamond 
Bars. 

19-20 H^rviaduct. JOSEPH FRANKEL’S SONS,“*Nl^*“v“o*Rr’ 

Telephone, 2733 John. 

FANCY COLORED DIAMONDS and GEMS in PEARLS and PRECIOUS STONES. 


o 

S' 

B 

o 


os 

«a 


IS 


THE JEWELERS’ CIRCULAR-WEEKLY. 


February 13, 1901. 


Alfred H. Smith 6 Co., 


and was removed only the evening of the 
fire to the floor below, where the flames 
did not reach. 


Importers of Gems, 


182 BROADWAY, NEW YORK, 

WILL ‘BUY 

A merican ‘Pearls 

THE jFINER AND MORE IMPOR= 

TANT THE BETTER. SEND 
THEM TO US, WITH LOWEST 
CASH PRICE, AND WE WILL RE= 

PORT IMMEDIATELY. 


Importers of 
DIAMONDS AND 
PRECIOUS STONES. 




14 Maiden Lane 
(Diamond Exchange Building). 

NEW YORK. 








DIAMONDS 


Pearls, Emeralds, 
Rubies, Sapphires. 

9-13 Maiden Lane, 

NEW YORK. 

PARIS: CHICAGO: 

25 Boulev’d Haussmann. 103 State Street. 


.A « 

Of 


4 


Peculiar Action of the Common. Council 
of Boston. 

Boston, Mass., Feb. 8. — .\t the meeting 
last evening of the Boston Common Coun- 
cil, the following order was introduced by 
Councilman Mildram of Ward 24, and has 
aroused considerable comment among the 
jewelry trade. It is of especial interest 
to the Thomas Long Co., 77 Summer St., 
the successful bidders for supplying the 
badges for this year. 

“Ordered, that a committee of five members of 
the Common Council be appointed to procure ex- 
pert evidence on the value of the badges furnished 
this year to the members of the Common Council, 
and to consult with dealers in old metal concerning 
the best terms obtainable for the badges in bulk. 

Ordered, that the City Auditor be directed not 
to pay the bill for these badges until this com- 
mittee has reported its findings to the Common 
Council and the latter has taken action thereon.” 

-\s soon as President Kiley realized the 
purport of the order he ruled it out as “dis- 
courteous -to a committee of the Common 
Council.” 

At the office of the Thomas Long Co. 
little could be learned about the matter. 
The firm declined to discuss the affair 
more than to say that it was a case of 
"petty politics.” Other members of the 
trade do not hesitate, however, to talk 
more freely and intimate that it is a case 
of being “sore” on the part of a firm who 
have supplied the badges in former years, 
but who lost the contract this year. The 
badges cost $7 each, and as there are 7-5 
councilmen, the bill is $525, and is worth 
trying to secure. 

Mr. Davidson, the treasurer of the 
Thomas Long Co., said that his firm were 
ready to stand back of their workmanship 
to any degree, and from the fact that the 
committee on badges accepted the design 
and sample submitted by the Thomas Long 
Co., it would appear that the city would 
have to pay the bill. 


Prooeedings of The Jewelers' League. 

The regular monthly meeting of the 
executive committee of The Jewelers’ 
League was held Feb. 8. There were pres- 
ent Vice-Presidents Fessenden, Bardel and 
Greason, Messrs. Street, Karsch, Lissaue- 
and secretary L. Stevens, Jr. Upon mo- 
tion duly made and seconded, G. M. Van 
Deventer, of Waterbury Clock Co., was 
chosen chairman of the executive commit- 
tee for 1901. 

Five recpiests for change of beneficiary 
were received and upon motion granted 
and the following applicants were admitted 
to membership: Edwin V. Sweet, New 
York, recommended bj' N. D. Prentiss and 
L. -A. iMiller; George A. Street, Brooklyn. 
New York, recommended by George W. 
Street and L. A. Miller; William J. Elson. 
Brooklyn, New York, recommended bj- R. 
F. Forrester and L. A. Miller; H. E. 
Brown. New York, recommended by E. H. 
Brown and L. A. ^liller; William L. Pen- 
field. Hawthorn, Conn., recommended by 
E. H. Brown and L. A. Miller; M. J. 
Mahlmeister, New York, recommended by 
E. A. Lehmann and L. A. Miller. 

The ne-xt meeting will be held March 8. 


February 1901. 


THE JEWELERS’ CIRCULAR-WEEKLY. 


19 


The Giant of 
Collar Buttons 


HOW TO AVOID IMITATIONS 



The Krementz One-Piece Rolled Gold Plated Collar Button is 
always sold on a card like this: 


The Krementz One-Piece Gold Collar 
Button is always sold on a card like this: 



SOLID GOLD. 

THE "KREMENTZ." ONE .PIECE. 


Made by Krementz & Co. 
Pat. May 6, I 884. 



FRONT OF CARD. 


BACK OF CARD, printed in light green ink. 

P icsimile of front and back of cards used for Rolled Gold Plated Krementz One-Pieci. 

Collar Buttons. 


GUARANTEE. 

Starting with aflat jtiece of metal. THE KREMENTZ collar 
button is made without joint or solder. It cannot break. If from 
ANY CAUSE one should be damaged either in the hands of the 



“®nel=lpilece." 

dealer or consumer a new button will be ffiven in exchange* 
liftbcl copyright 1899, 

KREMENTZ t( CO., 

Newark, N. J. 


BACK OF CARD, printed in light green ink. 


We receive many imitations of the Krementz One-Piece Collar Buttons for exchange under our 
guarantees^ showing that dealers are frequently deceived in purchasing the former. 

Note our copyright labels as above printed in light green ink. 


Krementz One-Piece Collar Buttons are 
stamped as follows, ON BACKS: 






Patent sustained by 
United States Supreme Court. 


QUALI'TY AND CONSTRUCTION HAVE MADE OUR. REPUTATION. 

KREMENTZ & CO., 49 chestnut street, 


PARKS BROS. & ROGERS, 20 Maiden Lane, New York. 

Selling Agents to Jobbing Trade. 


NEWARK, N. J 


Write for our booklet; “The Story of a Collar Button, with Illustrations.” 


20 


THE JEWELERS’ CIRCULAR-WEEKLY. 


February 13, 1901. 



"irARES WITH THIS TRADE-MARK SELL." 



1853-IQOI. 

B. & S. M. KNOWLES CO., 


Sterling Silver Table Ware. 


OFFICE AND FACTORY, 91 SABIN STREET, 
PROVIDENCE, R. I. 



CiK IHauser lUffl, Co., 


Importations at the Port of New York. 


Weeks Ended Feb. g, igoo, and Feb. S, igoi. 


China, Glass and Earthen ^\'are: 1900. 1901. 

China $86,787 $61,985 

Earthen ware 14,880 14,924 

Glass Ware 19,432 (?) 

Glass, optical 82 

Instruments: 

Musical 16,222 5,610 

Optical 1,379 8,791 

Philosophical 839 

Jewelry, etc.: 

Jewelry 10,577 18,927 

Precious stones 154,787 234,568 

Watches 7,252 17,361 

Metals, etc.: 

Bronzes 600 1,451 

Cutlery 36,064 19,626 

Dutch metal 4,540 693 

Platina 25,019 21,242 

Silver ware 88 448 

.Miscellaneous : 

Alabaster ornaments 159 379 

Amber 11,846 

Beads 3,579 1,701 

Clocks 2,540 2,419 

Fans 17,630 419 

Fancy goods 16,789 15,015 

Ivory 2,859 2,953 

Ivory, manufactures of 481 28,367 

Marble,- manufactures of 4,429 13,887 

Statuary 2,963 


Proceedings of the Jewelers* Security 
Alliance. 

The regular monthly meeting of the 
Jewelers’ Security Alliance was held on 
Feb. 8 , the following members being pres- 
ent: Chairman Butts, Vice-President 

Stern, Treasurer Karsch, Secretary Noyes 
and Messrs. Wood, Sloan, Kroeber and 
Champenois, of the committee. 

The deaths of J. B. Bowden and David 
Untermeyer having left the Alliance with- 
out a president and first vice-president, A. 
K. Sloan, of Sloan & Co., was elected 
president; Leopold Stern, of Stern Bros. 
& Co., first vice-president; F. Kroeber, 
second vice-president; C. G. Alford, of C. 
G. Alford & Co., and A. L. Brown, ot 
Avery & Brown, members of the execu- 


* * Silvtrsitiitbs. * • 

Office and Factory, 14 East 15th Street, NEW YORK. 

BRANCHES: 

CHICAGO, 126 State Street; Jack Stanley, Representative. 
NEW YORK, Gill Bldg.; Louis B. Cummings, Representative. 



oOC> 

Dominick & Haff, 

MAKBRS OF C XP? Dl Il\jn 

WARBS IN ^IClvLIiNlJ OlLVCflV TRADE ONLY. 

860 Broadway, 

Union Square, New York. 

Vest Pocket Directory eor Buyers. .25 cents a copy. 

The Jewelers’ Circular Publishing Co. 


tive committee. These elections are for 
the remaining part of the year, ending 
May 7, the constitution providing that in 
case of any vacancies the executive com- 
mittee shall fill them until the next annual 
meeting. 

New members were elected as follows: 
Sylvester Engle, Hazleton, Pa.; Simon 
Onderwyzer, New York cit}G Cornelius 
Pieper, Zeeland, Mich.; William Keck, 
Muskegon, Mich.; King, Raichle & King, 
Bufifalo, N. Y.; Lundberg & Lee, San 
Francisco, Cal.; Ernest F. Randolph, 
Farina, 111.; Riheldaffer & Brownfield,. 
Fairmont, W. Va.; James Bergman, New 
York city; J. D. Dalzell & Co., Newark, 
N. J. ; D. W. S. Hodges, Mansfield, Mass.; 
H. S. Johnston, Apollo, Pa.; Lochman 
Bros., Springfield, 111.; Woods & Chatel- 
lier. New York citj'; H. H. Blase, Wilkes- 
Barre, Pa.; Stephen A. Bowers, Creston, 
la.; Lewis P. Boyle, Corydon, la.; H. E. 
Conklin, Chanute, Kan.; F. -A. Coville, 
Wayland, Mich.; H. D. Barnett & Bro., 
Ironton, O.; Peter Miller, Kingman. Kan.; 
D. D. Williams & Co., Emporia, Kan. 


Rcinheimer’s jewelry store, Joplin, Mo., 
was destroyed by fire at an early hour on 
the morning of Jan. 31. The loss in 
jewelry stock was heavy and was only par- 
tially covered by insurance. 



February 13, 1901. 


THE JEWELERS’ CIRCULAR-WEEKLY. 


21 


New Goods for the New Year. 



We have added considerably to our line of 

Chatelaine Bags 
and Purses, 

and are keeping up 
our reputation for 


HANDLED BY 
LEADINQ 
JOBBERS. 


WHITING & DAVIS, 

Manufacturers, 

PLAINVILLE, MASS. 

NEW YORK OFFICE. 14 JOHN STREET. 


Styte, Finish^ 


*BJght Prices. 


It is acknowledged the most 
complete and satisfactory line 
in the market. 


fVorictnanship and 


THE TE\\'ELERS’ CIRCULAR-WEEKLY. 


February 13, 1001. 


22 


Barrettes in all Styles. 


Staple 
Patterns and 
Navelties. 

We illustrate 
one novelty. 

Barrettes 

AND 

HAIR CLASPS 

from S‘2-50 to 
Slo.OOdoz. 

silkTobs, 

Ladies' or 
Gents’. ' 

FAN CHAINS. 

Ribbon Spikes, 
Sterling Silver 

S4o. doz. up. 

Hearts, 
Brooches, 
Cuff Links, 
Bracelets, 
Lorgnette 
Chains. 

Send for selec- 
tion of latest de- 
signs. 



No. 99, Sterling, each $1.00. 
Roman, Rose or Green Finish. 


CHAS. L. TROUT « CO. 

5 eSc 7 Maiden Lane, New York. 

Gold Goods and filled goods. 


Death of Albert Landsberg. 

Detroit, Midi., Feb. 8. — Albert Lamls- 
berg, president of the firm of L. Black & 
Co., jewelers and opticians, and one of the 
oldest business men in Detroit, died Wed- 
nesday night, at the Alhambra Flats. He 
suffered a stroke of paralysis last Sum- 
mer. from which be never recovered. iMr. 
Landsberg was (34 years of age, was born 
at Breslau, Germany, and came to this 
country when 13 years of age. When very 
young lie engaged in the optical business 
with L. Black, who died in 1870. He con- 
tinued the business, witli his sister as a 
partner. 

The day of his death was the 34th anni- 
versary of his wedding. Two }'ears ago 
the firm of L. Black & Co. were incor- 
porated, and Mrs. Black, whose home is 
now in Europe, continued as a partner 
with A. Black, M. Black and Mr. Lands- 
herg. For years the business was carried 
on at the corner of Jefferson and Wood- 
ward .\ves. Several years ago a move 
was made up town to 156 Woodward Ave., 
where a large business is done. The de- 
ceased leaves a wife, who has been the 
leading spirit in the business for the last 
two years. 


Death of Charles Terheyden, Sr. 

Pittsburgh, Pa., Fell. 7. — Charles Ter- 
heyden. Sr., one of the first manufactur- 
ing jewelers in Pittsburgh, died on the 
night of Feb. 6, at Iiis residence, 5000 
Liberty Ave. He had been ailing for 
some time, hut was- only confined to the 


house for !•) days. Death was due to 
pneumonia and grip. 

Afr. Terheyden was horn in Germany 
78 years ago, hut came to this country in 
1845, locating in Pittsburgh. He had been 
a jeweler in his native land and was con- 
nected with the firm of James B. McFad- 
den, of this citj'. .\hout 4o years ago he 
formed a partnership with B. Berkley for 
the purpose of manufacturing jewelry. 
.-Miout '25 years ago he purchased the in- 
terest of Mr. Berkley, and until a few 
years ago conducted the business himself. 
He had been engaged in the jewelry busi- 
ness on Smithfield St. for 40 years. 

For 30 years the family resided on Troy 
Hill, Allegheny, and while there Mr. Ter- 
heyden was a memlier of the Church of 
the Holy Name. Later he was connected 
with St. Joseph's Church. He was a 
member of St. George’s Ritters. The de- 
ceased is survived liy his wife, three sons — 
Henry, the jeweler, of Smithfield St.; 
Charles, Jr., the manufacturing jeweler, 
and Dr. William Terheyden, also a one- 
time jeweler. Three daughters, Louisa, 
-\nna and Clara, also survive him. 


Illinois Watch Co. Get a Full Verdict 
Aga inst Lapp & Flershem. 

Springfield, 111.. Feb. !). — The case of 
the Illinois Watch Co. vs. Lapp & 
Flershem was argued before Judge Gary, 
in the Circuit Court of Cook county. Feb. 
5 and 6. The jury returned a verdict for 
the plaintiffs in 'the full amount claimed, 
$1,882. 


THE BARLOW j 



• • 

i Triple Glass Shelf Fixture, showing ? 

I guard railing; base, 9 inches diameter; • 
I plate-glass shelves. 14, 18 and 22 inches j 
i square. • 

I No. 574, price $17-00 each. Prices on • 
I other sizes on application. Send for 200- • 
• page catalogue and supplement. | 

I I 

BARLOW MFG. CO., 

I Holyoke, Mass. ? 

i Boston Salesrooms, 125 Summer St. * 
i ? 


""’Tis a Good Job and Well Done.” 


Jobs “well done” are not so easily found in the jewelry, or any other 
business. Our years of experience and acquaintanceship with gold jew= 
elry enable us to match or repair articles with the minimum loss of time 
and expense. "We have a specially organized department for this pur= 
pose and shall be pleased to have you avail yourself of its facilities. 

The execution of designs to suit individual tastes is a matter in 
which we take particular pride. Estimates cheerfully submitted. 


HENRY FREUND & BRO., 

Diamonds, Watches and Jewelry, 

MANY NEW DESIGNS 

IN ELK GOODS. 9-13 MAIDEN LANE, NEW YDRK. 


I^oward %m\m Co., 


SILVERSMITHS, 



PROVIDENCE AND NEW YORK. 

112 KEARNY ST., SAN FRANCISCO. CAL. 

Sample Lines at all commercial centres at regular intervals. 



February 13, 1901. 


THE JEWELERS’ CIRCULAR-WEEKLY. 


23 


Eternal Hustle^ Coupled with Honesty and Integrity^ is the Just Price of Success^ 






I .A. - 

1 




^SK FOR 1 


f K.' ^ ■' 

b^' M' o ^ 


9m 


MBMdCc 




if^^lSr^<?WPPED: 
I. ,PLANT ; 


?V 


li 


^21 


FL« ^^^■ I'x^tv. .---^,vw^ ^ , -- .... • ■ 

S.O.BIGNEY& HIGH-GRADE GOLD-FILLED CHAIN5 

ATTLEBORO, MASS. N. Y. Office, 3 Maiden Lane. 



L'4 


THE JEWELERS’ CIRCULAR-WEEKLY, 


February 13, 1901. 


HEADQUARTERS 



All Grades 
of 

Swiss 

Watches. 


Established 1863. 

CROSS ^ BECUELIN, 

17 MAIDEN LANE, NEW YORK. 


Ch>Z* 



COLUMBUS WATCHES 


...ARE... 


STRICTLY HIGH GRADE. 


...YOU CAN... 

MAKE MORE MONEY handling our t 


watches than with any other make. 


RAILWAY KING. 

i8 Size. 

Z 5 Ruby Jewels. 


The Columbus 
Watch Co., 

COLUMBUS, OHIO. 


Send for v 
New 

Prlce-Wst X 
and A 
Special 
Discounts. 


KEEP A COPY OF EVERYTHING. 

A Pen Carbon Letter Copying Book Free. No press required. Notes, Bills, Business 
and Society Correspondence copied while you write. We make this offer for a short time 
to introduce Blair’s Ink-Making Gold Fountain Pens for writing and manifolding. In these 
pens we give a year’s supply of the best water proof ink free. Produced by their ink- 
makiug cartridge and merely filling the holder with water. Either $1.75 and $2.00 and up- 
ward or all for a short time same price. A liberal discount by the dozen to the trade. 

BLAIR’S FOUNTAIN PEN CO. (W), 163 Broadway, New York. 


Tariff Decisions & Regulations. 


l)KAWn.\CK ON RIBBON GOLD LEAF. 

W.vsiii NGTON. 1). C., F 1). 5. — The Treas- 
ury Department has extended the provi- 
sions of the order issued on July 28, 1900, 
establishing a rate for allowance of draw- 
back on “rilihon gold leaf” of full width 
(3| inches), manufactured by the W. H. 
Coe Mfg. Co., Providence, R. I., to cover 
the same class of manufactures by the said 
company of narrow widths when exported. 

The instructions to the Collector of Cus- 
toms at Providence set forth that the 
drawback entry must show the number of 
unit packages in each case containing the 
same number and w'idth of rolls, the num- 
ber of rolls of each width exported and 
the equivalent of the exported rolls ex- 
pressed in terms of rolls of full width, that 
is to say, 3| inches wide. In the case of 
rolls of narrow widths 5 per cent, of the 
exported quantity will be added thereto 
to compensate for loss incurred in the 
manufacturing process. 


Sensational Jewel Theft in the Boston 
T rade. 

Boston, Mas.s., Feb. 8. — The case against 
John A. Smith, who is charged with the 
larceny of a diamond ring valued at $100, 
Pie property of Robert P. Stahl, jeweler, 
in the Jewelers building, developed a sensa- 
tional side in the East Boston Court this 
forenoon, when Smith was arraigned. 
Stahl did not want, to prosecute the young 
man and the latter was held in $500. 

The arrest of Smith occurred on Wed- 
nesday, and it is said that he was trying 
to sell the ring when the police put in an 
appearance. The story was that Stahl 
loaned the ring to a young woman friend 
and that Smith obtained it in some wav 
from her. When the case was called to- 
day Stahl was on hand bright and early 
and it is said tried to have the case settled 
out of court. The principal witness, or 
rather the one who attracted the most at- 
tention, was a young woman who gave the 
name of Mrs. Alice Brown. When asked 
what she knew about the case she declined 
to inform the Court and also declined to 
give her address. She also declined to 
give the name of the young woman said to 
have been with her on the night of the al- 
leged theft. Judge Emmons repeated his 
questions and, securing no response, or- 
dered the woman committed to jail for 
15 days for contempt of court. The case 
was thus summarily disposed of for to-day 
and was continued to Feb. 15. 


In a fire in the Eagle House, Marlboro, 
Mass., on the morning of Feb. 6, Alexan- 
der Chillette, jeweler, claims to have lost 
$3,000 worth of jewelry, watches, etc. 


AMERICAN «X>> ORIENTAL PEARLS 

IMPORTERS OF FINE COLORED STONES AND DIAMONDS. 

ADOLF J. GRINBERG CO., 

^ MAIDEN LANE, NEW YORK. 



February 13, 1901. 


THE JEWELERS’ CIRCULAR-WEEKLY. 


25 





Grand Prize, 


PARIS, 1900. 

A. WITTNAIER, 

MANUFACTURER AND SOLE IMPORTER OF 


THE CELEBRATED t 

t 

Agassiz and Longines Watches, | 

GILL BUILDING, | 

No. 9 MAIDEN LANE, NEW YORK. 




THE JEWELERS’ CIRCULAR-WEEKLY, 


February 13, 1901. 


2G 


Bench Jewelers of New York Have an 
Enjoyable Time. 

As an observance of the second anniver- 
sary of the Jewelers' Protective Union, 
Xo. 1. of New York, a ball and vaudevi'le 
show were given. Saturday evening, in 
Grand Central Palace, Lexington Ave., un- 
der the direction of the officers and com- 
mittees of the L'nion, for the pleasure of 
members and friends. The entertainment 
programme showed several attractive lines 
of entertainment, which were exhibited to 
their best advantage by stage manager 
James L. Barry. There were alternating 
turns of music, monologue, character and 
costume song, pantomime, reading, dia- 
lect singing and the inevitable one-act 
comedy sketch, all of which were well 
done by professional artists. The dancing 
was. perhaps, the feature that afforded more 
real enjoyment than any other of the even- 
ing, and until snug up to Sunday morning 
the feet of the union jewelry workers and 
their friends kept time to the orchestra’s 
tuneful music. 

The officers of the Union are: President, 
H. J. \'ollmer; vice-president. J. Windner; 
financial secretary, S. Zudeck; recording 
secretary, L. Traznik; trustees, R. Bryor, 
S. Haltricht, E. Koeppicus; auditors, R. 
Scheftel, C. Goetzinger, Buesing; 

sergeant-at-arms, G. Schicke. 

The ball was in charge of the following: 
Floor manager. S. Haltricht; assistant 
floor manager, George Peters; floor com- 
mittee, Charles H. Goetzinger, R, Scheftel. 
G. F. Rainess, C. Herwig, Albert Mente. 
F. E. Mansfield, John Pittavino, J. Spetin 


i William McKim, Charles Emrik, George 
Seeger, E. Wood, Edgard Royce, Joseph 
Lehn, Christopher Gran, P. B. Flaishnick. 
M. Kreutzer, Robert Grossmann. The 
general committee of arrangements in- 
cluded: Julius Windner, H. J. Vollmer, 

Joseph Gabryel, L. F. Traznik, S. Halt- 
richt. 


Detectives Go to Buffalo in Connection 
with the Ruprecht Robbery. 

Pittsburgh. Pa.. Feb. 9. — County de- 
tective Robert G. Robinson and detective 
Thomas McQuade have gone to Buffalo 
to look after the interests of Allegheny 
county, in the Ruprecht robbery case. 
Louis Mentz, who is alleged to have dis- 
posed of some of the watches stolen from 
Ruprecht’s store, in Sharpsburg, and who 
has been indicted for receiving stolen 
goods, has steadily maintained his inno- 
cence. It has been learned that he ob- 
tained the watches from Henry Altman, 
of Buffalo, and the case will be thorough- 
ly investigated. 

Detectives Robinson and McQuade will 
spend several days in Buffalo and will en- 
deavor to learn where Altman got the 
goods. District-Attorney Haymaker is 
determined to run the affair down if he 
has to appeal to the Governor of New 
York to assist him in the matter. The 
man who sold to Altman is now wanted 
by the police. Mr. Altman may yet be 
required to produce the man who sold 
him Ruprecht’s jewelry. 


A Point to Remember. 







MEANS 

DUEBER-HAMPDEN WATCHES 


AND 


Maiden Lane, New York. 




DUEBER-HAMPDEN WATCHES 

MEAN 



largest distributors in AMERICA. 

# ^^Sold at Retail. Get Into Correspondence With Us. 


Preparations for the Winter Banquet of 

Eastern Manufacturers' Association. 

Providexxe, R. I., Feb. 11. — The board 
of governors of the New England Manu- 
facturing Jewelers' and Silversmiths’ .As- 
sociation held a meeting at the law offices 
of Hon. George A. Littlefield, Saturday 
evening, and completed arrangements for 
the organization’s Winter banquet which is 
to take place at the Trocadero on the 
evening of Friday. Feb. 15. There was a 
full attendance of the members of the 
board of governors, and an enthusiasm 
was manifested that augured well for the 
future of the Association. It is expected 
that there will be present at the Winter 
banquet next Friday evening, which will 
be the first meeting of the Association 
since the adoption of the new constitution 
and by-laws, between 350 and 400 members 
and guests, and that the affair will be the 
largest of the kind held in this city 
in years. Beginning at 6.30 o’clock a re- 
ception will be held in the Troicadero par- 
lors, and at 7.30 o’clock the banquet will 
be served by Caterer Tillinghast. 

President Frank T. Pearce will preside 
at the postprandial exercises, when there 
will be speeches by prominent members of 
the Association in this city and the .Attle- 
boros, and by distinguished guests from 
abroad, upon subjects especially interesting 
to the jewelry fraternity. Music will be 
furnished during the evening by the .Apollo 
Male Quartette, of Boston, and the Glen- 
ham Orchestra, of this city. The board 
of governors also, at their meeting, Satur- 
day evening, elected 25 new members, this 
making over 50 members elected since the 
reorganization of the ' Association at the 
postponed annual meeting held Jan. 21. 
and bringing the total membership 
of the Association up to more than 200. 
This is a remarkable growth from 49 mem- 
bers, which was the total a year ago, 
and reflects much credit upon President 
Pearce and the other officers of the .Asso- 
ciation. 


Novel Case Over a Ring. 

Trexton, N. ]., Feb. 8. — Rudolph Stokes 
has engaged counsel and will secure a writ 
of replevin to get possession of a ring, val- 
ued at about $100. belonging to his wife, 
now in the possession of Cook & Jaques. 
-According to Stokes, he took the ring to 
Cook & Jaques to have a prong holding 
the stone fixed. The work was done, but 
when Stokes called for it, Air. Jaques, it 
is said, refused to give up the ring until 
Stokes had paid a prior bill which the firm 
held against him and his former partner in 
business. 

Stokes said he was willing to pay the 
cost of repairing the ring, but refused to 
assume the old debt; but he was not al- 
lowed to have the article unless he paid :n 
full. The defense will likely be interesting. 


Schneider’s soldering fluid is a substi- 
tute for borax which, although it has been 
on the market But six months, has com- 
mended itself highly to large and small 
manufacturers. It is sold in one, four, 
eight and 16 ounce bottles, at prices which 
will be found in the manufacturer’s an- 
nouncement. while larger quantities can 
be furnished at greatly reduced prices. It 
is made by Emil Schneider, Newark, N. J. 


February 13, 1901. 


THE JEWELERS’ CIRCULAR-WEEKLY. 


27 



IRVING 


A pattern with 
simple decora= 
tions and grace= 
ful outline, is 
offered for pur= 
chasers of crit= 
ical taste. 

This pattern is 
made complete, 
including table 
cutlery. 

All pieces are 
of medium 
weight and well 
balanced. Fin= 
ished in French 
Gray and bur= 
nished bright. 

Illustrations not' 
full size. 


WALLINGFORD, CONN 

226 FIFTH AVE., NEW YORK. 




26 


February 13, 1901. 


THE JEWELERS’ CIRCULAR-WEEKLY. 



Careful Inspection 

of every part before delivery is one of 
the precautions that make 

Trenton Watches 

keep as good time as much higher- 
priced movements. If 5'ou haven’t 
some in stock, you ought to order at 
once. They are trade-makers. 



No 52 — Trenton, 6-size, stem-winding, lever- 
settine, hunting, seven jewels, nickel damas- 
keened. compensation balance, screw bankings, 
straight-line lever escapement, hardened and 
tempered hair-sortng, quick train, and hts regu- 
lar lever or pendant set cases. 


SEND FOR PRICE-LIST. 


The Trenton Watch Co., 

TRENTON, N. J. 


Tariff Decisions & Hegulaliuns. 


Among the decLsion.s handed down the 
past week by the Board of Classification 
of the United States General Appraisers, 
were : 

Webb-Freyschlag Mercantile Co., Kansas City. 
Mo., imported small toilet pins with ornamental 
heads of colored glass in imitation of precious 
stones or jet, which belong to the class of articles 
commercially known a«i jewelry. Following re* 
pealed decisions of the Board, it is held that the 
goods are dutiable as assessed at GO per cent., 
under paragraph 434, act of 1897, and the protest is 
overruled which claimed that they were dutiable 
at 45 per cent. 

Andrew K. Steven. Xew York, imported a 
variety of goods, among which were bonnet or 
scarf pins with ornamental heads of cut glass, and 
in overruling protests again«it original assessment, 
the Board hold that these pins are dutiable as 
assessed at 45 per cent., under paragraph 193, act 
of 1S97, or at 60 per cent, as jewelry, under para- 
graph 434. 

Belcher & Loomis Hardware Co., Providence, 
imported wire, which was assessed at 45 per cent, 
as “clock and watch wire,” under paragraph 137 
of act of 1897. The importers claimed the wire 
to be smaller than Xo. 6 wire gauge, and as such 
dutiable at 40 per cent., under paragraph 137. They 
claimed that the wire is not one of the classes 
specially enumerated in paragraph 137. The Ex- 
aminer at the Port of X"e\v York stated that such 
wire had been uniformly assessed as watch or 
clock wire. The Board held that it was provided 
for in the paragraph referred to, and therefore sub- 
ject to duty as assessed. 

The American Express Co. imported merchan- 
dise which was returned as “300 gross garnet 
counter pivots for music box furnishings,” and 
valued at 300 francs. They were assessed at 50 
per cent., under paragraph 115, act of 1897. The 
protest claimed that the garnets were dutiable at 
10 per cent., or at 20 per cent., under paragraph 
435, as “precious stones advanced in condition or 
value from their natural state, * * * and not 
set,” or for “imitation of diamonds or other 




Xo. 206. 


No. 325. 




PITZELE & BASCHKOPF, 

fINE DIAMOND MOUNTINGS, 

I* ]Waideii L,ane, .... Blew York. 

Our styles ami prices can’t be beat. Call ami be convinced. 



No. 349. 


I>recious stones composed of glass or paste,” etc. 
“it appears,” said the Board in their decision attirm- 
ing the original decision, “that the articles are 
expressly designed for use as counter pivots or 
bearing surfaces in music boxes, or cap jewels or 
similar purposes in electrical instruments. ♦ * * 
They are cut cabochon or oval on one side and 
flat on the other; are polished; are about a quarter 
of an inch in diameter and are unsuitable for use 
as clock or watch jewels. * ♦ ♦ The protest is 
overruled and the assessment of duty affirmed.” 


Boston. 

Fred. F. Place, retailer, 81 Hanover St., 
froze his ears during the recent cold 
snap and has been kept at home for a 
few days. 

Included among the true bills pre- 
sented to Judge Sheldon, of the Superior 
Criminal Court, Saturday, were indict- 
ments against David Werblinsky, Samuel 
Goldstein and David Kerner, the three 
I men charged with stealing a safe contain- 
' ing jewelry and $l..')0fi in money from the 
1 store 0 ‘f ^lorse Bros., jewelers, 85 Lowell 
St., West End. 

i Buyers in town last week included; 
W. F. Newhall, Lynn, Mass.; J. H. Mc- 
Govern, Haverhill, Mass.; S. W. Baker. 
Rockland. Mass.; E. G. Wright, Putnam, 
Conn.; A. W. Avery. Plymontii. N. H.; 
A. J. Hunt. Adams. Mass.; H. A. Stone, 
Ayer, iMass. ; E. F. Welch, Westboro, 
Mass.; L. R. Hapgood, Dover, N. H.; 
P. H. McCarthy. Springfield. Alass. ; R. 
]\I. Cook, Marblehead, Mass.; F. M. 
Nichols, Taunton, Mass.; F. M. Padel- 
ford. Fall River, Mass. 


In commenting on the growing interest 
taken in ^Mexican agriculture. Farm Loans 
and City Bonds, a Chicago financial paper, 
says: “The profits in rubber, sugar, cof- 

fee, chocolate, etc., are unquestionably 
enormous, and the stockholders in some 
I of these companies which own plantations 
are beginning to receive tangible proof of 
that fact in the shape of dividends. A 
plantation which is in the hands of a com- 
pany which haS fully met the necessary 
conditions is the iMonteznma. This enter- 
prise will stand the closest investigation, 
and its shares are being taken by a con- 
I servative class of people, who consider it 
I a ver.v conservative investment and about 
i as safe as anything hut a Government 
' bond.” 

I 



In addition to our well=Known 
hand=carved jewelry we have 
the largest and most complete 
line of diamond = mounted 
goods in the market. 

We also make a large and 
choice assortment of 
Rosel Diamond and Pearl Set 
Rings with 

OPAL, TURQUOISE, DOUBLET 
and GARNET COMBINATIONS. 



Neptune and the Mermaids 


C. P. GOLDSMITH & CO., 

33 Gold street, New York . 


Salambo, 


February 13, 1901. 


THE JEWELERS’ CIRCULAR-WEEKLY, 


29 


Now 


Thoroughly Protected. 


THE MANUFACTURERS OF THE 


Larter Shirt Studs 


HAVE BEEN AWARDED BY THE PATENT OFFICE AT 

WASHINGTON, D. C., 

Two Additional Patents, 

BOTH UNDER DATE FEB. 5, 1901. 


See "Patent Dept., this Issue of ‘"The Jewelers" Circular=Weekly,” Page 48. 


We are now fully protected in the actual or in similar con= 
struction of the Larter stud, as the following dates and numbers 


of patents will prove : 


U. S. GOVERNMENT PATENT: 

Dec. 18, 1900, No. 11,878 
Feb. 5,1901, No. '667,574 
Feb. 5,1901, No. 667,631 

AND 

GREAT BRITAIN PATENT: 
July 15, 1899, No. 19,716 



THE LARTER STUD IS 
IN A CLASS BY 
ITSELF. 


There is no stock of shirt studs in the United States so large 
and complete — all with the successful Larter hack — as the lines 
we are carrying in 18k. gold, 14k. gold, also 10k. gold and extra 
quality 14k. plate. These last two lines are to be had through 
leading jobbers only. 


LARTER, ELCOX 6 CO., 

21 6 23 Maiden Lane, = = NEW YORK. 


30 


THE JEWELERS’ CIRCULAR-WEEKLY 


February 13, 1901. 


A.&B. 

HEADQIARTERS 

FOR 

Waltham Watches 

EVERY GRADE. 

One of our 

SPECIALTIES 

is a 

Waltham 0 size move= 
merit, nickel, 1 1 jewels 
in settings, Breguet 
hairspring; Htg., O. F. 
and Skylight. 

Sample sent for inspection if desired. 

I 

Avery & Brown, 

68 Nassau St., New York. 


Attleboro. ' 

; 

Saimiel Purringtoii, for years in cliarge 
of a department in the .shop of the Hor- 
ton, Angell Co., died last week, aged 46. 
The funeral took place on the Hhh. ^ 

There is informal talk relative to a dis- 
play of jewelry from the .Vttlehoros at the 1 
coming Pan-,-\merican E.xhibition. in Bttf- j 
falo. Something is likely to be done about I 
It within a few days. j 

hearing has been called before the 1 
Probate Court to arrange for the admis- ! 
sion of the will of the late Henry C. Re d. i 
of Attleboro, father of R. Curtis Read, of ! 
the New York oitice of J. C. Cummings & i 
Co. 

Louis C. Luther, of J. W. Luther & Co., 
and Samuel M. Ein.'^tein, of the Attleboro 
Mfg. Co., ptirchasetl last week for a large 
sum one of the leading sites on .\t- 
tleboro's main street. They propose to 
improve it greatly. 

James E. Blake, of the James E. Blake 
Co., starts on Thursday for California, part 
business and part pleasure. Two nights 
before his departure a party of 25 of the 
jewelers, with their wives, were to assemble 
at the home of William H. Garner, of the 
Dunbar. Leach, Garner Co., to give him 
a farewell reception. 

The annual report of the School Board 
recommends the introduction of manual 
training into the iniblic schools along lines 
calculated to develop skilled help for the 
jewelry factories. This is a subject which 
has been agitated by press, pulpit and of- 
ficials for the past year, and is apt to bear 
fruit at the March town meeting. 

Everett B. Bliss, of Bliss Bros., is serv- 
ing on the Grand Jury, in Taunton, with 
some of the most sensational crimes to be 
tried in the history of ^Massachusetts. 
Charles E. Bliss, his brother and partner, 
and Everett S. Horton, of the Horton, 
.\ngell Co., are witnesses against the most 


t angi rous set of thieves arrested here in 
a century. 

A marked change has come about in the 
office of Richards, Hill & Co. Fred. H. 
Hill has purchased the interests of J. Shep- 
ard and of Herbert L. Richards, and has 
taken the plant. He ha., associated with 
him as a financial helper and advisor 
James E. Blake, of the James E. Blake 
Co. The new firm will turn out high 
grade- chain. 

Fred. L, Bellows and Bernard Simms 
have started in bti.dness tosjether as Bel- 
lows & Simms. .Mr, Bellows has just re- 
signed from the traveling staff of McRae 
& Keeler after several years of unusually 
,uccessful work. Mr. Simms has been 
with Simms & Co. for 1 1 years. The lat- 
ter will run the ,hop and Mr. Bellows will 
carry the grip. 

bill was introduced into the Massa- 
chusetts Legislature which will iirobably 
be passed, according to present indica- 
tions. and will totich a large number of the 
concerns doing business in .\ttlehoro It 
was brought in by Representative Dean, 
of Wakefield, and recpiires that any 
person or persons doing business of any 
kind under a firm name other than their 
own shall be officially registered. 


Jewelers’ Gold Bars Withdrawn and Ex- 
changed. 

JVeek Ended Feb. p. iqoi. 

The U. -S. .Xs.'say Ofifice report: 

Gold bars exchanged for gold coin $213,817 82 

Gold bars paid depositors 66.078 17 


Total $279.895' 99 

Of this the gold bars e.xchanged for gold coin are 

reported bv the Sub-Treasnrv as follows: 

Feb. 4....! ; $78,217 

“ 5 0..544 

“ 6 26.539 

7 46,256 

“ 8 25.813 

9 37.435 


Total $219,804 




West Silver Co., = Taunton, Mass., 


MANUFACTURERS OF THE 


F. B. ROGERS BRAND 

OF SILVERWARE. 


Boston Office, 67 Chauncy Street. 


Heavily plated on extra"] hard White A 
metal. 

J^eW and attractive designs. ^ 

"Bright prices. ^ 

QUICK SHIPMENTS. | 

Send for Catalogue. 

New York Office, 80 Chambers Street. 


February 13, 1901. THE JEWELERS’ CIRCULAR-WEEKLY. 


31 


Canada Notes. 

Fred. Buscombe, jeweler, Vancouver, B. 
C., has been visiting the eastern markets 
and leaves in a few days for a European 
trip, returning home in May. 

R. G. Galbraith, representing Ryrie 
Bros., Toronto, has gone on a purchasing 
trip to New York and will place exten- 
sive orders for Spring novelties. 

David Reesor, Brandon, Man., whose 
store was recently destroyed by fire, has 
purchased the store in the same city re- 
cently occupied by the late T. F. Butcher, 
jeweler, and will shortly re-open business 
on an extensive scale. 

A fire in Montreal recently did a good 
deal of harm and Providence manufactur- 
ers lose a good customer, H. A. Nelson & 
Co., who decided to go out of business. 
Besides H. A. Nelson & Co., another firm 
who carried jewelry were burned out en- 
tirely, viz., Bernstein & Wolsey. 

M. G. Neiley, Winnipeg, Man., has sold 
out his jewelry business and gone to New 
York, where he will devote himself to an 
artistic career. His vocal abilities have 
secured a local recognition and he will 
take a course of instruction at some lead- 
ing conservatory and become a professional 
singer. 

Frederick Claringbowl, jeweler, Hamil- 
ton, has the sincere sympathies of the 
trade on account of the death of his wife, 
which occurred on the 1st inst. under pe- 
culiarly painful circumstances. Two days 
before Mrs. Claringbowl complained of 
illness and a doctor who was called 
in declared her to be suffering from 
an internal trouble requiring an operation. 
She was unable to withstand the shock 


and died shortly after having been operated 
on. 

On the 7th inst. William C. Hanbold, 
secretary of the International Watch Case 
Engravers’ Union, arrived in Toronto from 
New York, to endeavor to adjust the diffi- 
culty between the American Watch Case 
Co. and the Union. The manager of the 
company, Mr. Quigley, refused to submit 
the matter to arbitration. The Union will, 
consequently, lay the matter before the 
American Federation of Labor, with which 
it is affiliated, and the labor bodies of Can- 
ada, and in case the company refuse to re- 
cede from their position a prolonged strug- 
gle is likely to result. In the meantime the 
striking engravers have all secured posi- 
tions elsewhere and the question has re- 
solved itself into a fight over the status of 
the shop with regard to the Union, which 
Manager Quigley refuses to recognize. 


Mrs. C. Schomburg, the wife of a promi- 
nent jeweler of Columbus, Ga., died Feb. 
4, at Milledgeville. 

The jewelry establishment of J. N. 
Bucher, Hillsboro, Tex., was burglarized 
a few nights ago, and two pistols, a gold 
watch case, several razors, gold collar 
buttons and other items to the value of 
about $50 were stolen. 

Louis Maratsky, agent and clerk at 
Hudson, N. Y., has filed a petition in 
bankruptcy, with liabilities of $3,292 and 
assets of $20 in cash. He was formerly 
in the jewelry business, and in Decem- 
ber, 1892, he gave a bill of sale of his 
stock, valued at $3,500 to $4,000, to H. M. 
Smith & Co., 83 Nassau St., New York, 
to secure their claim of $3,800. 




* 

* 

* 

* 

* 

4 * 

4 * 

4* 

4» 

4* 

4< 

4* 

4* 

4< 

4< 

4< 

4< 

4< 

4* 

4- 

4* 

4< 

4* 

4*. 


STER^ BROS. & CO., 

IMPORTERS AND CUTTERS OF 

DIAMONDS, 


CUTTING WORKS: 
138-142 West 14th St., N. Y. 


CHICAQO, 

149 State Street. 


LONDON, 

29 Ely Place. 


68 Nassau St., 

NEW YORK. 






: 


♦ 

♦ 

♦ 


Yours For 

BUCKLES, 


OR FOR 


I Barrettes, 

Boa Chains, 
Brooches, 
Hat Pins, 
Purses, 

Fish-Scale 

Chatelaine Bags, 


♦ 

♦ 

♦ 

♦ 

♦ 

♦ 

♦ 

♦ 

♦ 

♦ 

♦ 

♦ 

♦ 

♦ 

♦ 

♦ 

♦ 

♦ 

I 


▼ 

I 


OR 


t Souvenir Spoons. 


We make everything for the 

♦ jeweler and will fill your or- 

♦ ders promptly. 

X Send us your wants. 

♦ A Postal Brings Samples. 

♦ 

♦ 

I Codding &Heilborn Co. 

NORTH ATTLEBORO, 

I MASS. 

I Sample Office, II Maiden Lane, 

1 NEW YORK. 


: 

.1 



DEITSCH BROS., 

MAKERS OF FINE LEATHER GOODS, 


ALSO 


IVORY, EBONY AND SHELL, 


14 East 17th Street, 


NEW YORK. 




32 


THE JEWELERS’ CIRCULAR-WEEKLY, 


February 13, 1901. 


WALTHAM WATCHES. 

16 Size, S. W., '99 Model, Pendant Setting. 

HUNTING OR OPEN FACE. 


RIVERSIDE MAXIMUS, Nickel; I 

2t Diamond and Ruby Jewels; Two Pairs Diamond Caps; Both Balance Pivots running on 
Diamonds; Raised Gold Settings; Jewel Pin Set without Shellac; Double Roller Escapement; 
Steel Escape Wheel; Exposed Pallets; Compensating Balance, Accurately Adjusted to Tempera- 
ture, Isochronism and Five Positions, and Carefully Timed ; Patent Breguet Hairspring, Hardened 
and Tempered in Form; Patent Micrometric Regulator ; Tempered Steel Safety Barrel; Exposed 
Winding Wheels; Gold Train; Fine Glass Hand-Painted Dial of Most Modem and Artistic Design. 

The superior construction of this movement adapts it to the most exacting service. 

RIVERSIDE, Nickel; 

17 Fine Ruby Jewels; Raised Gold Settings; Double Roller Escapement; Steel Escape Wheel; 
Exposed Pallets; Compensating Balance, Adjusted to Temperature and Three Positions; Patent ' 
Breguet Hairspring, Hardened and Tempered in Form; Patent Micrometric Regulator; Tempered i 
Steel Safety Barrel; Exposed Winding Wheels; Red Gold Centre Wheel. 

ROYAL, Nickel; 

17 Jewels; Red Gold Settings; Exposed Pallets; Compensatirg Balance, Adjusted to Temperature ; 
Patent Breguet Hairspring, Hardened and Tempered in Form; Patent Micrometric Regulator; 
Tempered Steel Safety Barrel; Exposed Winding Wheels; Red Gold Centre Wheel. 

No. 630, Nickel; 

17 Jewels; Red Gilded Settings; Exposed Pallets; Compensating Balance, Adjusted to Tempera- 
ture ; Patent Breguet Hairspring, Hardened and Tempered in Form; Patent Micrometric Regu- 
lator; Tempered Steel Safety Barrel; Exposed Winding Wheels; Red Gilded Centre Wheel. 

No. 620, Nickel; 

15 Jewels; Settings; Exposed Pallets; Cut Expansion Balance; Patent Breguet Hairspring, 
Hardened and Tempered in Form; Patent Micrometric Regulator; Tempered Steel Safety Barrel; 
Exposed Winding Wheels; Polished and Red Gilded Centre Wheel and Jewel Settings. 

No. 610, Nickel; 

7 Jewels; Expo.sed Pallets; Cut Expansion Balance; Patent Breguet Hairspring, Hardened and 
Tempered in Form; Tempered Steel Safety Barrel; Exposed Winding Wheels. 


Manufactured and Warranted by 

AMERICAN WALTHAM WATCH CO. 

WALTHAM, MASS. 


February 13, li)01. 


THE JEWELERS’ CIRCULAR-WEEKLY. 


33 


The 

" - - 

CIRCULAR 

^XNP. UOROI.OCICAU RBV16W./ 


tk'WOUR 32d Anniversary Number is a 
■ gem. It reflects honor upon the 
trade it represents,” writes to us a well 
known member of the trade. This is 
praise indeed, and makes us rest secure 
in the conviction that our work fulfilled 
all our promises, as well as all our high 
hopes. 


PUBLISHED EVERY WEDNESDAY BY 

THE JEWELERS’ CIRCULAR PUB’G CO., 


I F jewelers generally exercised as much 
coolness, courage and presence of 


CORBIN Building, 11 John St., Cor. Broadway, 
New York. 

telephone: cable address: 

1148 CORTLANDT. JEWLAR, NEW YORK. 


Vol. XLII. Feb. 13, 1901. No. 2. 


Ji JOURNAL DEVOTED TO THE INTERESTS OF JEW- 
ELERS, WATCHMAKERS, SILVERSMITHS, ELECTRO- 
PLATE MANUFACTURERS, AND ALL ENGAGED IN 
KINDRED BRANCHES OF INDUSTRY. 


mind as W. F. Kirkpatrick, of St. Joseph, 
Mo., did when, a few days ago, a poten- 
tial customer “flimflammed” some dia- 
monds from a paper of stones placed be- 
fore him for inspection, there would be 
fewer looses among them, and the light fin- 
gered fraternity would be more chary in 
their designs upon the jewelers. 


Member of the American Trade Press Association. 


Our editorial columns will contain our own 
opinions only, and we will present in other col- 
umns only what we consider of interest or value 
to our readers. Advertising matter will not be 
printed as news. 

Advertising rates in The Jewelers’ Circular- 
Weekly are lower, considering the number of 
tradesmen reached by its large circulation, than 
in any other jewelry journal. 

Notices of changes in standing advertisements 
must be received one week in advance; new mat- 
ter can be received up to Monday. 


INFORMATION FOR SUBSCRIBERS. 


Terms of Subscription, Postage Prepaid. 


PER ANNUM. 

United States and Canada, . - - $2.00 

Foreign Countries in Postal Union, - 4.00 

England and Colonies, ... 16s. 

Prance and Switzerland, - - - 20 fr. 

Germany, . . - - - 16 marks 

Single Copies, .... - .10 


New Subscribers can commence at any time. 

Payments for The Jewelers’ Circular-Weekly,, 
when sent by mail, should be made in a Post-Offico 
Money Order, Bank Check or Draft, or an Ex^ 
press Money Order or Registered Letter. All post- 
masters are required to register letters whenever 
requested to do so. 

Pay money only to authorized collectors having 
proper credentials. 

Returning Copies. Returning your paper will not 
enable us to discontinue it, as we cannot find your 
name on our books unless your address is given. 

Changing Address. In changing address always 
give the old as well as the new one. Your name 
cannot be found on our books unless this is done. 

Discontinuances. We will continue to send 
papers until there is a specific order to stop, in 
connection with which all arrearages must be paid; 
but such an order can be given at any time, to 
take effect at or after the expiration of the sub- 
scription. All such orders will be promptly ac- 
knowledged by mail. 

Liability. The courts have decided that all sub- 
scribers to journals are responsible until arrear- 
ages are paid in full and an order to discontinue 
has been received by the publisher. 


The JEWELERS’ CIRCULAR-WEEKLY 
IN EUROPE. 

Among the places in Europe where It Is on file are the 
following : 

LONDON— First Ave. Hotel, Holborn, E. C.; Hol- 
born Viaduct Hotel, Royal Hotel. 

PARIS — Hotel de L’ Athene, Rue Scribe. 

LEIPZIG — Handels-Zeitung fur die gesamte Uhren 
Industrie. 

BERLIN — Deutsche Uhrmacher Zeitung, Jager 
Strasse, 73. 

GENEVA — Journal Suisse D’Horlogerie. 

AMSTERDAM — Continental Club, Hotel Amstel. 
ANTWERP — Diamond Club, Rue de Pelican. 


De Beers Meeting I ^ another portion 

. „ . , * or this issue are 

and Price of . , 

printed copious ex- 

Diamonds. ^ ^ ^ ^ ^ 

speech of the chairman of the De Beers 
Consolidated Mines, Limited, at the an- 
nual meeting of that monopolistic corpor- 
ation just held. These extracts bear upon 
the past year’s output of diamonds, 
the earnings and the outlook for the 
shareholders’ interests. If any member 
of the trade has had a lurking feel- 
ing that the price of diamonds had 
reached its zenith, he will have this 
feeling entirely dissipated by a perusal of 
this speech. First the chairman says: 
“We have made a profit on the year of 
£581,148 only. Well, that sum, as com- 
pared with previous years, is rather a 
small one.” Then he speaks of the dis- 
satisfaction of shareholders at the deci- 
sion of the directors not to pay a dividend 
during the year. Further on he says: 
“We have not been able to increase our 
operations to the extent that we antici- 
pated.” Also, he speaks of a possible bo- 
nus to the shareholders later on, if cir- 
cumstances improve “in connection with 
the past year for which they have re- 
ceived no dividend.” Of course, we all 
know that it is the London syndicate that 
puts the price on the rough in its trans- 
ferrence to the cutter and dealer, but this 
price is really based upon the figure at 
which the output in South Africa is bought 
and the conditions prevailing in the oper- 
ations of the De Beers Co. The De 
Beers’s chairman’s report is not alto- 
gether satisfying to the shareholders, and 
it is certain that the company’s price per 
karat to the syndicate, for the next year, 
will be a high and stiff one, so that the 
company may be enabled to carry out 
their promises to the shareholders — a 
large dividend and a bonus. Under t'.iese 
conditions continued increases in the price 
of diamonds may be expected in rapid 
succession in a short time. 


Letters to the Editor. 


Every^ line of reading; matter in THE 
JEWELERS’ CIBCUEAR-WEEKET, with the 
exception of a few brief extracts from ex- 
changes, always properly credited, is written 
exclusively for this journal. Each issue of 
THE JEWELERS’ CIRCULAR-WEEKLY is 
copyrighted. Permission to quote is extended 
lo other publications provided such quota- 
tions lire properly credited- 


MAKERS OF TOWER CLOCKS. 

New York. Feb. 6, 1901. 
Editor The Jewelers’ Circular-Weekly; 

We note your article referring to old 
tower clocks, and would like to state that 
the clock at St. Mark’s Church, Ibth St. 


and Second Ave., is a Howard. We in- 
stalled it there in 1881. when the ohf 
clock was taken out. We have a great 
many other clocks which have been run- 
ning in towers since 1846. and would be 
glad at any future time you may wish to 
write up an article referring to the same, 
to give you a list and the histories. 

Yours very truly. 

The E. Howard Clock Co., 
W. R. Cadmus, managev. 


Samuel Baerncopf Indicted by the 
Grand Jury. 

Philadelphia, Pa., Feb, 11. — Samuel 
Baerncopf, until about a month ago a retail 
jeweler with two stores, one on 8th St. 
and another on 9th St., was indicted by the 
Grand Jury to-day on the charge of dispos- 
ing of the goods in the two stores witl; 
intent to defraud his creditors. The in- 
dictment was secured at the instance of 
the Jewelers’ Association and Board of 
Trade, of New York, and secretary D. L. 
Safford represented the Association before 
the Grand Jury. 

Baerncopf, through his attorneys, insti- 
tuted habeas corpus proceedings, two- 
weeks ago, and the hearing was held in 
the Court of Sessions, Friday, and denied. 
This left him to the action of the Grand 
Jury. 

Baerncopf was arrested the first week in 
January. He had disposed of the goo_dj 
in his stores a few days previous, for, it is- 
said, 18,000, which the Jewelers’ Associa- 
tion and Board of Trade claim was below 
the proper value. Creditors who are mem- 
bers of the As:,ociation have claims 
amounting to over $7,000, and the total lia- 
bilities are claimed to be more than $17,- 
000. and the correct valuation of the stock 
he sold as about $15,000. He claimed to 
have paid some of his creditors with the 
$8,000 received from the sale. 

Accounts of the case were published in 
The Circular-Weekly of Jan. 9 and 16. 


Death of William J. Lasher. 

Rome, N. Y., Feb. 10.— At his home, 
215 W. Thomas St., at 11.50 a. m., to-day, 
occurred the death of William J. Lashe’ , 
Sr., in his 64th year. Mr. Lasher had been 
in poor health the past year and in that 
time he had had two severe attacks of ill- 
ness. 

Mr. Lasher was born in Argyle, Wash- 
ington county, Oct. 16, 1837, being a son 
of John Lasher. He remained on his- 
father's farm till he was about 30 years old. 
when he disposed of his plot of ground, 
and with the proceeds of this and what he 
had saved he went to the village of Taberg, 
and there he put up a large store and 
stocked it with general merchandise. He 
branched out in business and opened a 
branch store in Peterboro, and this stoie 
he conducted for nearly 20 years. In con- 
nection with the store he liad a musical 
department. It was 22 years this Spring 
that Mr. Lasher disposed of his business 
in Taberg and moved with his family to- 
this city. He went into business, putting 
in a stock of nni.5ical instruments and jew- 
elry. 

The gold lorgnette worn on a long chain,, 
distinguishes the swellest street costumes. 


34 


THE JEWELERS’ CIRCULAR-WEEKLY. 


February 13, 1901. 


North Attleboro. 


Providence. 


W'inthrop F. Barden, of Chapman & 
Barden, has resigned his place as a mem- 
ber of the National Supreme Lodge of the 
American Benefit Society, to which he 
has been an able assistant. 

John B. Peck, foreman of the factory 
of H. F. Barrows lA Co., died on the 5th 
after an illness lasting les.^ than an hour. 
He went from his home in excellent health, 
but had been at the otiice but a few min- 
utes when he felt so ill that he returned 
home at once. Shortly after half past 
seven death came. Mr. Peck was a native 
of Dighton. Mas.'., being born there Oct. 
4. 1842. He was married in 186(i to Miss 
Harriet 1. Hopkins, of Pawtucket, and he 
made that city his home for seven years. 
In 1873 he removed to Providence, and af- 
ter two years of residence there they came 
to North .Attleboro. From 1875 until his 
death Mr. Peck was emjiloyed by H. F. 
Barrows & Co. From the year 1888 he 
had been their foreman, being up to that 
time head tool maker. He was for eight 
years chief engineer of the Fire Depart- 
ment and always active in town affairs. 
He was a member of Sumner Lodge of 
Knights of Pythias and of Prentiss M. 
W hiting Grand .Arm}- Post. A wife and 
daughter survive him. The funeral took 
place on Friday afternoon, and at the re- 
quest of the family the secret orders took 
no part, and the service was of the sim- 
plest nature. 


The three stone ring remains one of the 
enduring styles. 


Ma.x Z. Stein, jobber, New AMrk, called 
upon local manufacturers the past week. 

The Montana Diamond Co. are prepar- 
ing a large store for occupancy at 321 
Westminster St. 

E. L. .S])encer & Co. have engaged W. 
K. Boss as traveling representative, thus 
increasing their selling force. 

Frank P. Sherman, of the Lawton-Sher- 
man Co., is reported as convalescent from 
his recent illness with tyi)hoid fever. 

Alfred ATster & Co., makers of metal 
ornaments, 21 Mason St., have changed 
their firm name to .Alfred A'Yster & Sons. 

Thomas E. Carpenter, formerly a manu- 
facturer of rings in this city, has the sym- 
pathy of the trade in the loss he has suf- 
fered by the recent death of his wife. 

The jewelry shop of Herman Kern, with 
all the fittings for the manufacture of 
chains, at 5!l Page St., was sold at public 
auction at 10 o’clock Saturday morning, 
by order of the assignee. Mark Streiche’". 
The property was purchased by Charles W. 
Bowen, owner of the building, on the sec- 
ond floor of which the shop was located, 
for 8375. 

On account of the large number of the 
members of the Manufacturing Jewelers’ 
Salesmen’s Association who are making 
their western trips somewhat earlier than 
usual this season, the reunion and banquet, 
which was to have been held the latter part 
of the present month, will be postponed to 
a date in the coming month of March yet 
to be decided upon. 

George M. L. Mitchell, with the .-Albert 


Walker Co., wholesale jewelers, has been 
appointed referee in the bankruptcy case 
of George E. Blanchard, retail jeweler. East 
Greenwich, R, I., the filing of whose volun- 
tary petition in bankruptcy was noted in 
The Circul.ar-Weeki.y of Jan. 30. Mr. 
Blanchard has accejjted a position with 
Eastman & Co., in their jewelry store, 37 
Dorrance St., this city. 

.According to the City Hall records the 
chattel mortgage made by .Abraham Jac- 
obs to Leo Winograd has been discharged, 
as has also the mortgage for $300 by Lazar 
Jacobs to the same party. From the same 
source it is learned that Lazar Jacobs has 
given a chattel mortgage for $l,00o on all 
the stock, tools, etc., in the premises at 205 
W’illard .Ave. The effect of these transac- 
tions is that the small jewelry business at 
the above address is to be continued by 
Lazar Jacobs. 

.A thief accomplished a (juick job in the 
line of a window smashing robbery at the 
store of the Pawtucket Loan Co., 11 Rail- 
road -Ave., Pawtucket, shortly before miil- 
night, last Tuesday. The police officer on 
the beat says that everything was all right 
in the store at 11.11 o’clock, but a passing 
street car conductor four minutes later no- 
ticed that there was a hole broken through 
the front plate glass window. Seven 
watches aggregating in value $82.75 had 
been taken by the slick robber, who proba- 
bly took advantage of the noise of a passing 
freight train to turn the trick. 

.Among the certificates filed by corpor- 
ations at City Hall in accor-^ance with the 
annual requirement of the corporation law 
in this State, are statements by the Ludwig- 
Stern Co. and the Howard Sterling Co., 
the former makers of rolled gold platen 
jewelry at Blackstone and Gay Sts., and 
the latter manufacturers of silver ware at 
7 Eddy St. The statement of the Howard 
Sterling Co., which is signed by John J. 
Connly. president, Sullivan Ballou, secre- 
tary and treasurer, and John J. Banigan 
and Birney C. Parsons, directors, certifies 
that on Dec. 31, l!km. the amount of capi- 
tal stock fixed by vote of the corporation 
was $320,000, the amount of capital stock 
paid in was $242,0(>0, the value of personal 
assets of the corporation was $222,737.08 
and the total amount of debts and liabili- 
ties was $136,070.71. The statement of the 
Ludwig-Stern Co. is in substance that the 
amount of capital stock on Dec. 31. 19(>0, 
paid in was $24,0uo, the value of the cor- 
poration’s real estate according to the last 
assessment for city tax was $9,120, the 
value of their personal assets was $.39,499.- 
50 and the total amount of debts and lia- 
bilities was $25,680.71. 


Last Week’s New York Arri’vals. 


BOSTON, MASS., H. T. Belcher (Jordan, Marsh 
& Co.), 8 Greene St. 

CHIC.\GO, ILL., B. Schuette. Astor. 
LYNCHBURG, V.\., H. F. Silverthorn. Bartholdi. 
.MINNE.M’OI.IS, MINN., C. Kasmusen. .\slor. 
PITTSBURGH. PA., T. Kaufman (Kaufman 
Bros.), 648 Broadway. 

ROCHESTER, N. Y., E. Yogt, Victoria. 

SAN FR.VNCISCO. C.\L., J. Isaacs, Sinclair. 
SCRANTON. PA., N. B. Levy (N. B. Levy & 
Bro.), Herald Square. 

UTICA, N. Y., E. S. Wineburgh, Herald Square. 
WORCESTER. :\L\SS., J. C. Freeman. Grand 
Union. 


ON MEMORANDUM 





Cross & Beguelin 


Importers and Cutters of Dianumds and Precious Stones 

43 Rue de Meslay, PARIS zrSS^Cortfandt ^7 hAuideU LaUe , hJEl4^ YOR.10 




February 13, lyui. 


85 


THE JEWELERS’ CIRCULAR-WEEKLY. 


New York Notes. 

The Lane presented its usual holiday 
appearance Tuesday. All the stores and 
•oftices were closed in honor of Lincoln’s 
Birthday. 

Gilbert T. Woodhull, of Mount & 
.Woodhull, 26 Maiden Lane, sailed on the 
Lucania, Saturday, for a business trip to 
London, Paris and Amsterdam. 

The annual meeting of the Keystone 
Watch Case Co. stockholder^ was held 
YTdnesday last, at the company’s office, 23 
Maiden Lane. The officers of last year 
were re-elected. 

Leo Veit, for 12 years- with his brother, 
B. Veit, importer and dealer of watch 
materials, 13 Maiden Lane, has been ad- 
mitted to partnership in the business. The 
new firm will be known as B. & L. Veit. 

David Goodfriend, bookkeeper for Good- 
friend Bros., 13 Maiden Lane, was mar- 
ried. Wednesday evening last, to Miss Bea- 
trice Schwartz, at the home of the bride’s 
parents and in the presence of a good 
representation of Maiden Lane members 
of the trade. 

A meeting of East Side jewelry ped- 
dlers and others interested in the detec- 
tion of the murderers of Meyer Weisbard' 
was held last week, but nothing definite 
materialized. Efforts are still being made 
to raise the $1,500 reward to stimulate the 
arreM of the guilty party. 

The case of Elias M. Pilzer, bankrupt, 
who petitioned for a discharge from all 
his debts in bankruptcy, came up in the 
United States District Court, before 
Judge Brown, Wednesday, but as objec- 
tions were made to granting the petition; 
the matter went over until Feb. 20. 

In a report of a meeting of the credi- 
tors of Solomon Bros. & Gross, at Prov- 
idence, Jan. 25, a statement was made in 
error regarding the dissolution of part- 
nership. S. Richard Gross retired from 


the firm Jan. 31, 1901, not Jan. 1, 1901, 
and the business has since been in the 
hands of Eli Solomon. 

Among the creditors of George L. 
Davidson, who has filed a petition in 
bankruptcy, with liabilities of $29,233 and 
assets of .$4,600, are the following; Mrs. 
Theresa Lynch, $2,595; Thomas Kirkpat- 
rick, $3,000; E. M. Gattle, $687; all for 
jewelry. Mr. Davidson lives at Hotel 
Grenoble and is not in business. 

The examination into the affairs of M. 
J. Davidow, bankrupt jobber, late of 510 
Broadway, was continued before Referee 

I in Bankruptcy Miller, last Wednesday. 

I Attorney G. H. Crawford went on with 
the questioning of Mr. Davidow along 
the lines of the preceding e.xamination, as 
reported in The Circul.vr-Weekly last 
week. The examination will be con- 
tinued this afternoon. 

The first meeting of the creditors of 
the bankrupt firm of A. S. & S. I. Koplik, 
formerly engaged in the jewelry business 
at 106 W. 125th St., who were adjudi- 
cated bankrupts on Jan, 7. will be held at 
the office of Macgrane Coxe, referee in 
bankruptcy. 63 Wall St., Feb. 28, at 10.30 
o’clock .v.M., at which time creditors may 
prove claims, appoint a trustee, examine 
the bankrupts, etc. A summary of the 
filed schedules of this firm was published 
in The Circular-Weekly last week. 

The Merchants’ Association of New 
York have notified the railway lines of 
the southwest that they will put into ef- 
fect reduced rates for members of the 
Merchants’ Association from all points on 
one of those lines. These rates will apply 
from Texas to New York by way of St. 
Louis, Mo. These reduced rates will be 
effective from Feb. 13 to 17, inclusive, and 
March 1 to 4, inclusive, the return limit 
being for 30 days from the date of the 
sale of the ticket; the general terms and 
conditions being practically the same as 


those put into effect by the Trunk Line 
.Vssociation and the Central Passenger 
•A.ssociation for similar concessions, as 
noted in The Circular-Weekly last 
week. These dates are the same as the 
dates previously granted by the lines of the 
Central Passenger Association. 

A handsome silver service has just been 
completed by the Whiting Mfg. Co. which 
will be presented to Lieut. R. P. Hobson 
by some of his friends. The set consists 
of a tray and five pieces, all of which are 
decorated in nautical style and engraved 
with scenes connected with the historic 
deed in this naval officer’s career. The 
tray, having more room, is more elabor- 
ately engra\^ed and etched than the other 
pieces. On the tray is this inscription: 
‘‘Presented to Lieutenant Richmond 
Pearson Hobson by his friends and ad- 
mirei'a in recognition of his bravery and 
heroism in the sinking of the collier Mer- 
rimack, in Santiago Harbor, June 3, 1898." 
This testimonial is now on public exhibi- 
tion at the store of the Whiting Mfg. 
Co., Broadway and 18th St., where the 
workmanship is receiving much attention 
from trade people and others. 

The two handled silver loving cup made 
by Tiffany & Co. and presented to Henry 
Martyn Baird, Professor of Greek, by the 
Alumni Association of New York Uni- 
versity, is in the form of the old amphora 
or wine bottle. It is llj inches high. The 
body of the cup is encircled with a band 
of Greek figures in bold relief; on the 
front of the cup is the seal of the University 
with a branch of laurel ; on the back is 
the inscription, in the antique square let- 
tering: “Presented to Henry Martyn 

Baird, LL.D., L.H.D., of the class of ’50, 
by the Alumni Association of New York 
University, in commemoration of the 50th 
anniversary of his graduation. New York, 
February 7th, 1901.’’ A Greek treatment 
of the ivy leaf of friendship surrounds the 


1 C. DORFLINQER & SONS, 

i Manufacturers of Fine Glassware. 

i EVERYTHING IN PLAIN AND CUT CRYSTAL FOR THE TABLE, 

i 915 Broadway, NEW YORK. 36 Murray Street. 


1851 . 


1901 


TheChatham N ATioNAL Bank, New Y ork. 


CAPITAL STOCK, 
UNDIVIDED PROFITS, 


a. P. DOREMUS, Cashier. 


GEO. M. HARD, President. 


$ 150,000 

980,000 


TV. H. STRAW N, Ass’t Cashier. 












THE JEWELERS’ CIRCULAR-WEEKLY. 


February 13, lOl'l. 


3(1 

Our Plan. 

Selling’ direct to the retail je’weler, j 
thus allowing him the profit of the , 
middleman ; giving him special pro- ' 
tection, assisting him in placing and 
advertising goods at our expense, 
making to order any special design, 
emblem, monogram, photograph or 
other idea suggested by a customer 
have made the Bell Gold-Filled Watch 
Case so popular with the legitimate 
retail jeweler, as is evidenced by the 
rapid increase in sales. 



Any emblem or monogram, plain or en- 
gine-turned, made to order for from 25 cents 
to |i.oo over price of plain polished case. 


The “Bell Special” is the only gold- 
filled case made with the amount and 
quality of gold stamped in the case. It is 
guaranteed for 35 years. 

BUY OF THE MAKER. 

The Bell Watch Co. 

Factory, Mansfield, 0. 

GENERAL OFFICES, 

Champlain Bldg., CHICAGO, ILL. 


DEMAREST & ECKERSON, 

Formerly with B. & W. B. SMITH. 

ARTISTIC SHOW CASES 

and 

STORE Fixtures, 

435 & 437 Seventh Ave., NewYork. 

ALL WORK FIRST-CLASS IN EVERY PARTICULAR. 

TKLEI-HONE C.ALL, 3SSV 3Slh ST. 


top of the vase. Prof. Baird has filled the 
chair of Professor of Greek at the New 
York University for 41 years. The cup 
was formally presented by the Rev. Dr. 
John Reid, ’70, at the annual dinner of the 
.\lumni Association, at the Hotel Savoy, 
Xew York, Feb. 7. 

The Eaton & Glover Co. have secured 
additional room adjoining their offices, 87 
Nassau St., which they will shortly oc- 
cupy. 

Si. Frankel, of Joseph Frankel's Sons, 
will sail next Saturday on the Kaiscrin 
Maria Theresa, for Genoa. Mr. Frankel 
will spend some time in Nice, returning 
to this country next .A.ngust. 

Adolph Luthy has retired from Abel, 
Luthy & Co.. (14 John St., by mutual agree- 
ment. The business will be continued by 
John A. and Edward C. Abel under the 
firm name of Abel Bros. & Co. Mr. Luthy. 
who was designer in the late firm, will be 
succeeded in that capacity by an expe'T 
German designer, employed for that pur- 
pose. 

Conrad Schickerling, 9-11-13 Maiden 
Lane, has admitted his brother Alfreil to 
partnership, and under the style of Schick- 
erling Bros, will continue business, manu- 
facturing, mounting and selling high grade 
diamond jewelry. The firm will occupy 
larger quarters in the Jewelers’ Court 
building, 51-53 Maiden Lane, as soon as 
that building is completed. 

Samuel Carpenter, for some years a jew- 
eler of Flushing, L. I., died at his home 
there, Wednesday, aged 85 years. He was 
of an inventive mind, and an isochronal 
movement for watches, which also includes 
a movement known as a double im- 
pulse chronometer, a device which les- 
sened the power necessary to run a watch 
at least one-half, was developed from his 
brain. He had not been in business for 
several years. 


THE LATEST 
American 
Movement 

ON THE MARKET. 

$5.00 

Every One Guaranteed. 

Naught Size, Hunting. 

7 Jewel, Nickeled Damaskeened, Cut Expan- 
sion Balance, Straight Line Lever Escapement, 
Visible Pallets, Hardened and Polished Pinions, 
Hard Enamel Dial, Stem Wind and Set. 

SUFFOLK WATCH CO., 

37 & 39 Maiden Lane, New York City. 



f 


I 


Philadelphia. I 

S. Kind & Son are having alterations 
made in their store on N. 8th St. 

J. W. Clark, formerly a retail jeweler 
of Croyden, Pa., has o])ened a retail store 
on Mill St.. Bristol. 

William H. Ritzmann. watchmaker, with 
J. E. Caldwell & Co., was married last 
week to Miss Pauline Salm. 

Henry Van Acken. Sr.. 1424 N. 10th 
St., has been drawn as a grand juror for 
the February term of Court. 

G. A. Schaah, Shenandoah. Pa., was at- 
tacked while at dinner. Sunday, by a mad 
dog. He lield the dog at bay until a po- 
liceman arrived. 

William F. Michael, lately with Davis 
& Galt, has accepted a position with Ro’ler 
& Speidel. manufacturing silversmiths, 
1048 Chestnut St. 

Herman Nagele, watchmaker, Arch and 
13th Sts., has secured the contract to keep 
in repair the clocks in the various depart- 


ments of the City Hall. 

George Kerscli has resigned his posi- 
tion as manager of Wanamaker's repair 
department to enter the jewelry business ■ 
in Newark with his father. 

Among the jewelers who were promi- 1 
nent at the German-American hall. Mon- 
day, were: Max Brueckman. Isaac Herz- 

berg and Charles Diesinger. 

Walter Chattin, of the firm of Oliver & ’ 
Chattin, jewelers’ supplies, 8th and San- 
som Sts., has gone on a gunning trip to 
Kentucky. Mr. Chattin is rather a splen- \ 
did marksman. 

The stock and fixtures of the retail jew- 
elry store of M. B. Allehach, deceased, 
1328 Walnut St., which remain unsold i 
Feb. 20, will be closed out at public anc- ' 
tion on that day. 

J. Frank Alice, jeweler, Dover, Del.. 
])resented to Lieutenant - Governor Can- 
non. last week, a handsome jeweled gavel. 
The wood that it was made of was taken > 
from the oldest elm tree in Delaware. 

E. P. Ledos. the Newark manufacturer 
of jewelers' materials, during his last visit 
here presented Common Councilman Hen- ■ 
derson, of this city, with a jeweled badge ; 
of the Order of Elks, in appreciation of 
tlie latter's hospitality during the annual 
convention last Summer. 

A. Marks, optician, of New York, who i 
was charged with selling worthless specta- j 
cles to residents of Coatesville, Parksburg 
and other small Pennsylvania towns, has'.j 
been rescued from tlie clutches of the law^ t 
by his brother, i\I. Marks, of New York.' , 
The cases were settled by the return of’'' 
the money to the victims and the payment [■ 
of all costs. Marks is alleged to have been'i 
operating in many places. In Parksburg ; 
he secured ^;0() for a pair of spectacles. 


The 

Mercantile National Bank 

OF THE CITY OF NEW YORK, 

BROADWAY AND DEY STREET, 

Solicits Accounts from the Jewelry Trade. 


February 13, 1901. 


THE JEWELERS’ CIRCULAR-WEEKLY. 


37 


Roy Phillips, formerly with i\l. B. Al'e- 
hach, deceased, has accepted a position 
with H. Fitton, retail jeweler, Atlantic 
City, N. J. 

Richard Weyl, 706 Chestnut St., agent 
•of the Meriden Cutlery Co., left Monday 
on an extended traveling trip through the 
State. 

Ojcar Kind, of S. Kind & Son, 
jewelers. V'28 Chestnut St., was married 
last week to Miss Theresa B. Katz, daugh- 
ter of klr. and Mrs. Marcus Katz, at the 
Mercantile Club. Frank and Philip Kind 
were ushers. 

Among the retail jewelers who were in 
town last week were: Charles A. Cham- 

herlain, Flourtown, Pa.; J. W. Clark, Bris- 
tol, Pa.; Charles Kohler, Norristown. Pa. ; 
William Beck. Vineland, N. J. ; W^. L. 
Roberts. Wilmington. 

The Jewelers’ Club, of this city, have had 
so many landlords during the past few 
weeks that the Board of Governors are at 
a loss to know whom to pay this month. 
The property again changed hands last 
week, when Dr. William Thomson bought 
it. 

The change in the personnel of H. 
Muhr's Sons, which was forecasted in The 
Circul.\r-Weekly some months ago, has 


at last materialized. Ralph Binder, who 
has had the diamond department of the 
store lor the last 20 years, severed his con- 
nection with the firm Saturday. The dia- 
mond corner will hereafter be conducted 
by Mr. Kipling. Victor Binder, who 
was associated with his brother in the 
conduct of the diamond corner for seven 
years, severed his connection with the 
firm several weeks ago. It is rumored 
that Ralph and Victor Binder will start 
a retail store in a few weeks.. Both are 
widely known in the trade and high'y es- 
teemed. 


Springfield, Mass. 

Springfield has two new stores of inter- 
est to the jewelry trade. One is the New 
Era Diamond Palace and the other is an 
optical company who have secured a prom- 
inent location on Main St. and have put in 
a splendid line of goods. 

Walter L. Stannard, a member of Hayes, 
Stannard & Co., is last year’s champion for 
long distance riding, having covered some- 
thing over 38,000 miles, or several thous- 
and miles more than his next nearest 
competitor. Most of the riding was done 
in connection with his business, his part 
in the firm being in going about to see 
customers and collecting. 



We are considered to have the most "unique” assort- 
ment of high-class Art Novelties shown to the trade 
this season. 

Clocks, Bronzes, 

Jeweled Photo Frames, 

Smokers’ Articles, 

Etc., Etc. 

SYDNEY J. MANBY, 

IMPORTER OF FANCY GOODS AND ANTIQUES, 

30 East 29th St., New York. 

We issue no Catalogues. 







at 


rop 


DROP PRESSES 


PLAIN AND AUTOMATIC. 

What the Je'welers and Silver- 
smiths need for the coming 
season. Plain Drops for work 
that has to be daped. Auto- 
matics for Flat Back and 
Shallow work. 


POWER PRESSES, 
ROLLING NULLS, 

WITH ROLLER BEARINGS, 

WIRE DRAWING 
MACniNERY. 


MossbergandGranvilleMfg,Go. 


150 Nassau Street, 


NE.W YORK. 








38 


THE JEWELERS’ CIRCULAR-WEEKLY. 


February 13, 1901. 


INDEX TO ADVERTISEHENTS. 


Special Notices 


tt. Henry 

Adltr. L.. & Son 

Ahrrnteldt, Charles. & S n 60 

Aikin. Lambert vS: Co 69 

Aikin, Lambert Jewelry Co 59 

Allen & Tonassohn 64 

American W altham Watch Co 32 

American Watch Case Co 41 

Arnsiein Bros. ^ Co 64 

Attleboro Chain Co 5S 

Avery & Brown 30 

Baker, George M 64 

Ballou. B. A.. & Co 49 

Bank. John A.. & Bro 58 

Barlow Alfg. Co 22 

Bassett Jewelry Co 63 

Bell Watch Co 36 

Berge, J. & H 52 

Higney. S. O.. & Co 23 

Billings. Chester. & Son 11 

Blair's Fountain Pen Co 24 

Blancard Co 63 

Bonner & Co 52 

Bowden, J. B.. & Co 40 

Bradley Polytechnic Institute 2 

Bryant, M. B-, & Co 52 

Carter. Hastings & Howe 11 

Chatham National Bank 35 

Chicago College of Optics 55 

Citroen, S. C., & Co 45 

Codding & Heilborn Co 31 

Cohn, j: J... 49 

Columbus W atch Co 24 

Crescent Watch Case Co 6 

Cross & Beguelin 24, 34 

Crossman, Charles S., & Co 14 

Crown and Lion Watch Ca-^es 52 

Day, Clark & Co 1< 

Deitsch Bros 31 

De Lara, D. C 14 

Demarest &: Eckerson 36 

Diamond Point Pen Co 57 

Dominick & Haff 20 

Dorflinger, C., & Sons 35 

Dubois Watch Case Co 40 

Dwenger, Charles L 62 

Eichberg & Co 17 

Eisenmann Bros H 

EHassof Bros. & Co 13 

Fahys, Joseph, & Co 57 

Fera vS: Kadison 15 

Field ^ Beattie 52 

Thendnre W. Bro. Co 2 


Francis, A. E 43 

Frankei’s Sons, Joseph 17 

Freund, Henry, & Bro 22 

Friedlander, K-, L. & M 64 

Frolichstein & England 45 

Garreaud & Griser 14 

Gattle, Ettinger & Hammel 64 

Goldner, S 14 

Goldsmith, C. P-. & Co 28 

Goldsmith, Leo 64 

Goodfriend Bros I'o 

Grinberg, Adolf J., Co 24 

Haack, John 2 

Harris 8: Harrington 64 

Hayward, Waller E 63 

Hedges, William S., & Co 10 

Heintz Bros 41 

Hermann &. Co 45 

Hirsh & Hyman 15 

Hooper, George E 63 

Howard Sterling Co 22 

Hraba, Louis W 59 

Illinois Watch Case Co 47 

Improved Seamless Wire Co 64 

Jackson, John J., Co 62 

Jacot Music Box Co 57 

Jewelers’ Court 57 

Jurgensen, Jules 57 

Kahn, L. Sc M.. Sc Co 64 

Kent Sc Woodland 2 


Ketcham 8: -McDougall 59 

Klein Bros 5S 

Klein, F. C., & Bro 45 

Kleinschmidt, Howland Co 13 

Knowles, Dr 55 

Knowles. J. B. & S. M.. Co 20 

Kohlbusch, Herman, Sr 14 

Kohn. Alois, & Co 52 

Krementz & Co 19 

Larter, Eleox & Co 29 

Lelong. L., & Bro 64 

Lewis, Fred. W., & Co 10 

Lissavier Sc Co 2 

Loeb, William, Sc Co 59 

Lor?ch, Albert, & Co 64 

Mabie, Todd & Bard 59 

MacDonald, Pirie 40 

Malliett, Maxwell & Ross 15 

Mann, Ignatz 62 

Manby, Sydney J 37 

Marx & Brod 15 

Mathey Bros., Mathez & Co 59 

Mauser Mfg. Co 20 

Mendes Diamond Cutting Factories 41 

Mercantile National Bank 36 

Montezuma Plantation 46 

Mossberg Sc Granville Mfg. Co 37 

Mount Sc Woodhull 13 

Murray, Dan I 45 

Myers, St F., Co 48 

New England Watch Co 41 

Nimschke, L, W 48 

Nissen, Ludwig, & Co 10 

Noble, F. H.. & Co 47 

Oppenheimer Bros. Sc \’eith 14 

Oppenheimer* H. E., & Co 64 

Ostby & Barton Co 10 

Patek, Philippe & Co ; 11 

Pitzele & Baschkopf 28 

Ponzoni, C 2 

Providence Stock Co 63 

Reddall, John W., Sc Co 20 

Reinewald, Henry 2 

Reisner. L. C., & Co 3 

Revell, A. H., 8: Co 64 

Rogers, Simeon L. & George H., Co 5 

Roseman, A 17 

Knmpp, C. F., & Sons 63 

Saunders, John F 10 

Schneider, Emil 48 

Schulz & Rudolph 57 

Scott, S. C., Mfg. Co 42 

Sherwood, John W'., & Co 36 

Smith, Alfred H., Sc Co 12, 18 

Smith, W iiliam. & Co 57 

Spencer, E. L., 8: 'Co 58 

Stern Bros. Sc Co 31 

Sternau, S., 8c Co 43 

St. Louis Button Co 46 

Strasburger’s Son, Louis 8c Co 18 

Strauss, Jacob, 8c Sons 18 

Street, George O., 8c Sons 13 

Suffolk Watch Co 36 

Sussfeld, Lorsch Sc Co 57 

Towle Mfg. Co 47 

Trenton Watch Co 28 

Trout, Charles L., 8c Co 22 

N'alfer, S., & Co 41 

Vatier, Ernest 58 

Wallace, R., Sc Sons Mfg. Co 27 

W'arner & Swasey Co 55 

W'ashburn, George W 38 

West Silver Co 30 

Wheeler, Hayden W., Sc Co 16 

White, W iiliam A., 8c Sons 39 

W hite, N. II., 8c Co 7 

Whiting Sc Davis 21 

Wicke 8c Co 62 

Wittnauer, A 25 

Woodcock, W . F. A 39 

Wood, John R., 8c Sons 4 

Wood Sc Hughes 62 



THE WASHBUHr* { THE WASHBURN 

MAGIC N U T, I 

PERFECTED, y 

For Ear Studs, Scarf Pina, Stnds, &c. < 

HOLDS SECURELY ON SMOOTH WIRE. > orMM. <Som. 

Made in 18 k., lik., 14 k. put*, SUyer And Aluminum. < FOR BROOCHES 
DESCRIPTIVE CIECULAB ON APPLICATION < Can be applied to 

OEO. W, WASHBURN, Sole Maonfacturer, \ any work wbere Pin 
12-16 John Street, New York. ? Ton^mea are used. 


Rates 75C. per insertion for notices not ex- 
ceeding 3 lines (.35 words); additional words 
3 cents each. Payable invariably In advance. 

Display cards on this page $3.00 per inch. 

Under the heading of SITUATIONS 
WANTED on this page, advertisements will 
be Inserted for One Cent a Word, each inser- 
tion. Minimum charge, 35 cents. This offer 
refers to SITUATIONS WANTED ONEY- 
Payable In advance. 

In all cases if answers are to be forwarded, 
10 cents extra to cover postage mnst be en- 
closed. 


Situattona Manteb. 


1^ ANTED — Position by young man as assistant 
watchmaker; can give references. C. Walton 
Phillips, Tiptonville, Tenn. 


TAIAMOND setter wants position; first-class 
English and American references; thread work 
a specialty. P. S., care Jewelers’ Circular-Weekly. 


T^.-VNT a situation as watchmaker in northern 
States; had 25 years’ experience; reliable ref- 
erence. R. Hooper, 58 .\ustin St., Cambridgeport, 
Mass. 


TDOSITION by young man; good knowledge of 
jewelry business, with course in optics; would 
like more experience in fitting. Address. Box 67. 
Castleton. N. Y. 


ANTED — Permanent position by a first-class 
watchmaker; fine set of tools; best of ref- 
erences. Address, “Permanent,” care Jewelers’ 
Circular-Weekly. 


SITUATION W.-\NTED, either on road or in 
store; five years’ experience on road and 10 
years’ in store; best references. Address, L., care 
Jewelers’ Circular-Weekly. 


"yOUNG MAN who can do jobbing and clock 
^ repairing would like position to learn watch 
repairing; I am also a good salesman. Address. 
“256,” care Jewelers’ Circular-Weekly. 


■\y ANTED — Position by a youth, 19, who has 
’’ had some experience in a Maiden Lane dia- 
mond house; good recommendation. Address. 
“Cedric,” care Jewelers’ Circular-Weekly. 


PRACTICAL WATCHMAKER, 10 years’ ex- 
^ perience. desires a change; A1 references; good 
salesman; can engrave some; railroad watch ex- 
perience. .Address, R. M., care Jewelers’ Circular- 
Weekly. 


pNGRAVER — A studious, industrious and intel- 
ligent young man, with some experience in 
jewelry repairing, wishes a permanent position. 
Address, “Reliable,” care Jewelers’ Circular- 
Weekly. 


NJOUNG L.ADY BOOKKEEPER and stenog- 
^ rapher, with five years’ experience in whole- 
sale diamond and watch house, seeks position ; 
references unquestionable. “Competent,” care 
Jewelers’ Circular-Weekly. 


ly ANTED — By an experienced and well-known 
salesman, a manufacturer’s line to sell to 
department stores and jobbers; New York and 
vicinity, including New England, if desired. .Ad- 
dress, S. C., care Jewelers’ Circular-Weekly. 


ly.ANTED — 'By a young man, a position as 
'' traveling salesman for a manufacturing jew- 
eler; is acquainted with first-class retail trade on 
the line of New York Central and west of Buffalo 
and Pittsburgh. .Address, W. E., care Jewelers’ 
Circular- Weekly. 


elTUATION WANTED— By a good watch- 
^ maker to finish the trade; three years’ experi- 
ence; graduate optician; excellent salesman; 
speaks the Finnish and English languages; -A1 
references; salary, $15 per week. Address, J. E. 
H., care Jewelers’ Circular-Weekly. 


CITU.ATION W.ANTED — Practical superinten- 
dent, with long experience on flat and hollow 
ware, desires position or would like to meet 
parties wishing to open new factory; systematizing 
and cost reducing are special features of my man- 
agement. .Address. “System," care Jewelers" Cir- 
cular-Weekly. 


February 13, 1901. THE JEWELERS’ CIRCULAR-WEEKLY. 


:5!) 


Ibelp Mantct). 


W ANTED— A good watchmaker, single, ^ that 
can do plain engraving and jewelry jobs; 
write particulars and salary in first letter. John 
J. Ferguson, Alexandria, La. 


ANTED, AT ONCE — First-class optician, 
'' watchmaker and fair engraver; single; must 
stand investigation as to character and ability; 
answer at once. Strickland ik Co., Fond Du Lac, 
\\ is. 


■pjiAMOND SE'^TTER’S APPRENTICE wanted 
by first-class house; only fine platinum pieces 
set; will teach trade for consideration of $500; 
weekly salary paid. Address, O. N., care Jewelers’ 
Circular-Weekly. 


A GOOD OPPORTUNITY for a young man 
who is well acquainted with both the New 
York jobbing trade and local retail trade. Ad- 
dress, “Knowledge,” care Jewelers’ Circular- ' 
Weekly. 


ANTED — First-class watchmaker and good 
letter engraver; steady employment; only 
first-class man may reply; send sample of engrav- 
ing. Address S. S., care Jewelers’ Circular- 
Weekly. 


ANTED — Ten first class salesmen to carry as 
a side line our well known gold filled rings; 
liberal commission; deposit of $50 required for 
samples. Address, Arnstine Bros. & Mier, 50 Euc- 
lid Ave., Cleveland, O. 


ANTED — Watchmaker, engraver, jeweler, all- 
around helper; $12 per week, steady job, 
nice town, New York State; send sample of en 
graving, photo and full particulars. Address, D. 
E., care Jewelers’ Circular-Weekly. 


^Y^ANTED — A first=class traveler, well 
acquainted with the gold jewelry 
trade in New England, New York State 
and Pennsylvania; must have good rec- 
ommendations. Address, “ New Eng== 
land,” care Jewelers’ Circular- Weekly. 


'YY^f'^TED — An experienced traveler 
with an established trade in New 
York City and suburbs to sell loose 
diamonds, watches, and jewelry; state 
experience, salary expected, etc. Ad= 
dress, W. B., care Jewelers’ Circular- 
Weekly. 


Buainees ©pportunities^ 


T BUY JEWELRY STOCKS— Retailers wish- 
ing to dispose of surplus or entire stock of dia- 
monds, watches and jewelry will find me a quick, 
cash, strictly confidential buyer. Gus. Bronner, 
22 and 24 Lispenard St., New York city. 


jfor Sale. 


CpOR SALE — Leatheroid jewelry trunk; Crouch 
^ Sc Fitzgerald make; canvas cases and trays; 
in fine condition; cheap. S. & E. Levi, 169 
Wooster St., city. 


■p^OR SALE — A bargain, a complete set of jew- 
elers’ fixtures, consisting of wall and coun- 
ter cases, tables, brackets, safe, etc. For particu- 
lars write to Blocher Bros., Frederick, Md. 


Mantcb to purchase. 


ANTED — Wall cases for displaying 
’’ ’ silverware by New York city firm. 
Address, with full particulars, stating 
price, dimensions, etc., B. D., care Jew- 
elers’ Circular=Weekly. 


Xeoal IBotlce. 


I^OTICE — The firm of Klein, Kraus & Co.. Fifth 
Ave. and Market St., Fittsburgh, Pa., having 
dissolved, it is requested that all claims against 
them be presented at once, and all accounts due 
them be liquidated without delay. 


Ho Xet. 


COUTHW'EST corner of 125th St. and Madison 
^ Ave. to rent at a very low figure; splendid 
location for high-class jeweler. For full particu- 
lars inquire of Charles Griffith Moses & Bro., 157th 
St. and Amsterdam Ave., New York. 


Attention, Salesmen. 

Wanted, experienced jewelry salesmen to thor- 
oughly canvass one or two of the following States: 
Michigan, Wisconsin, Missouri, Kansas, Nebraska, 
with Side Line of Alarm Clocks to be sold in lots 
of 100, assorted if desired. Retailers never bought 
clocks as low as you can offer them. Address, 
“Alarm,” care Jewelers’ Circular-Weekly, room 
414, 134 Van Buren St., Chicago, 111. 


Loans on Diamonds 

in any amount at legal interest 
and no commission. 

Address, “INTEREST,” 

Care JEWELERS’ Circular-Weekly. 


Columbus, 0. 

Charles II. Backen.stoe, jeweler, Fostoria. 
was married last Sunday to Miss Marie 
Wurtemberger, of Toledo. 

H. \V. Ilildebrant, assignee of J. R. 
McConil), Shelby, has sold the stock of 
jewelry to O. G. Carter and J. AI. Chand- 
ler, of Cleveland. They will close it out at 
cut rates, it is said, as soon as possible. 

Administrator W. S. Bell, of the George 
H. Bonnet estate, at Zanesville, is selling out 
the jewelry stock at private sale. He has 
placed very low figures on it in order to 
obviate the necessity of selling at auction, 
but expects to dispose of what is not sold 
in this way at auction later on. This will 
close up a jewelry business which has been 
in the Bonnet family almost ever since 
Zanesville has been a town. 

George Haughraii was received at the 
penitentiary a few days ago to serve six 
years for attempting to hold up jeweler 
William Dorer, Bellaire. He walked into 
Mr. Borer’s store and commanded him to 
throw up his hands, but a son of the pro- 
prietor happened to be in the room and 
the men gave the robber a fight. He shot 
several times at the elder Dorer, but did 
not hurt him. He was at once arrested 
and sent to the penitentiary from which he 
was released only a few months before. 

The case of Charles H. Blume, Marietta, 
against Haynes Bros., Newark, has been 
settled and dismissed. Some time ago a 
man went into the store of Haynes Bros, 
and manipulated the ring case, taking a 
diamond valued at $135 and leaving one in 
its place that was worth about $85. It 
seems that Mr. Blume had lost a ring in 
the same way and he went to Newark an I 
identified the ring in Haynes Bros.’ 
store as the one taken. The matter was 
settled satisfactorily to both parties an I 
Haynes Bros, retain the ring. 

Harrington & Nonnemacher have ar- 
ranged to move from their jmesent location 
on April 1 to 83 N.High St., where the new 
room will be completely remodeled for 
them. A new front in light wood or metal 
and plate glass will be put in and the floor 
will be laid with a handsome pattern of 
tile. For some years the firm have occu- 
pied a room in connection with a music 
house, but here they will be alone. 


Tj'OR SALE — Jewelry business in town of 5,000; 
-*• stock and fixtures about $1,200; bench work 
alone about .$1,500 a year. “XX F.,” care Jewelers’ 
Circular-Weekly. 


I^ERITORIOUS INVENTION of great popu- 
lar demand; universal necessity, interesting 
specially jewelers, opticians; will monopolize 
market; seeks capital. H. L., 480 Fulton St., 
Brooklyn, N. Y. 


"pARTNER WANTED — Salesman with $10,000 or 
$12,000, in well established manufacturing 
jewelry business, located in Newark, N. J.; busi- 
ness will stand strict investigation: unquestionable 
references required. Address, G. F. D., care Jew- 
elers’ Circular-Weekly. 


LOFT TO LET 

with or without power. 

Very desirable for Jewelers or Silversmiths. 

DEITSCH BROS., 

14 E. 17th St., New York. 


I ONE IIIJNDRED THOUSAND AMERICAN WATCHES 
have ABBOTT’S PATENT STEM-WINDING ATTACH- 
I MENTS. A few million key-winding watches are 
still in use. A few jewelers may make a few 
dollars by sending a few of these watches for al- 
teration to HENRY ABBOTT, 9-11-13 Maiden 
Lane, New York. 

Watchmaking-, Optical and 
Engraving. 

Winona, Minn. W. F. A. Woodcock 



'p'OR SALE — In one of the best business towns 
*■ _ in Virginia, an up-to-date jewelry business, 
payjng profit of $3,000 a year; will sell for cash 
at 75 cents on the dollar; this is an opportunity 
met with but once in a lifetime; a good business 
must be sacrificed on account of poor health. Ad- 
dress, H. care Jewelers’ Circular-Weekly. 


p'OR SALE — Up-to-date jewelry and optical 
business; county seat; stock and fixtures, 
$3,000 to $4,000; can be reduced; established 15 
years; only jewelry and optical store in county; 
your own price for repairs and goods; fine busi- 
ness; southern Kentucky; good reasons for sell- 
ing. Address, “Elk,” care Jewelers’ Circular- 
W eekly. 


T© LET. 

TWO STORES and BASEMENTS, TOGETHER or SEPARATELY, 

Anderson Building, 12-16 John St.. 

Suitable for Je'w'elry, Clocks or Silverware. 
Electric Light and Steam Heat. 

Apply to WM. A. WHITE & SONS, 

Telephone, 2482 Cortiandt. 115 Broadway, New York. 


40 


THE JEWELERS’ CIRCULAR-WEEKLY. 


February 13, 1901. 


Most Compact 

AND THINNEST 
DUST-PROOF 

Open-Face Gold Case 

MADE IN THE WORLD 
FOR 

AMERICAN MOVEMENTS. 

Made in all shapes, engine turned, 
engraved or plain. 



Colby Patent, April 24, 1894. 

j Dubois Watch Case Go., 

21-23 Maiden Lane, N. Y. 


PIRIE MAC DONALD 

gives you 

G 1 K.EETING . He has a workshop 
on the 16 th floor of the Wash= 
ington Life “Building, New York, 
where he makes photographs and 
various other kinds of portraits 
of men. Not but that he loves 
women, as all good men should, 
but because he knows he 
can make men’s pictures best. 

“ Blessed is that man who has 
found his work.” 


News Gleanings. 


E. C. Eager, agent, Syracuse. X. Y., 
is selling at auction. 

Will DeSmidt has opened a jewelry 
store at Cedar Grove, W'is. 

William E. Hall has removed to a new 
location at Johnstown, N. Y. 

F. J. Stilson. Atlanta. Ga., has filed a 
voluntary petition in bankruptcy. 

Charles L. Paasch has discontinued his 
jewelry business at Newburgh, N^. Y. 

M. Mannernd, Lake Renton, Minn., will 
move hia business to Hendricks, IMinn. 

On March 1 E. J. Gilbert, Fonda, 
X. Y., will remove to Fultonville, :N. Y. 

IM. Weinstein has moved his jewelry 
store in Webster, S. Dak., into new quar- 
ters. 

F. L. Hiinke, .Albany, X. Y., is attend- 
ing to business again after a severe ill- 
ness. 

Christensen & Erikson have opened up 
a new stock of jewelry in Salt Lake City, 
Utah. 

M. H. Rice, Montpelier. Vt., has failed, 
and is offering creditors 2o cents on the 
dollar. 

Wh W. Mitchell has decided to sell out 
his entire jewelry business located in 
Kaufman, Tex. 

J. J. Binder is about to discontinue the 
jewelry business he has been conducting 
in Ashland, Wis. 

W'illiam Kemp, Sr., is closing out the 
stock of jewelry which he has been operat- 
ing in Flatonia, Tex. 

R. C. Bernau, who has been in bus n:ss 
at Abbeville, S. C., is nreparing to locate 
in Greensboro, N. C. 

S. Roaeman, of Roseman Bros., San 
Antonio, Tex., has been sued for $108, the 
value of some rings. 

R. J. Gabriel has advertised the stock of 
jeweliy for sale which he has been operat- 
ing in Carthage, Mo. 

Irving Oppel, of G. A. Oppel & Son. 
Little Falls, X. Y., has been confined to 
his home by illness. 

For the past three weeks John Krank, 
Schenectady, N. Y.. has been holding an 
auction sale of his stock. 

Edmund Spencer is now the honored 
orator of Hudson Council, of the Royal 
-Arcanum, at Hudson, X. A*. 

E. C. Bennett, jeweler, Zumbrota, Minn., 
was married at Red Wing, Minn., last 
week to Miss Beatrice Gahler. 

K. B. Hefte has moved his jewelry store 
in Carthage, S. Dak., into new quarters 
with T. W. Howey’s drug store. 

S. W. Risicn has removed the stock of 


jewelry which has been located in Me.xia, 
Tex., to a new location in Corsicana, Tex. 

.A transcript of judgment for .$829 has 
been filed against George W. Ryan. Jr., 
of George M'. Ry-an & Co., Omaha, Xeb. 

J. Lanning. jeweler, Wesley, la., died 
recently of typhoid fever, of which he had 
been sick all Winter. He leaves a widow. 

The E. R. iMoses Mercantile Co., Great 
Bend. Kan., have sold out the branch store 
they have been conducting in Clafiin,' Kan. 

E. Hayes, who is engaged in the jewelry 
and musical instrument business in Xor- 
folk, Xeb., has given a chattel mortgage 
for $250. 

H. Roberts, East Grand Forks, Minn., 
who was ■ recently burned out, has ac- 
cepted a position at Dickinson, X. Dak., 
at the bench. 

-Anderson & Houghton have practically 
suspended business at their store at Little 
Fall^, N. A'., while the same is undergoing 
a complete transformation. 

The interest of the late F. H. Auerbach 
in the jewelry and dry goods business of 
F. Auerbach & Bro., Salt Lake City, 
Utah, has been disposed of. 

Otto L. Heintz and Edwin A. Heintz 
have been admitted into the firm of Heintz 
Bros., Buffalo, X. A'., and the firm are. 
continuing under the same style. 

P. Nelson & Co., Duluth, Minn., who 
have a department store in that city, will 
open up another store in West Duluth, 
where they will carry a large stock of 
jewelry. 

B. W. IMoore, jeweler, Stewartville. 
IMinn., has accepted the representation of 
the People’s Telephone Co. there. He is 
succeeded as jeweler by Clarence Moore, 
of Winona, Minn. 

In some sections the jewelry trade seems 
to get the political fever. -At Canajoharie. 
X. Y.. F. L. Burton is running for Town 
Clerk: Charles -A. Hagadorn, for Police 
Justice, while William J. Roser, an ex- 
jeweler, is a candidate for Supervisor. 

John Rosendahl has closed his jewelry 
business at Echo, Minn., and has moved 
to Winthrop, Minn., where he will open a 
stock. He will also serve as watch in- 
spector for the Minneapolis and St. Loui.> 
Railway for the division ending at Morton. 

The application to confirm the composi- 
tion of 30 per cent, cash offered by the 
bankrupt jewelry firm of Taylor Bros.. 
Houston, Tex., a few days ago. was heard 
by the referee, Feb. (!. Over two-thirds of 
the creditors accepted the proposition and 
none of them filed any objection. Judge 
Burnett, the referee, recommended the 
confirmation of the composition and for- 
warded the papers to Judge Bryant for his 
action. 


The Bowden Rings 

ARE COMPLETE IN VARIETY, CORRECT IN 
QUALITY AND PERFECT IN HNISH. WE 
MAKE EVERY VARIETY OF FINGER RINGS. 

J. B. BOWDEN & CO., 

I Maiden Lane, NEW YORK. 


February 13, 1901. 


THE JEWELERS’ CIRCULAR-WEEKLY. 


41 


U. G. Miller, of Columbus Junction, la., 
will go into the jewelry business in West 
Liberty, la. 

Jule K. Pickett, Salem, O., will move to 
111 E. Main St. The store will be 
greatly improved. 

Mrs. George Petchtle will continue the 
iewelry business of her late husband in 
Middleburg, N. Y. 

L. S. Clark, a jeweler and optician, of 
18 years’ experience, has started a jewelry 
store in Glenville, O. 

Ash Pierce, of Anaconda, Mon., was 
in Everett, Wash., last week, looking for 
a business location for a jewelry store. 

Andrew Anderson, -of Park River, N. D., 
will open a jewelry store in the O. H. Nel- 
son building. Thief River Falls, Minn. 

M. Korman has closed out his store in 
St. Michael’s, Md., at auction, and with 
his family removed to Washington, D. C. 

A small blaze occurred in the rooms over 
L. Fischel's jewelry store. New Orleans, 
La., a few days ago. Little damage was 
done. 

It is reported that Carl Milligan, a jew- 
eler from Keosauqua, la., has rented a 
store in New London, la., and will go 
into business there soon. 

J. E. Cochran and W. N. Burke have 
purchased the jewelry business of D. E. 
Kennedy, Tifton, Ga., and opened busi- 
ness, Feb. 1. 

In a fire in Dover, N. J., a few days ago, 
the jewelry stock of Edward Scott was 
greatly damaged by water. Loss covered 
by insurance. 

Mrs. Fidelia Ewell Foucher, wife of 
Charles H. Foucher, jeweler, Wyoming, 
N. Y., died last Saturday afternoon, aged 
70 years and 6 months. 

A. M. Aoibler, Middletown, N. Y., has 
been appointed watch inspector and ex- 
aminer for the Ontario and Western Rail- 
road in place of B. F. Gordon, who retired 
Feb. 1. 

Hugh L. Coffman, who has been em- 
ployed in the J. C. Herkner Jewelry Co.’s 
store. Grand Rapids, Mich., accompanied 
by his mother and sister, has gone to Col- 
orado Springs to reside permanently. 

John H. Alerz., Sr., aged 82, died at the 
residence of his son John, at Hopewell, 
N. J., some days ago, froni paralysis. De- 
ceased was well known in Somerville, N. 
J., and for many years conducted a jewelry 
store there. 

Austin M. Edwards, jeweler and silver- 
smith, Lancaster, N. Y., has petitioned 
in bankruptcy. He acknowledges that there 
are unsecured debts against him amount- 
ing to .$19,891.68, and that he has assets to 
the amount of $50, which he claims to be 
exempt. 

B. Siegel, loan broker, Des Moines, la., 
has decided to open a wholesale jewelry 
house in that city. At present Mr. Siegel 
is in the east, procuring a stock. It is un- 
derstood that the house will be opened up 
in one of the store rooms on Court Ave., 
in the wholesale district. 

John Mitchell, with his wife and two chil- 
dren, arrived in Nassau, N. Y., about a 
month ago, claiming to be a manufactur- 
ing jeweler. He hired a residence and a 
store, and while they were undergoing 
repairs the whole family left for parts un- 
known, leaving several unpaid bills. 


OPALS. 


We have received from Australia a large consignment of rough 
Opals, which we are cutting. We will, on receipt of $ 10 . 00 , 
send an assorted package of 10 carats to any jeweler 
and return money it goods are not worth double thai price. 


MENDES CUTTING FACTORIES, 

12-16 JOHN STREET, NEW YORK. 










HEINTZ BROS., 


Ring 

Makers, 

BUFFALO, 
N. Y. 



Ring 

Makers, 

BUFFALO, 
N. Y. 


We make the largest line of Solid Gold Set Rings in America for the Retail Trade. 


New ARTISTIC Trade CATALOGUE 

IN BEAUTIFUL COLORS. 

The New England Watch Co., 

JULES H. LACI^O IX, Selling Agent, 

37 & 39 Maiden Lane, NEW YORK. 


SEND FOR ONE. 




SELLING NOW MORE THAN EVER. 

SILVERWARE CHESTS 


Send for Prices on Different Combinations. 


S. VALFER & CO., 

Manufacturers of 

Jewelry and Silverware Boxes, 
Trays, etc., and Paper Boxes, 

33 MAIDEN LANE, NEW YORK. 


SEND FOR CATAEOGFE. 



41’ 


THE JEWELERS’ CIRCULAR-WEEKLY 


February 13, 1901. 


CHART 

FOR THE 

Grading of Diamonds 


A. Blue white and perfect. 

B. Blue white and imperfect. 

C. Extra white and perfect. 

D. Extra white and slightly Imper- 

fect. 

E. Extra white and imperfect. 

1. White and perfect. 

2. White and slightly imperfect. 

3. White and imperfect. 

4. Very good color and perfect. 

5. Very good color and slightly im- 

perfect. 

6 Very good color and imperfect 
7. Good color and perfect. 

B. Good color and slightly imper- 
fect. 

9. Good color and imperfect 
Copyrighted Sept., 1900, by S. C. Scott. 


GRADED DIAMONDS. 

There are several differ- 
ent and distinct grades of 
diamonds of the finer qual- 
ities. These are known 
in the “Rough” to cut- 
ters as Jaegers, Top Crys- 
tals, Crystals, Top Sil- 
vercapes and Silvercapes, 

Each of these grades we 
indicate by letters or num- 
bers. Each diamond we 
sell, whether loose or 
mounted, is marked with 
a number or letter to in- 
dicate the quality, and, 
remember, we guarantee 
them to be exactly as 
represented. 

We believe even those 
who are well posted in 
the different grades 
would find our system of 
much assistance in mak- 
ing sales. Our prices will 
compare favorably with 
any in the market. 

We cater for special 
memorandum sales. 

Just try us once and let 
us show you what we can 
do in quality and price. 

S. C. SCOTT MFG. CO., 

9, II, 13 Maiden Lane, 
NEW YORK. 



Traveling representatives 
may consider these coinmns 
open for the publication of 
any news or items of inter- 
est regarding themselves or 
their confreres. 

John F. Branigan 
has severed his con- 
nection as traveling 
salesman with Torrey 
Jewelry Co., Attle- 
boro, Mass., and is 
now connected with 
J. M. Fraser & Co., 


Providence, K. I. 

Harry Birch was in Charlotte. N. C., on the 7th. 

Maurice Rosenbaum, of Rosenbaum & Adler. 
New York, left for the west Friday. 

William Cooper, of Cooper & Forman, New 
York, is sick with grip at Anderson, N. C. 

Seymour \\\ Frolichstein and Fred H. England, 
of Frolichstein & Fhigland, New’ York, left for 
their territories Saturday and yesterday respec- 
tively. 


Mr. Platt, Theodore \\’. Foster lS: Bro. Co.; I. 
Price, Byron L. Strasburger •& Co.; Mr. Kennedy, 
Joseph Fahys & Co., called on Indianapolis, Ind., 
trade last week. 


Among the representatives ofthew'holesalejew'elry 
houses in Trenton, N. J.. recently were: Mr. 
Stanborough. Carter, Hastings & Howe; Robert 
(latter; William Link; E. Brennan, for L. Wit- 
senhausen. 

A meeting of the committee on reorganization 
of the New England Jewelry Traveling Men’s As- 
sociation will be held about March 1. The exact 
date and place of meeting will be announced later. 
This committee were ap])ointed at the annual 
meeting held in January. 

The following were in Minneapolis and St. Paul, 
Minn., the past week: I. Wile. Fllectric City Box 
Co.; Lewis L. Squire, F. II. Cutler & Co.; Ru- 
dolph Cony, L. Heller & Son; Mr. Peck. O. W. 
Bullock & Co.; W. A. Moore, F. W. Gessw'ein 
Co.; and representative of E. (1. Webster & Son. 

Among the eastern traveling men in St. Louis, 
Mo., last week were: Charles Higbee. H. F. 
Barrows & Co.; ^like Lambert, Henry Zimmern 
& Co.; Charles DeWolf, Landers, Frary & Clark: 
Mr. Klipper, Hipp. Didisheim Bro.; Mr. Krug- 
ler, H. A. Kirby Co.; Harry B. Kennion, Parks 
Bros. & Rogers; Henry Froehlich, H. Froehlich 
& Co. 


The following traveling salesmen recently visited 
the trade in Columbus, O.: C. P. Koch, The 

Meyrow'itz Mfg. Co.; A. K. Lavigne, Mathey 
Bros., Alathez <ik Co.; T. K. Bowne, E. Ira 
Richards «S: Co.; Fmianuel Jacobson, Jacobson 
Bros.; Fred. h. Baker, The Non-Retailing Co.; 
Julian Bechet, Shafer & Douglas; T. C. Keys, 

L. K. Waterman Co.; Fred. Casper, The Mauser 
Mfg. Co. 

Traveling salesmen who called on Davenport, 
la., jewelers the past week were: David Beer, 

Bernheim, Cohen Beer; Henry Froehlich, Jr., 
Henry Froehlich *S: Co.; Frank N. Wilcox, Inter- 
national Silver Co.; Louis Freund, Henry Freund 
& Bro.; D. Wile, Buffalo Jewelry Case Co.; M. 
Stein, Louis W'olfsheim i& Co.; A. N. Brittan, 

M. A. Mead tit Co.; Max Noel, Stein & FBlbogen 
Co.; L. Newhouse, I>. Newhouse & Co. 

Travelers liave been more numerous in Toronto, 
(Jnt., latterly than at any time since the holidays, 
among the more recent arrivals being: E. A. 

Woodmancey, Potter Buffinton, Providence; 
Mr. Goldburg, lleintz & Goldburg, Chicago; 
George E. Smith, Theodore W. Foster & Bro. Co., 
Providence; Fred. C. .Steimann, I'. C. Steimann Sc 
Co., New York; F. 11. Wilkinson, for A. W’itt- 
nauer, New York. The trade are buying freely in 
anticipation of a good Spring season. 

.Among the traveling salesmen who recently 
visited the trade in Detroit, Mich., were the fol- 
lowing: II. D. Cretchen, Hayden W. Wheeler & Co. ; 
F. E. Jackson, for William Davidson; M. II. King, 


M. IL King & Co.; William Ilanauer, Julius 
Becker & Co,; F. D. Newberger, K. Blackinton 
Sc Co,; W. J. Carrow, Mandeville, Carrow Sc 
Crane; A. D. Engelsman, (joodfriend Bros.; E. C. 
Stone. Battin & Co.; F. C. Staudinger, Sansbury 
vS: Nellis; T.ewis P. Cook, S. Sternau & Co.; M. E. 
\an Bergh, Van Bergh Silver Plate Co.; Lewis 
L. Squire, F. H. Cutler & Co.; W. S. Dudley, 
Kogers, Smith & Co. 

The traveling men who visited Kansas City, Mo., 
merchants last week were: George J. Gruen, D. 
Gruen cS: Sons; S. C. Howard, Dominick Sc Haff; 
G. .\. Webster; Arthur F2. Hall, Holmes & Ed- 
wards Silver Co.; (leorge E. Butterworth; F. L. 
I’ettee, Waterbury Clock Co.; R. Arnstein, Am- 
stein Bros. & Co.; A. Kiersky, A. L. Reed & Co.; 
R. H. Schley, Sloan Co.; Louis Freund, Henry 
Freund & Bro.; (T. H. Hull, The Pampoint Cor- 
poration; C. A. (iarlick, Schrader, W’ittstein Co.; 
J. W. Payne, Meriden Cutlery Co.; Mr. Bliss, 
Krementz & Co. 

Travelers in Pittsburgh, Pa., last week were: 
Lewis L. Squire, F. H. Cutler & Co.; Edwin L. 
Mpmford, Waite, Thresher & Co.; J. Oppen- 
heimer, for Julius VN'odiska; N. Lubo, Oscar Gott- 
lieb & Co.; Frank W. Trewin, Keystone Watch 
Case Co.; S. E. Coggins, Towle 'Mfg. Co.; S. W. 
Abbey, E. Ira Richards Co.; J. Williams, for 
('i. Armeny; C. H. Higbee, H. F. Barrows Sc Co.; 
II. D. Sherrill, Sinnock & Sherrill; Sol. Sichel, 
Eichberg & Co.; W. C. Barry, Larter, Elcox & 
Co.; \\'. II. Hurlbert, Providence Optical Co.; 
A. 1). Engelsman, (ioodfriend Bros. 

The traveling salesmen visiting the Boston 
trade last week included: John Abel, Abel, Luthy 
& Co.; Sig. Stern. Stern Bros. & Co.; Mr. Tarl- 
ton, Wightman & Hough Co.; Otto Wormser, 
Joseph Krankel’s Sons; Mr. Pelletreau, David 
Kaiser Co.; Harry F. Barrows, H. F. Barrows 
tS: Co.; T. G. Frothingham, T. G. Frothingham & 
Co.; E. I. Franklin. E. I. Franklin & Co.; R. G. 
Sweet, R. F. Simmons Co.; E. R. Snow, Keystone 
Watch Case Co.; George Becker, George liecker 
Sc Co.; Charles W. Jenks, Charles W. Jenks & 
Bro.; W. I). Fenimore, California Optical Co.; 
Joseph Dupaul, Dupaul-Young Optical Co.; C. D. 
'W'augh, E. Kirstein Sons Co.; Charles Keller, 
Charles Keller & Co.; Air. Cahoone, Providence 
Optical Co. 

A. Eastwick Wood, traveler for the Wilcox Sil- 
ver Plate Co., of the International Silver Co., 
sends to The Circular-Weekly an account of a 
thrilling exi)erience he had on a recent trip south. 
He had found business good and everyone was 
looking for a prosperous Spring trade; cotton had 
touched 10 cents and an even higher figure was 
looked for; in fact, the outlook was very bright. 
Mr. W'ood started from the hotel in Columbia, 

N. C., in a carriage to the depot to take a train 
for Greenville, S. C., when just as he was within 
a block of the station the horse took fright at a 
steam roller and started to run away. This in it- 
self was not of much consequence, as the driver 
could have pulled to a stop, but he kept pulling 
and tugging at the lines until finally the bit 
broke, which threw the bridle over the horse’s 
head. This seemed to scare the horse more than 
anything else, and then he started at a speed that 
would have done credit to Salvator. The vehicle 
was the ordinary light phaeton style with two 
seats; the driver, with Mr. Wood’s trunks, was on 
the front seat, while Air. Wood was in the back. 
The traveler sat for a moment perfectly cool and 
collected, taking in the situation, and he con- 
cluded that he would rather take his chances 
of jumping out to being smashed against a tele- 
phone pole. So he stepped out on the step 
and jumped. He landed on his feet and im- 
mediately “slid for second,” scraping his knee- 
cap and bruising himself pretty badly. But the 
wagon was smashed to kindling wood, the horse 
was hurt, the driver had his arm broken and was 
cut about the head. After being taken to a drug 
store and having his knee washed and bound up, 
Air. Wood was enabled to continue his journey to 
Greenville, where he arrived five hours later so 
stiff and sore that he had to be helped from the 
train. As soon as he got to the hotel he sent for 
D..C. Durham, of The Gilreath-Durham Co., who 
came over immediately and procured a good physi- 
cian, who made a critical examination and pro- 
nounced the case not serious, but advised com- 
plete rest, which Air. Wood did not take, and he 
was laid up twice. Then he concluded to go home 
and remain there until perfectly well. He arrived 
at his home last Sunday afternoon on crutches and 
will remain quiet until about the 15th , of this 
month, when he will go direct to Augusta, Ga., 
and finish his trip. 


February 13, 1901. 


THE JEWELERS’ CIRCULARr-WLEKLY. 


43 


Pittsburgh. 

O’Gusky & Meyers are holding an auc- 
tion sale at their Carnegie store. 

M. E. Shutterly, lately with A. E. 
Siviter & Co., has gone with Jo’^eph De 
Roy. 

A. C. Fry, Frankstown Ave., East End, 
is holding an auction sale to quit the 
business. 

The death of Whitehead Siviter, young 
son of Mr. and Mrs. A, E. Siviter, oc- 
curred on Sunday la:,t. 

Mr. Brillhart, Sr., who is in charge of 
the late Max P. Wilson’s store, Indiana, 
Pa., will start a store in that town. 

H. Carlson has left the Keystone Jew- 
elry Co. to go with Carlson Bros., Bloom- 
field, Pa. M. Henry takes his place. 

A. E. Siedle, the East End jeweler, ex- 
pects to make a number of improvements 
before moving to his new quarters on 
Penn Ave. 

Graf & Niemann, 6011 Penn Ave., are 
disposing of the present stock, “25 per 
cent, off,” preparatory to their removal 
to 6th St. 

Liljedahl & Lundborg will remove from 
Main and 8th Sts., Braddock, Pa., to Main 
and 6th Sts., where they will have better 
facilities for their increasing business. 

The matrimonial engagement of Harry 
Heeren, son of Otto Heeren, of Heeren 
Bros. & Co., to Miss Ethelyn B. Lowry, 
Du Bois, Pa., is formally announced. 

James McConahy, who for 25 years was 
a jeweler at New Castle, Pa., died last 
week in the Warren, Pa., hospital. He 
was a Civil War veteran and leaves a 
wife and two daughters. 

Cohen & Rosenthal are offering credi- 
tors 25 cents on the dollar. They state 
that if the offer is not accepted they will 
go into bankruptcy. They further state 
their liabilities are about $12,000 with as- 
sets of not more than $3,000. In Novem- 
ber last the firm claimed assets of $25,000 
and liabilities of $9,000. 

Buyers in the city last week were: H. 

H. Weylman and Mrs. Weylman, Kittan- 
ning, Pa.; M. J. Scudder and Mrs. Scud- 
der, St. Mary’s, W. Va.; H. R. Brown, 
New Brighton, Pa.; John Z. Simpson, 
Blairsville, Pa.; W. F. Brehm, Rochester, 
Pa.; G. V. Brady, Washington, Pa.; Leroy 
Swan, New Caatle, Pa.; A. French Poole, 
Washington, Pa.; S. C. Schuster, Latrobe, 
Pa.; John Linnenbrink. Rochester, Pa.; 
Charles Loughman, McKee’s Rocks, Pa. 

A stranger entered the store of Caplan 
& Teplitz, Monessen, Pa., one day last 
week and asked to see some diamond 
rings. While Mr. Caplan’s attention was 
apparently momentarily distracted, the 
stranger dropped a $100 diamond ring into 
his coat pocket and started toward the 
door. Quick as a flash, however. Jeweler 
Caplan drew a revolver, leveled it at the 
astonished stranger, and demanded his 
ring. The request was immediately ac- 
ceded to, the man disappeared and Jeweler 
Caplan is the hero of the hour in Mones- 
sen, McKeesport and Braddock circles. 

M. N. Grasby, jeweler. La Crosse, Wis., 
left town about a fortnight ago, leaving 
his clerk in charge. Feb. 4 his stock was 
seized on a writ of attachment issued at 
the instance of A. Hirsch & Co. and M. 
S. Fleishman Co., of Chicago. 









Zhc jfrancts JEngraver 

is the only machine having a turning point. If you are a mechanic you know what 
that means. If you are not, and do not really understand why it is said to be better, 
post up before buying or you will always regret it. This journal will have fifty-two 
little advertisements in it this fiscal year, commencing with the full-page advertise- 
ment that appeared last week. You may be prejudiced against all engraving 
machines, as many are who do not understand them, and judge by what they have 
seen in the past, but don’t let these little squibs escape your notice. They will all 
be different, and before you know it you will understand more about engraving 
machines than you ever expected to, and think more and more of them. When you 
have time, write me to send you catalogue, etc. If you ever happen to find yourself 
confronted with the problem of how to do your engraving best and cheapest, if you 
don’t think the time and postage well invested. I'll pay you for the trouble. 

Address, A. E. FRANCIS, 

No. 780 Cedar Ave., Cleveland, Ohio. 

• 



\ « >L. XLII. NEW YORK, WEDNESDAY, FEBRUARY 13, 1901. No. 2. 


Chicago Notes. 


Cincinnati. 


All communications in reference to the Chi- 
cago department of The Jeivelers' Circular- 
Weekly, addressed to Stephen Parlin, 134 
Van Buren St., Room 414, Chicago, will 
receive prompt attention. 


.\t o’clock on the nig:ht of Feb. 4, 

a fire occurred at 140 State St., near Mad- 
ison. the blaze originating in the cellar 
by the crossing of electric light wires and 
doing $.j.5(i0 damage, $500 of which was 
represented in smashed plate glass. The 
Barrios Diamond Co., J. and S. T. 
Harris, local agents, suffered the princi- 
pal loss. They occupied the ground floor. 

Mrs. John J. Watson, who, as Miss 
.\my Sesselberg, was arrested in the store 
of C. D. Peacock, a few weeks ago,- on a 
charge of stealing a diamond ring, has 
brought suit against the firm for $50,000 
damages. The young woman’s fiance, Mr. 
Watson, came to her aid at the time of 
her arrest and has since married her. Miss 
Sesselberg was discharged upon the pre- 
liminary hearing of the accusation against 
her. She lived in Kaukauna, W’is., and 
was visiting in this city at the time of her 
arr«st. 

Chemicals e.xploding in the laboratory 
.f the Economical Drug Co., 84 State St., 
are b-dieved to have been the cause of a 
fir* theri- at 11 o’clock on the night of 
I' -b. 5, and which did about $5,000 dam- 
age in that and the building at 80 State 
St. The flamt-.s worked up through the 
wall to the south into Seaver’s restaurant, 
but tl-‘ damage there was almost entirely 
from ,m'*ke. F. C. llappel & Co., whole- 
sale jewelers, on the third floor at 84 State 
St., a! o -uff'-red damage by smoke. Their 
b, ■- placed at ^flOO. 

Htnr’. Landsman, wIkj was arrested 
i;:st M'»nday, eharge'l with robbery, ac- 
':Uaipti-d the p*dice with a new incentive 
tv- r'-bbery. lie want-, to learn a trade, 
and ■',r ihat reason he stole, in hopes 
of b in;-' :-nt to the penitentiary. “I 
want to go there to learn some trade 
because I cannot live at my jmesent trade 
on a • tel;.” That was the way he ex- 
pbiin**! •“ Landsman was employed as a 
o wfc’cr by J. Rosenthal, •31-'58 Cottage 
■'*r<; \-;e. He is 25 years *jf age. A few 

'! ;y . ag i he disappeared and so did an $85 
■harr '! r: o • ’■elonging to his employer. 

Henry was. arr* sited six pawn tickets 
WC--C found in his jjo- o siion. He said | 
fr;;y v- ; rc oT ring hc had Uolen from his 

"o-th- c wl -> is a jeweler also, and from 


Joseph Becker, agent for Joseph Fahys 
& Co., is in Dallas, Tex., calling on old 
customers. 

E. E. Mosiman, Bluffton, Ind., is ar- 
ranging his business to leave on the first 
of iMarch for a two months’ tour of Cali- 
fornia. 

Clooney, Maysville, Ky., was in town 
last week, buying goods. M. Basinger, 
of Basinger & Cameron, Lima, O., was 
in the city. 

Frank Rose, of the Ophir Diamond 
Co., this city, went to Milwaukee last 
week to marry Miss Evelyn Hartly. They 
will reside in this city. 

The death of L. Gutmann will not neces- 
sitate any change in the firm. 1 he sons 
will carry on the business under the same 
firm name of L. Gutmann & Sons. 

Jack Bittcrman, of Bitterman Bros., 
Evansville, Ind., will be married on Feb. 
14 to Miss Hattie Sholer, of that city. 
They will go east on a wedding trip. 

Irving Herman has returned from a trip 
and says business is very good through 
the country. He reports that Jenkins & 
Co., Richmond, Ind., have opened a 
branch store at Elwood, Ind. 

Morris Strauss, formerly with the old 
firm of Schroder & Herman, when they 
were on Race St., a number of years ago, 
has returned from North Dakota, where 
he has been for the past 10 years. 

IMayo Loeb, of Herman & Locb, son of 
L. Loeb, of this firm, has been laid up at 
his home for five weeks. This firm have 
been seriously handicapped the past three 
months by the illness of their force. 

P'rank Herschede and wife start this 
week for a seven weeks’ trip to California. 
They will visit all the large cities and re- 
sorts cn route and make a visit to relatives 
at Los Angeles. This is the first pleasure 
trip Mr. Herschede has taken in years, 
and he expects to thoroughly enjoy it and 
be benefited by it. 

'riic Wadsworth Watch Case Co. shut 
down Monday on account of the funeral 
of Miss Stegeman, which occurred that 
day. Miss Stegeman was the sister of 
■Mr. Wadsworth’s wife and also of Harry 
Stegeman, of the same company. She had 
gone south for her health and died at 
Asheville, N. C., last week. 

Gustave h'ox & Co. have got out a new 
model of their patented elk head for watch 
cases. The ornament will be made in 
gold and silver and will have rivets on the 
back to rivet it to the case. Some arc 
j made with a circle of enamel, in which the 


name or inscription may be put. The gold 
ones will be very elaborate and some of 
them will be quite expensive, but their 
beauty will commend them to the high 
class trade. 

Joseph Noterman & Co. made last week 
a solid gold medal for M. Pieper, the Cov- 
ington jeweler, which is to be presented 
to the Covington Chief of Police. The 
medal cost about $300, is four inches long, 
the medallion containing the State seal in 
colored gold. A wreath of laurel in sage 
colored gold surrounds the seal. The 
whole is suspended from a spread eagle. 
The seal is encircled with small diamonds 
and a 1-karat diamond is in the top. It is 
a magnificent piece of work. 


Minneapolis and St. Paul. 

W. F. Kuhn, manufacturing jeweler, St. ' 
Paul, has removed from 274 E. 7th St. to 
214 E. 7th St. 

The journeymen jewelers of Alinneapo- , 
lis contemplate forming a union under the 
trades and labor rules. , 

H. E. Schloss, of B. Schuette’s Min- 
neapolis store, has left for a northern r 
trip. He will be gone a fortnight. 

Rentz Bros., Minneapolis, are setting up 
their new hydraulic press. Fred. Damcke, 
engraver for this firm, has been ill with 
rheumatism for 10 weeks. 

A hearing as to the disposition of good.s 
and assets in the case of Abraham Cohen, ^ 
insolvent jeweler, St. Paul, occurred be- 
fore the referee last week. Cohen gave 
conflicting answers to questions and got 
thoroughly mixed up. He testified to los- ^ 
ing $5,000 on a bond deal in June, after 
which he was confronted with a statement 
which he made to an eastern clock 
company, Aug. 1, in which he stated that 
his liabilities, all told, amounted to some- 
thing over $1,000, and his net assets ex- 
ceeded $11,000. Following thij meeting his 
attorney presented a statement to the ef- 
fect that he. Cohen, suffered from a bad 
memory and from ignorance of the Eng- 
lish language: that since the hearing his 
memory had been refreshed by interviews 
with people with whom he had transactions 
outside the store, and that his statements 
were incomplete because of hij failure to 
understand ([uestions and because of his 
poor memory. Further, the statement de- 
clares that through “shame and abash- 
ment” he was unwilling at the previous 
hearing to state that he had lost $5,000 
at gaming. In view of these statements 
a further hearing was asked. It was set 
for Feb. 12. 


i 




February 13, 1901. THE JEWELERS’ CIRCULAR-WEEKLY. — Western Supplement. 


45 


Kansas City. 

The store of C. S. Raymond Sons is 
closed at present. 

E. A. Church, Oak Grove, Kan., has 
opened a store for himself at Buckner, Mo. 

W. H. Fitzsimmons, engraver for Cady 
& Olmstead, was called to Pottstown, Pa., 
by the sudden illness of his wife. 

C. B. Norton, president of the Norton- 
Paulson Jewelry Co., is expected to return 
from his trip with the Commercial Club 
this week. 

Ike Gleason, for many years with M. B. 
Wright and later with the Streicher 
Watch and Jewelry Co., has opened a jew- 
elry store for himself on 12th St. 

Cady & Olmstead have received an ad- 
vance card addressed to “Kadey & Olm- 
sted” from a firm they have traded with 
for years. They prefer to have their names 
.spelled in the usual manner. 

Arthur Clark, of the L. Bauman Jewelry 
Co., St. Louis, Mo., and formerlywith Nor- 
ton-Paulson Jewelry Co., this city, was called 
to Kansas City, Saturday, by his wife who 
is serioubly ill but is slightly improved at 
present. 

Sedalia Council, No. 47, United Com- 
mercial Travelers, passed resolutions last 
week indorsing Edward S. Villmoare for 
coal oil inspector of Kansas City. Mr. 
Villmoare travels for the Norton-Paulson 
Jewelry Co. 

E. M. Crellin, Chillicothe, Mo., has en- 
tered the. employ of Duck & Missman, as 
watchmaker. Duck & .Missman are a new 
firm who went into business just previous 
to the holidays, and they report business 
as keeping up very nicely. 

Bullard & Moore, manufacturers of 
photo-jewelry, buttons, medallions, etc., 
and dealers in all kinds of plated 
and solid rims and frames, have dis- 
solved partnership. The dissolution 
took effect Feb. 1, Harry G. Moore 
taking the Cincinnati plant, which he has 
been managing for over a year, and George 
A. Bullard taking the Kansas City house, 
which was started nearly four years ago 
and of which Mr. Bullard has had charge 
for the past 15 months. 

J. H. Baker, formerly in business at 
Horton, Kan., and who sold out his store 
on Grand Ave., last Fall, and assisted 
L. J. Marks with his recent auction, will 
go east early in March to purchase tools, 
machinery and a stock to open a new manu- 
facturing business here. Mr. Baker will 
be the manager and secretary of the firm 
who will be called the Kansas City Whole- 
sale Jewelry Mfg. Co. They will have a 
capital stock of $50,000 and expect to have 
the business running by the first of May. 
The firm have secured rooms in the New 
Nelson building, at Missouri Ave. and 
Main St. 

The merchants from the surrounding 
territory who visited .Kansas City, last 
week, were: C. C. Stevenson, Pittsfield, 

Kan.; M. C. Rosenfield, Leavenworth, 


Kan.; A. L. Howard, Louisburg, Kan.; 
T. C. Pitts, Aldrich, Mo.; S. J. Fluey, Ex- 
celsior Springs, Mo.; Leroy Van Lehn, 
Stafford, Kan.; F. W. Swearingen, Tope- 
ka, Kan.; McCoy M. Stott, Miraville, Mo.; 

D. M. Conn, Cameron, Mo.; E. A. Bur- 
lingame, Argentine, Kan.; C. E. McCoy, 
Polo, Mo.; August Schlieker, Vinita, I. T. ; 
J. A. Robb, Almira, Kan.; Frank Wuerth, 
son of J. H. Wuerth, of Leavenworth, 
Kan., and junior member of J. H. Weurth 
& Son; C. E. VanVoorhis, Yates Center, 
Kan.; J. O. VanVoorhis, Osawatomie, 
Kan., and J. E. Watkins, Tonganoxie, 
Kan. 


Indianapolis. 

Charles Smethurst, Converse, Ind., has 
sold out his jewelry business to Merle 
Agness. 

Since Feb. 10 Phil Diel, Marion, Ind., 
has occupied a fine room in the Glass 
block. Thib store is now one of the hand- 
somest jewelry stores in the State. 

Chris. Bernloehr has taken his brother, 
John, into partnership. The firm are now 
known as Bernloehr Bros.' Charles Bern- 
loehr will soon finish his course of study 
with the Illinois Watch Co., and become 
watchmaker for his brothei'b. 

Buyers in the city last week included: 

E. M. Wilson, Anderson, Ind.; J. A. 
Meissen, Cicero, Ind.; Jobcph Booth, of 
I. Booth & Son, Tipton, Ind.; 'George 
Drake, Pendleton, Ind.; E. A. Wiley, 
Mooresville, Ind.; J. W. Thompson, Dan- 
ville, Ind. 

Abraham B. Bowman, aged 23, died at 
his residence Feb. 3. Mr. Bowman was 
well known in the S. Meridian St. whole- 
sale district, having held a confidential 
position with Schnull & Co. for seven 
years. He left the employ of the firm last 
October and re-engaged in the jewelry 
business, the firm being known as the 
Bowman Jewelry Co. 

Fred. FI. Schmidt died Feb. 4, at his 
home, 16 Elm St., after an illness of 10 
months. For several years he was an ac- 
tive traveling man, and later a jeweler in 
Jackson Place. Four months ago he was 
operated upon, but death was inevitable 
and four weeks ago he was taken home 
to die. A widow and two children sur- 
vive him. Fie wab born in Nassau, Ger- 
many, 51 years ago, and had lived in this 
city since 1880. 

Springfield, 111. 

The factory of the Illinois Watch Co. 
commenced working 12 hours per day on 
Feb. 4, owing to the steadily increasing 
demand for their watches. 

James Keithly, a fireman employed by 
the Illinois Watch Co., while crossing the 
tracks of the Illinois Central, near the 
Union depot, was struck by the engine of 
a passenger train and seriously injured, 
being badly cut about the shoulders. H:s 
recovery is doubtful. 


Oriental Pearls. American Pearls. 


All kinds of Jobbing Stones. 
LAPIDARY WORK. 

HERMANN & CO., 

IMPORTERS OP 

Precious ^ Imitation Stones, 

CHICAGO. 

Baroque Pearls. Half Pearls. 


MASONIC 

TEMPLE, 




F. C. KLEIN. 


EMIL KLEIN. 


! F.G. KLEIN &BR0., 

I 126 State St., Chicago. 

I 

I Steam 

I Lapidary. 

i DIAMOND CUTTING. 

i 

• IMPORTERS OP 

e 

• Precious and Jobbing Stones. . 



America’s Leading Art and 
Jewelry Auctioneer, 

Dan I. Murray. 

Twenty years’ experi- 
ence in the Wholesale, 
Retail, Manufacturing 
and Importing Jewelry 
Business. 

I have never failed to move a stock. I 
work on commission. My methods are new 
and original. 

WRITE ME EOR TERMS, Etc. 

126 State St., Room 602, Chicago, III. 
No. 3 Maiden Lane, Room 61, New York. 

AT PRESENT SELEING FOR E. 1. CUENDET, 21 
JOHN ST., NEW YORK, large importer of Musical 
Boxes and French Bric-a-Brac. 

For the next two weeks, address my New York office. 

S. C. CITROEN & CO., 

Diamond Cutters and Polishers for the Trade. 

Special attention given to repairing stones. 
Cutting of Rough Diamonds at lit. 

415 to 419 Race St.. CINCINNATr. OHIO. 


SEYMOUR W. FROLICHSTEIN. FRED. H. ENGLAND. 

FROLICHSTEIN & ENGLAND, 


DIAMONDS, RINGS AND JEWELRY, PRESCOTT BUILDING, 65 NASSAU STREET, NEW YORK. 

NEW FIRM NEW GOODS NEW IDEAS. 


cK»ooooo(X}ooooooooo<xxxx}ooooooooooc>x:oo(X}CKXxxxxxxxx>ooocxx>ooocxx>ocKxxx>ooooooooocKX)ooooooooooooooooooo(xx)00o(xxxx>oo 


THE JEWELERS’ CIRCULAR-WEEKLY. — Western Supplement. February 13, 1901. 


4i: 


X500000000000000000000000C5I 

SIOOOAYEARI 
FOR Lift. ■ 

A rhorough investigation will con- 
vince you that Sl'J.oO per month in- 
vested fin six years in the Monte- 
?;unia Plantation will give you an 
inc>mie of for life. It will 

convince you that the enterprise is 

NOT A SPECULATION 

hu: .. solid, conservative inve.stment, 
in which tlie organizers, to make 
their profit, must make a success 
for the investors. The plantation 
consists of C.dUo acres and is being 
plantiid to sugar and rubber. 

The interest of one is the interest 
o! all and each shareholder has 
only one vote— impossible to freeze 
out. 

The Mexican Coffee and Rubber 
(Irowers* .issociation manages the 
plantation for Jo years. The mer- 
cantile agencies will tell you that it 
has .s.'i.ooii.iHiO capital and $4,000,000 
assets, including its own steamboats. 

SIX PER CENT. GUARANTEED 
FOR SIX YEARS. 

To investors who pay all cash the 
.Association guarantees six per cent, 
for six years and the Chicago Title 
and Trust Co. agrees to pay it, 
which makes it as mire as the in- 
terest on a (Government bond. The 
Trust Co., capital $1,300,000, also 
holds the title to the land and re- 
ceives every dollar paid by the in- 
v'.'tors. 

Not one of all the authorities on 
the planet places the profit on rub- 
ber and sugar at less than oO per 
cent.— most all at 100 to 200. 

Sir Thomas Lipton says: 

For sure, large and perma- 
nent returns nothing etpials 
a well managed tropical plan- 
tation.” 

Russell Sage says: 

“If I were a younger man I 
wouhl invest my money in a 
rubber plantation, as it is bet- 
ter than a bank. Spreck- 
ie- IS making millions from his 
sugar plantation in Hawaii.” 

A ou can invest a-, little as $2.30 
per month. The shares are non-for- 
f( itable after three years’ payment. 

If the investor dies the amount paid 
will be returned. The members an- 
nually elect an inspector to visit the 
land and excursions will be con- 
ducted. -Many Chicago business and 
j.rofe sional men have taken shares 
and indorsed this enterprise. We 
invite the most rigid investigation. 
Write for literature. 


MONTEZUMA PLANTATION, 

1107 Ashland Block, CHICAGO. 

x>ooooooooooo<xxxxxx>oooooo ( 


San Francisco. 

Leon Carrau. of Carrau & Green, goes 
ea.st this week. 

Taber Bros, will reopen their establish- 
ment here soon. 

Air. ami Mrs. F. C. Ewert, of Woodland. 
Cal., were in this city last week. 

Walter Kin.g, with Charles Haas & Son. 
Stockton. Cal. is en.ioyin.g a vacation here. 

H. E. Hall will go to Honolulu, Hawaii, 
this week. He will be away about si.x 
weeks. 

George Smith, representing the Key- 
stone W’atch Case Co., is doing some mis- 
sionary work on this coast. 

W. Kenna, representing the Elgin Na- 
tional Watch Co., is in from Los Angeles 
on his way to the Pacific Northwest. 

J. A. Young, who recently purchased the 
business of Haskell & Muegge. this city, 
will take to the road about the 15th inst. 

Y. H. Boudreau, Modesto, Cal., has sold 
his business there to W. L. Tregea. who 
has been with J. N. Brittain for several 
years. 

Percy Greer, auctioneer, who has just 
had a successful sale in Los .\ngeles. Cal., 
is now at Soledad, according to reports 
received in this city. 

G. Beninghausen. Seattle, Wash., was at 
the Grand Hotel, this city, last week. 

P. Hall, Visalia. Cal, was among our visi- 
tors from the interior. 

large number of travelers for eastern 
houses have visited this city and have met 
with unusual success. Our jobbers are 
rapidly getting their men out and antici- 
pate a lively demand. 

A. Hansen, Seattle, Wash., is greatly 
pleased that Seattle has secured the build- 
ing of a United States battleship. The 
contract price of $3,000,000 will materially 
assist the merchants there. 

George E. Paine, with E. 1. Franklin & 
Co., North Attleboro, and S. J. Hughes, 
with George H. Cahoone & Co., Provi- 
dence, were among the representatives of 
eastern manufacturers here last week. 

Pacific Coast Notes. 

E. P. Segret, watchmaker and jeweler, 
has opened an establishment at Carters, 
Cal. 

A. E. Howard, of Howard & Ingalsbe, 
Merced, Cal., has purchased Mr. Ingals- 
be’s interest in the jewelry establishment 
and will hereafter conduct it as sole pro- 
prietor. 

W. T. Harris, Jack Moore and Thomas 
Lackey, of San Bernardino, Cal., have re- 
turned to that city from a trip into the des- 


ert beyond Kramer, where they investi- 
gated some opal beds. They were gone 
almost a month and seem satisfied with the 
prospect. 

Omaha. 

E. Baldwin, Lexington, Neb., has sold 
out. 

George Perkins, Genoa, Neb., has sold 
out to 'A. B. Miller. 

W. H. Weir, Boone, la., was in the city 
last week purchasing goods. 

H. E. Snyder. Plattsmouth, Neb., was 
in the city last week buying goods. 

Homer Wicker, with A. L. Coleman, the 
South Omaha jeweler, has accepted a po- 
sition with L. P. Judd, Cedar Rapids, Neb. 

A. M. Molesworth, Shelby. la., reported 
as closing out, has removed to ^^larysville, 
Mo., where he will engage in the jewelry 
business. 

T. L. Combs & Co., “the Busy Jew- 
elers.” are making extensive improve- 
ments in their store building. A balcony 
is being built in which the work shop will 
be placed, and a neat private office is be- 
ing furnished on the ground floor. 

George W. Ryan has returned from a 
visit of several weeks’ duration in Alil- 
waukee. During his absence handsome 
improvements have been made in his store. 
The whole front was taken out and new 
plate glass with deep recess windows for 
showing goods erected. 

W. Hanson, of the horological school, 
has returned to his home in Kansas. 
Edward Morey, Valentine, Neb., has en- 
tered for a course in watchmaking. Percy 
Wilkins has established himself in business 
in New Hampton, la., and has engaged 
F. C. Calhoun as his assistant. 

Hiram E. Smith, who sold his jewelry 
business in Madison, Wis., to Mr. Gamm 
about two years ago and then spent a year 
in Norway restoring his health, has now 
bought out the business of A. E. Thor- 
eson, at 122 E. Main St., that city. ]Hr. 
Thoreson goes to California, where he 
has a brother interested in sawmills and 
coal mines. 

Thomas W. Humphrey, who had been 
in the jewelry business in Billings, Mon., 
several years, has sold his entire stock to 
J. Forester. Mr. Forester will remove his 
stock from the Belknap block to the lo- 
cation which Mr. Humphrey has held, con- 
solidating the two stocks. Mr. Hum- 
phrey has not yet decided what he will do, 
Init he will remain in Billings for the pres- 
ent. He is offering his creditors 33 cents 
on the dollar. 


PHOTO BUTTON JEWELRY, 



NOT A FAD. HAS COME TO STAY. 

Send for our 48-page illustrated catalogue of the la^ge^t assortment 
manufactured. We are headquarters for Photo Buttons, Advertising But- 
tons, Button Machines, Button Findings, and everything pertaining to 
^he business. 

Our aim is to furnish goods at lower prices than they can be produced 
from other sources. We guarantee our prices and will meet any competi- 
ion. We never allow anybody to undersell us. 

ST. LOUIS BUTTON CO., 

No. 620 N. Broadway, 

ST. LOUIS, MO. 


A 

t i 

i 

1 




( 


' 1 

I 




I 

I 

I 


d 


Mention The Jewelers Circular-Weekly. 


I 


February 13, 1901. THE JEWELERS’ CIRCULAR-WEEKLY. — -Western Supplement, 


47 


St. Louis. 

TRADE CONDITIONS. 

The jewelry business continues quiet, with little 
prospect of it being better until the Spring trade 
sets in. January was good towards the last and 
many jewelers who thought they would fail in 
doing the amount of business they did last Jan- 
uary pulled ahead. 


John C. Dueber, president of the Dueber- 
Hampden Co., Canton, O., was in St. 
Louis last week. 

Joe McKenna, manager of the material 
department of the Bauman-Massa Jewelry 
Co., has been quite ill for several davs 
with grip. 

There were but few near-by buyers in 
the city last week. Arfiong them were: 
Roy Goulding, of E. H. Goulding’s Sons, 
of Alton, 111., and C.- H. Bard, .Sedalia, Mo. 

The new show windows of the Merrick, 
Walsh & Phelps Jewelry Co. are now com- 
pleted and make a very handsome appear- 
ance. They are large and afford an op- 
portunity for a 'fine display of bric-a-brac, 
jewelry, etc. 

Miss A. Meyer, bookkeeper for several 
years for J. W. Cary & Co., Holland build- 
ing, left the services of that firm 
last week and will be married this week. 
She was very popular with her late em- 
ployers and the well wishes of that firm 
and her many friends will go with her. 

F. L. Jaccard, the Texas traveler for the 
Bauman-Massa Jewelry Co., came in Feb. 
9 to attend the funeral of his mother, Mrs. 
Sophie Jaccard, who died at De Soto, Mo., 
Feb. 8, at the age of 74 years. Mrs. Jac- 
card’s husband was a distant relative of the 
well known jewelers by that name who 
were once in business in this city. 

J. C. Adams, manager of the watch de- 
partment of the Mermod & Jaccard Jewelry 
Co., will go out on a trip this week over 
the lines of the Burlington and Wabash 
Railroads in the interest of the Mermod- 
Jaccard new timekeeper, the “Paragon,” 
which is specially adapted for railroad ser- 
vice. He will be gone two weeks. 

The Retail Jewelers’ Association of 
Missouri are making special preparations 


for their banquet, Thursday evening, Feb. 
14. Plates will be laid for 40 or 50 persons, 
but more can be taken care of if they at- 
tend. A number of prominent business 
men -have been booked for speeches and 
the subject of the World’s Fair will be 
touched upon. Among those who will 
probably address the members are: Con- 
gressman Richard Bartholdt, Judge John 
A. Talty, of the Circuit Court, and Hon. 
Robert H. Kern. Others are also ex- 
pected. 

Thieves broke the large plate glass win- 
dow of Joseph J. Hoepffner’s jewelry store^ 
1231 N. 13th St., about 8 o’clock on the 
evening of Feb. 8, and stole a tray of valu- 
able diamond rings. They succeeded in 
getting away with their plunder and no 
clue was left which would lead to their 
identity. Mr. Hoepffner, who was in his 
store when the burglary was committed, 
gave chase to the men, but they escaped 
into a nearby market after firing at their 
pursuer. 


Detroit. 

Nearly every jeweler in the city is tak- 
ing inventory or preparing to do so 
shortly. Wright, Kay & Co. will take 
stock after hours this year. 

A glittering array of prizes to be 
awarded winners in the Detroit bonspiel 
contest and the Michigan Whist Associa- 
tion tournament is on exhibition in the 
show windows of Wright, Kay & Co. 

H. A. Bromberg, jeweler. Battle Creek, 
last week made three sales of diamonds 
aggregating $1,100. He declares that more 
diamonds have been sold during the past 
year than during the previous five years. 
Investors are buying only the very best 
quality. 


The largest medal press in Philadelphia, 
Pa., and probably in this country, is in the 
factory of the Peter L. Krider Co. Heavy 
bronze medals, about five inches in diame- 
ter, can be struck off on this press, which 
has an arm 14 feet long. 


ILLINOIS WATCH CASE CO. 



Art Designs on 

COMMANDER 


25=Year 

Gold-Filled Cases 

surpass all previous 
efforts in watch case 
engraving. 


A Modern Jeweler’s Stock 
Is Not Complete With- 
out Them. 


ILLINOIS WATCH CASE CO. 

Factory and ITain Office, 

ELGIN, ILL. 


Chicago. No. 133 Wabash Ave. 

New York, No 9 Haiden Lane, Qlll Bldg. 
San Francisco, No. 66 Crocker Bldg. 



Georgian 


STERLING In Complete 

SILVER. Table Service — 

French Gray 
Finish. 



CHICAGO- 


NEWBURYPORT. HASS. 


We manufacture the Largest and ^Best 
line of 

HAIR ORNAMENTS 

in the country. 

CATALOGUE TO JOBBING TRADE ONLY. 

F. H. NOBLE & CO., 103 State St., Chicago. 




48 


THE JEWELERS’ CIRCULAR-WEEKLY. February 13, 1901. 


The Latest Patents. 


issue OF FES. S, 1901. 

cr.T.ITi! KSC.VrEMEN'T. M.\x B.^ier. EHza- 
bflh. N. J. Eiled M.irch 14, IS99. Renewed 
June 15. 1900. Serial No. 20.474. (No model.) 



Til. c.imbination in an escapement of a scape- 
wbee!, a pivoted lever having locking-pallets 
thereon, means for oscillating the lever whereby 
the said pallets are alternately engaged by the 
teetl; of the scape-wheel, and connection between 
the scape-wheel and the said oscillating means 
whereby the initi.al oscillation of said means and 
of the lever is imparted by the initial movement 
•'I the scape-wheel, the parts being so arranged 
that when in the position of rest the pallets lie 
out of the path of movement of the teeth of the 
scape-wheel and said teeth are free from contact. 




Jewelry and kindred lines. 

Have you our1901 Cataiogue? 

"The New York Jeweier,” 

The most Complete Published. 

S. F. MYERS CO., 
48-50 MAIDEN LANE, N. Y. 


Neater Work. 

SAVING 
OF TII^E. 

SCHNEIDER’S 

SOLDERING 
FLUID, 

A Substitute 
for Borax. 

PRICE. 

1 oz., 4o/., 

lOc. 25c. 

S oz., HJoz., 

40c. 60c. 

Brife for f^iiotafionH 
In harKerOuiiiilit es. 

^Manufactured by EMIL SCHNEIDER, Newark, n. j 

Gold and Silver Refiner ; Sweep Smelter. 

L. W. NimsCHKE, 

DIE SINKING, DESIGNING, 

Stamping for the Trade, 

203 Centre Street, 

Entrance corner Howard St., NEW YORK 


Cleanliness. 



t!«7,l.si. S.\FETY W ATCII - C.‘\RRYING DE- 
VICE. Jennie Beebe. Los Angeles, Cal., 
assignor of one-half to John Cristian Haag, 
same place. Eiled Feb. 26, 1900. Serial No. 
6.632. (No model.) 



The circular spring device consisting of two 
spring sides, two spring-loops at the top connect- 
ing these spring sides, springs having upper and 
lower hooks attached to one of the spring sides 
for engaging the pocket. 

(iUT.li.T:!. ,\PP,VREL-BELT. Emma Roberton, 
New York, N. Y. Filed March 21, 1900. 
Serial No. 9,512. (No model.) 



\ belt, comprising a strap having a plurality of 
cross-pieces mounted thereon and movable thereon 
throughout its length, said cross-pieces being each 
composed of a flexible covering in which is placed 
a flexible strip of stiffening material. 

GU7,:507. BUCKLE. Albert F. Fuller, New- 
ark, N. J., assignor to the J. E. Mergott Co., 
of New Jersey. Filed Oct. 8, 1900. Serial 
No. 32,368. (No model.) 

<!<!7,;{OfS. BUCKLE, -\lbert F. Fuller, New- 
ark, N. J., assignor to the J. E. Mergott Co., 
of New Jersey. Filed Oct. 27, 1900. Serial 
No. 34,566. (No model.) 

<><>7,. ‘{20. ALARM-CLOCK. .^RTHUR Junghans, 
Schramberg, Germany. Filed Oct. 16, 1900. 
Serial No. 33 208. (No model.) 



In an alarm-clock, the combination, with one of 
tlie toothed wheels of the alarm-train, of a tooth, 
a spring normally holding the said tooth out of 
contact with the said wheel, and means for moving 
the said tooth into the forward path of one of the 
teeth of the said wheel against the pressure of the 
said spring, whereby the said tooth and wheel be- 
come interlocked until the said wdieel is moved in 
the reverse direction in rewinding the alarm-train. 
<i<;7,l02. WATCHMAKER’S TOOL. Louis 
Reichert, Scranton, Pa. Filed Aug. 9, 1900. 
Serial No. 26,378. (No model.) 


connects with the post, open, and the other end 
also open and provided with a bearing for a spring, 
a hollow shoe section slidably arranged in said 
barrel and serving as a casing for a spring, said 
slidable shoe section having its end toward the 
post end of the barrel provided with a spring- 
bearing, a stem or rod in said shoe section or 



casing secured to said casing at the bearing 
therein for the spring and extending from said 
spring-bearing out from the barrel at or near the 
spring-bearing of said barrel, and a spring en- 
circling said rod or stem and having one portion 
resting within the slidable shoe section or casing 
against the bearing within the same, and the re- 
maining portion of the spring, in its normal posi- 
tion, projecting from said casing into the barrel 
and resting against the spring-bearing thereof. 
<>«7,«.-$l. BUTTON OR STUD. Halsey M. 
Larter, Newark, N. J., assignor of two- 
thirds to Frederick H. Larter and Harry C. 
Larter, same place. Filed Sept. 10, 1898. 
Serial No. 690,673. (No model.) 



The herein-described stud or button comprising 
a recessed shank formed of a piece of metal tubing 
bent at right angles and having the bend rounded 
to facilitate passage through a buttonhole, a head 
fastened to one end of said shank, a solid filler 
arrangea inside at the bend and a tubular plunger 
in the other end, the shank and filler being per- 
forated at the bend to provide an outpassage for 
said plunger, an integral lip bent radially inward 
at the free end of the arm in which the plunger 
lies and the plunger being longitudinally slotted 
to receive said lip, a spiral spring lying in said 
plunger and bearing at one end against said lip 
and at the other end against the closed end of the 
plunger, a conical cap at the forward end of the 
plunger and a stop projection d', at the rear end 
adapted to enter a recess i, in the shank and en- 
gage the filler to limit the forward movement of 
the plunger. 

Design BRACELET. Thomas S. Ben- 


mm 


nett. Providence, R. L, assignor to Albert 
C. Becken, Chicago, 111. Filed Nov. 9, 1900. 
Serial No. 35,987. Term of patent 3Vi years. 
Design 34,021*. COLLAR-BUTTO.N. Lewis 





i As an article of manufacture a device for ad- 
justing the jewels in watch-pallets consisting of a 
plate having a series of openings therein corre- 
sponding in their general outlines to, and adapted 
to receive, different forms of pallets, tlie walls of 
I said openings in front of the jewels being so lo- 
j cated as to form stops or gages adapted to limit 
j the outward movement of the jewels when the 
latter are in proper position for working. 

I <J«i7,r,74. BUTTON FOR SHIRTS, ETC. 
Charles A. Pierson, Newark, N. J., as- 
■signor to Frederick II. Larter, Harry C. 
Larter and Halsey M. Larter, same place. 
Filed Jan. 3, 1899. Serial No. 700,914. (No 
model.) 

I A button comprising a head, a shank having a 
post connected to said head and a tubular barrel 
disposed at right angles to said post or approx- 
imately so, said barrel having one end, where it 


Geisert. New York, N. Y. Filed Dec. 1, 
1900. Serial No. 38,375. Term of patent 3>4 
years. 

Design .34.4*25. THERMOMETER. Willi.am 



Rotstei), Chicago, 111. Filed Dec. 24, 1900. 
Serial No. 40,985. Term of patent seven 
years. 

Trade- .Mark .35..S4J*. FOUNTAIN - PENS. L. 
E. Waterman Co., New York, N. Y. Filed 
Jan. 2, 1901. 




February 13, 1901. 


THE JEWELERS’ CIRCULAR-WEEKLY. 


49 


WATERMAN’S IDEAL. 

Essential feature . — The words “W aterman’s 
Idea l.” Used since July I, 1883. 

Label 8,113. Title: “McGEE'S EYE WATER.” 
i(For Eye-Water.) John J. McGee, Woon- 
socket, R. I. Filed Jan. 15, 1901. 


EXPIRED PATENTS. 


[Reported specially for The Jewelers’ Circular- 
Weekly by R. W. Bishop, Patent Attorney, Wash- 
ingrton, D. C., who will furnish complete copies of 
patents at the rate of 10 cents each.] 


J. C. Harrington, 

G. E. Hart, Water- 
to the Waterbury 


Issued Feb. 5. 18S4. 

292,810. EARRING. Bernhard Hartmann, 
New York, N. Y. 

292.837. NECKTIE HOLDER AND 
FASTENER. H. F. Miller, New York, 
N. Y. 

292.838. WATCH-WINDING MECHANISM. 
R. F. Mitchell, New Haven, Conn. 

292,870. ESCAPEMENT FOR TORSION- 
PENDULUMS. Charles Stahlberg, Cor- 
sicana, Tex. 

292,875. SHOW-CASE AND TRAY. Edward 
Todd, New York, N. Y. 

292,909. PENCIL-CASE. J. C. Haring, Jersey 
City, N. J. 

292,917. POCKET - KNIFE. F. W. Kalden- 
bach, Solingen, Germany, assignor to Alex- 
ander Coppel, same place. 

292,954. KEY -TAG. J. C. Russell, Boston, 
Mass., assignor to Tobias New, New York, 
N. Y. 

292,959. EYEGLASSES. J. S. Spencer, New 
York, N. Y. 

292.962. SYNCHRONIZING CLOCKS. C. N. 
Talbot, Flushing, N. Y. 

292.963. FINGER-RING. Otto Thie, Union, 
N. J. 

293,016. BRACELET. 

Providence, R. I. 

293,018. WATCH-PLATE, 
bury. Conn., assignor 
Watch Co., same place. 

293,042. M'ATCH. C. D. Leger, Waterbury, 
Conn., assignor to the Waterbury Watch ,Co., 
same place. 

293,044. ADJUSTABLE FINGER-RING. 
Benj. Lewkowitz, New York, N. Y. 

293,046. WATCH-iMOVEMENT. E. A. Locke, 
Waterbury, Conn., assignor to the Waterbury 
Watch Co., same place. 

293,063. PENDULUM. Levi Orser. Mobile, 
Ala. 

293,074. REFRIGERATING DISH -COVER. 
A.. C. Pecor, Baltimore, Md. 

293,096. MUSIC-BOX ATTACHMENT FOR 
CLOCKS.. Jacob Schmid, Brunswick, N. J. 

293,102. MANUFACTURE OF BUTTONS 
OR STUDS. T. W. F. Smitten, Brooklyn, 
N. Y. 

293,127. GAGE FOR HAIR-SPRING STUDS. 
J. P. Mathier, Chicago, 111. 

293.142. MAINSPRING BARREL. D. A. A. 
Buck, Waterbury, Conn., assignor to the 
Waterbury Watch Co., same place. 

293.143. WATCH - MOVEMENT. D. A. A. 
Buck, Waterbury, Conn., assignor to the 
Waterbury Watch Co., same place. 

293.168. STEM - WINDING WATCH. G. E. 
Hart, Waterbury, Conn., assignor to the 
Waterbury Watch Co., same place. 

293.169. COMPENSATING WATCH - BAL- 
ANCE. G. E. Hart, W'aterbury, Conn., as- 
signor to the Waterbury Watch Co., same 
place. 

293.170. WATCH-DIAL. G. E. Hart, Water- 
bury, Conn., assignor to the Waterbury 
Watch Co., same place. 

Designs issued Feb. 6, iSg4, for seven years. 

23,032. SASH-RIBBON BUCKLE. W. A. 
Fearn, Columbus, O. 

23,034. KNIFE. J. T. Curran, Brooklyn, N. Y., 
assignor to Tiffany & Co., New York, N. Y. 
Designs issued Aug. 5, iSgy, for 5% years. 

27,452, HANDLE FOR SPOONS. Chris Sil- 
BER, Meriden, Conn., assignor to the Meriden 
Britannia Co., same place. 

27,457. GLASS VESSEL. J. D. Bergen, Meri- 
den, Conn., assignor to the J. D. Bergen Co., 
same place. 


REAL EBONY 

Combination Traveling Set. 



Our Mr. William Andrews is now in the South, Mr. 
A. Weiss is West and Mr. H. Greenthal is East show- 
ing our Fine New Line of Real Ebony and Rosewood Toilet 
Articles, as well as the Latest Novelties in Leather Goods, 


5 


J. J. COHN, 

Manufacturer of Leather Goods 

And Importer of Ebony and Rosewood Toilet Articles, 

35 MAIDEN EANE, = - - NEW YORK. 

CHICAGO OFFICE, 131 WABASH AVE. 








“ B. A.” Gold Shell Collar Buttons 

are guaranteed as follows: “We will 

replace every ‘ B. A.’ button which for 
any reason proves unsatisfactory.” This 
guarantee is on the back of 
each card and our trade-mark 
embossed on the front. ^ 


SHELL. 

REGISTERED. 


B. A. BALLOU & CO., 

Providence, R. 1. 











SUBJECT: 

‘l)ow to treat Customers— l>ow to Sell/' 


That this department shall prove mutually beneficial to our readers, it is desirable that the 
members of the trade generally communicate with The Jewelers’ Circular-Weekly regarding 
any advantageous device or plan that they are utilizing in connection with their business. 


PRIZE ESSAY COnPETITION, NO. 2. 


No. 3. 

Prize Essay Competition. 

First Prize, $20. 
Second Prize, $ 10. 


These prizes will be given to the writers of 
essajs on the subject 

“How to Foster Spring 
Trade.” 

The prizes will be for the best and most rea- 
>onable essays, not for the language in which 
:he ideas are expressed. Anyone may enter, 
whether be be a retailer, salesman or any 
employe. 

The standing of the judges who have kindly 
consented to act is a guarantee that the con- 
test will be carried on strictly on its merits 
and in an absolutely fair and impartial man- 
oer. We shall designate each contribution by 
a letter, keeping a list of contributors with 
ie letters oi their articles. Thus the judges 
will not even know the names of the writers 
whose nroducts they pass upon. 


RULES: 

tssays must be in this office by Feb. 15, 1901. 
Essays must be written on one side of paper. 
^0 limit to number of words, and specimens of 
records are admissible. 


NOTE!.— The Jewelers' Circular-Weekly 
reserves the right to publish any or all of the 
competing essays receive<l. 

Preference will be given, all other things be- 
ing equal, to those whose contributions reach 
at the earliest date. 


ANOTHER BEAN GUESSING CONTEST. 


rjETIT & CARSON’, New Rochelle. 
■ N. Y., had recently a bean guessing 
>nti:it at their store. The beans were 
contained in a large glass bowl, which was 
dir, played in onf of their show windows. 
The contest closed on New Year’s Eve. 
■Much interest was created in the guessing, 
as over .V;-i gue^ - i were received by the 
firm. When the beans were counted it 
'.V.O found that there were .5,029, and that 
the nearest gue.-,'. sent in was by Miss Liz- 
zie Boyd, of Burling lane. Her guess was 
•5.017. The next nearest guessers were 
Henry Scott, .5,001, and D. W. Van Cott, 
•5 -;:;:;. The prize offered was a handsome 
•ilk umbrella, with a gold handle inlaid 
with mother-of-pearl. 


first principle in business is the 
Golden Rule, “Do unto others as 
you would have them do unto you.” And 
I believe if this were practiced more in the 
jewelry business there would not be so 
much suspicion attached to our line. 
When a customer enters my store I do 
not jump to the conclusion that he or she 
has come to buy. So my first endeavor 
is to make the customer feel at home, 
then to wear a pleasant look and have a 
civil word or two, and if it should turn 
out that the party has come on some 
begging expedition I give with good 
grace. Or if the customer hands a watch 
to examine and I find a piece of pegwoo l 
sticking in it, I pull it out; or if the hair 
spring is caught, I unhitch it and I ban 1 
the watch to the customer. If the party 
asks how much is the job, I tell him or 
her there is no charge, with just as much 
grace as I would receive $5. 

I have been in the retail jewelry business 
for the last 20 years and I know I have 
never lost anything by treating customers 
in this way. If the customer wants to 
buy I try to sell what is wanted, not what 
I would like to sell. But when the 
customer leaves it to my judgment I al- 
ways advise to the best of my knowledge 
what is the best, even if I don’t make as 
much profit on the article as I would if 
I sold what he or she would have selected 
without my advice. I also make it a rule 
never to guarantee any article I am not 
sure of; for instance, if a person wants a 
rolled plate chain, I show the different 
kinds and say that the higher price I ask 
is a sign that I paid more for the goods. 
Now, the customer cannot expect a chain 
for .$1.50 to wear as well as a chain for 
$9 or $10. If I sold a good make of chain 
for a good price and I see that it did not 
give satisfaction, I give another; but I 
never give a guarantee, as some of the best 
rolled plate articles will sometimes go 
back on a person, and I feel I do better 
by niy customer in replacing the chain li 
I think that it did not give satisfaction. 
-A.gain, I make it a point to make a fair 
profit on all sales and work. But the 
work must be good and the goods I sell 
must be as represented. I have found by 
conducting my business on these lines 
that I have always been successful and 
have heard of expressions from the public 

something like this; “Go to ; he will 

charge you a good price, but you can bet 
on what he tells you and you know what 


you buy. When he does a piece of work 
he does it. A child can buy just as cheap 
and just as good as an experienced person.” 
Now, in the case of goods to be exchanged 
I am just as anxious to exchange as I w.ts 
to sell, for I want my customer to be 
pleased, and if I have not got just what 
will please, I cheerfully return the money. 
In such cases I have always retained my 
customer. 

I think the foregoing are the most vital 
points to follow in our line as to how to 
treat a customer and covers partly how to 
sell, but would add that 'to sell goods the 
first thing is to have the store as neat and 
clean as possible. Then the stock must be 
kept clean, the silver ware bright, with 
clean cards and nice cases, for the best 
salesman cannot sell when things are slov- 
enly and dirty. Then sell goods on their 
merit, do not over-guarantee anything and 
tell the truth about every article. A man 
who starts in to misrepresent and try to 
make all the money he can may succeed for 
a short time. But he will find out that hio 
customers, one by one, will leave him, un- 
til at last he is forced to give up. For 
such principles have never yet paid in the 
long run, while I will warrant that any 
young man starting with my plan will not 
only make money but will retain that 
which is more valuable, honor, which will 
gain him the confidence and esteem of the 
community in which he lives. X. 


I N any retail business, especially the jew- 
elry and kindred lines, where goods or 
merchandise of beauty, art or ornamenta- 
tion are sold to customers, a large majori- 
ty of whom are ladies and people of culti- 
vated taste and refinement, it is absolutely 
necessary for the salesman, whether he be 
proprietor or clerk, to treat and receive 
all customers with a cheerful smile and 
pleasant manner and to readily apologize 
for mistakes or misunderstandings, with- 
out displaying anger or contempt. He 
should be on the alert for opportuniti. s 
to render small favors, and also endeavor 
to show a feeling of sincere welcome. 

All clerks and salesmen are not gifted 
with a pleasant disposition and affable man- 
ner, or can submit to rebukes or accusa- 
tions that are often experienced behind the 
retail counter without showing in some 
degree anger or resentment; but a pleas- 
ant disposition can be largely acquired by 
diligent practice and forethought. Re- 


sentment is only permissible to a salesman 
when the honesty, integrity or reputation 
of the firm or business has been basely or 
unjustly attacked; even then it should be 
defended in a dignified and forcible but 
gentle manner. To do this successfully, 
giving justice to all concerned and retain- 
ing the customer, requires judgment and 
cordiality. 

A young man will never be a good sales- 
man until he has complete control of his 
disposition. He must also know the stock 
and class of goods the store has for sale 
to such an extent that he has a ready an- 
swer to any question that may be asked 
about them. 

An important duty of a salesman when 
a customer enters is to learn what the cus- 
tomer wants. Some customers are averse 
to giving this desired and valuable infor- 
mation (due probably from previous deal- 
ings with unreliable houses), but the good 
salesman will bring the full power of his 
tact into use. This information is indis- 
pensable, even if it must be obtained un- 
knowingly to the customer. If all other 
methods fail it must be surmised from the 
impression received by observing the gen- 
eral attitude, speech and manner of the 
intending purchaser. 

Many good salesmen may lose a sale, 
but he is not a good salesman who cannot 
tell the cause of losing a sale. 

A knowledge of physiognomy and hu- 
man nature will be found a valuable ac- 
cessory to the clerk and salesman, as it will 
enable him to form a correct view of cus- 
tomers the moment they enter. 

He who wishes to be a successful sales- 
man must be temperate. One with de- 
bauched countenance and bloodshot eyes 
cannot successfully sell goods and main- 
tain the reputation of his employer’s busi- 
ness. A business reputation can be ruined 
in a day, while it takes years of work, hon- 
est)' and fidelity to make one. Therefore, 
the salesmen and clerks must guard their 
employer’s business reputation as they 
would their own character. D. 


LOVING CUP PRIZE TO CHAMPION 
WALTZER. 

lUDSON S. NEWING, jeweler, Bing- 
hamton. N. Y., writes the following 
letter to The Leader of that city: 

Binghamton, Feb. 6. 

To the Editor of The Leader: Sir — Who 
is the champion prize waltzer of Broome 
county? That is a question that interests 
I a great many of the dance-goers of Bing- 
hamton. Now, to decide this question I 
will give a handsome silver loving cup to 
the social club in the city who will send 
the best representative to the prize waltz 
I to be given by the Ivy Leaf Social Club 
Monday evening, Feb. 11, at Odd Fellows’ 
hall. ^ I believe this ought to settle the 
question, as I understand all of the prize 
waltzers are members of the various clubs. 


Best Dressea minaows 

Jlmong tbe Retail Jewelers. 


Series II. No. XXIX. 


NOTE. — We inaugurated with the issue of May s, 
i8q 9, the second series of characteristic retail jewelers' 
windows. The first scries consisted of illustrations 
and descriptions of more than loo different displays, 
extending over a period of eight years. We desire 
any jeweler who thinks his window is interesting or 
calculated to serve as a lesson to his brother jewelers, 
to send to us a photograph of such window for illus- 
tration under this department. 


H ere is presented an original sugges- 
tion for a Washington’s Birthday win- 
dow. On either side of the bust of Wash- 
ington, which stands out against a back- 
ground of palms, are placed field glasses. 


telescopes and small flag draped pictures 
of Revolutionary battles. In the central 
foreground are placed a hatchet and a 
branch of a cherry tree encircled with 
rings. At one side of this group are 
placed sword pins, souvenir spoons, etc. 
On the other side is a small clock sup- 
ported by tiny guns. Chains or necklaces 
form the letters “Feb. 22, 1732.” 


WINDOW DEVICES. 


W INDOW dressing and display as a 
means of advertising is to-day an 
important thing. Many people walk along 
the street merely to glance at brightly fur- 
nished windows with late products in any 
line of merchandise. It is nof even neces- 
sary to go to any great expense or to em- 


ploy an experienced window dresser to 
achieve good effects. Little novelties 
often do the trick. 

An English paper suggests a clock with 
a 12-inch diameter placed at an angle in 
the window with a nicely painted, bright 
colored card sign, eight by 20 inches, ad- 
vertising some article placed immediately 
above or below the clock and changed 
every few days, which will prove an excel- 
lent and attractive advertising medium. 
Everybody looks at a clock, and under 
those conditions cannot help but see the 
sign. 

JEWELERS’ BRIGHT AD. SAYINGS. 


The way rings are made has more to do 
with their real value than is usually sup- 


posed. You cannot detect a trace of sol- 
der on the rings we sell. An expert would 
tell you that these settings are solid and 
absolutely secure. — ^Ferguson & Craig, 
Champaign, 111. 

The watches that you have bought here 
this Christmas have passed from us to you 
but our interest in them hasn’t passed. 
They must do good service. Must tell the 
truth about the time, else they will make 
us untruthful. Remember that a watch 
needs fostering until it gets steadied down 
to the daily task of going an even gait. 
An occasional visit here will help it. — 
George E. Feagans, Joliet, 111. • 

Little eye ills grow to big ones. Have 
any of your children complained about 
their eyes or head? — Kendall Optical Co., 
Harrisburgh, Pa. 



ORIGINAL SUGGESTION FOR A WASHINGTON’S BIRTHDAY WINDOW. 




THE JEWELERS’ CIRCULAR-WEEKLY. 


February 13, 1901. 


FOR THE. NEW YEAR ! 


TO THE RETAIL JEWELRY TRADE: 

We offer the result of more than Fifty Years of 
Ring Making, confident that the methods we now employ enable us to furnish you the most 
desirable goods for QUALITY, STYLE and PRICE obtainable. 

are most worthy of your attention. Do not 
neglect their purchase. Goods sent on 
approval to responsible parties. 

M. B. BRYANT 6 CO., 7 MAIDEN LANE. NEW YORK. 





BONNER & CO., 

j FINE DIAMOND MOUN'TINGS, f 

49 JOHN STREET. • « « NEW YORK. 

O RUC I B L-eS. 

Jewelers’ Supplies, 

Wfm uj||f 

NBW YORK. 

ALOIS KOHN & CO., ^ ^oud gold chains, 

^ 4 MAIDEN LANE Near Broadway, N. Y« 

We call the attention of the Trade throughout tho country to our line of 

LORGNETTE AND GUARD CHAINS. 

W’ill send Samples on Memorandum on receipt of satisfactory reference. Correspondence 

Solicited. 

WOOD ENGRAVINGS. 



THE TRIUMPH 


-OF— 


The guarantee of the CROWN and LION 
cases means that a brand-new case of 
the same grade will be given free of charge 
for any Crown or Lion case that fails to 
wear the full guaranteed period. 


GROWN and LION CASES 

in 1900 has spurred the 
makers to still greater ef- 
forts, and they start the 
new year and century with 
a magnificent new line and 
an unprecedented variety 
of styles and patterns. 

There are no makes of 
filled cases now on the 
market so firmly or justly 
fixed in trade favor. Sal- 
ability and satisfaction 
given have placed them 
first in quick=selling, prof- 
it-making staple stocks. 

SOLD BY ALL 

LEADING JOBBERS. 



CONDUCTED BY GEORGE A. ROGERS. 


32d Year. WEDNESDAY, FEBRUARY 13, 1901. Vol. XLII. No. 2. 


MOTE — Under this department.^ all matters of a 
technical or a news character bearing upon the 
optical branch of the jewelry industry will be con- 
sidered. Address communications to The jewelers’ 
Circular Pub. Co., Ti fohn St., New York. 


A side from the 
social question 
OPTICIANS. and the question of 

the “eternal fitness 
of things,” optometry opens up a field in 
which women of the right mental and phy- 
sical poise find play- for their natural tal- 
ents. Optometry is so essentially a work 
of fine details, finely executed, that there 
can be no surprise at the success of some 
women in this field. Her natural gifts and 
talents are in her fav'or, and natural apti- 
tude counts for so much and education 
without such aptitude counts for so little, 
that it is not to be wondered at if some 
women fairly put their male compeers 
upon their mettle. At present there are 
few women opticians, .but the percentage 
of women students of optometry seems to 
be on the increase. Unless social condi- 
tions greatly change this percentage is 
likely to increase and lady opticians will be 
as prevalent as, if not. more prevalent than, 
lady doctors, lady lawyers, lady dentists, 
etc. As compared with the other profes- 
sions, optometry is far more appropriate, 
it must be confessed, as there is nothing 
about it that raises any question involving 
delicacy of consideration or one that a 
woman may not discuss with any person. 
From the social standpoint, however, it is 
to be regretted that women should be com- 
pelled to engage in any of these depart- 
ments of endeavor. 


I N the matter of op- 
tical legislation 
LEGISLATION. Opticians of Illinois 
who entertained the 
view that a law creating a board of exam- 
iners, whose license would be required to 
entitle opticians to practice optometry, 
have received a setback in the late deci- 
sion of the Supreme Court of that State, 
relative to a similar law creating and giv- 
ing arbitrary power to a board of phar- 
macy. The latter law has been declared 
unconstitutional and void, and on the per- 
fectly legitimate grounds that it was class 
legislation and deprived people of their 
rights under the -Constitution, which in 
Illinois are specially protected by clauses 
in the Constitution aimed directly at such 
discriminating legislation. 

.A.n optical law of a similar character 


would be exceedingly difficult to get 
through the Legislature under these cir- 
cumstances, and it would be of no effect 
if passed, unless everything the opticians 
aim to accomplish by it is taken out of the 
bill, which would, of course, leave matters 
in the same condition as now. There was 
serious opposition to the law, or proposed 
law, in the Illinois Optical Society, as 
shown at the last meeting. This opposi- 
tion has now even more tangible grounds 
for opposing legislative action of a'ly kind. 
As has been pertinently suggested many 
times in the past, you can’t legislate knowl- 
edge or capacity into a human being. 

The next question is. What is to be done 
about it? We would suggest that the Op- 
tical Society of the State of Illinois adopt 
a standard of qualification for full membei-- 
ship, and that it issue to full members — 
those who pass the examination and are 
eligible in all other respects — a certificate 
setting forth the qualification. As it would 
not be policy at the "present time to ex- 
clude any deserving person who desires to 
become a member, any applicant might be- 
come simply a business member and be 
entitled to all the general advantages of 
membership by the payment of the mem- 
bership fee, being given a specific time, 
perhaps one year, in which to qualify him- 
self for full membership, which he would 
be expected to do if he continued his con- 
nection with the society. The rule should 
be retroactive, affecting all present as well 
as future members, from the president 
down. It could be provided that repre- 
sentatives of optical journals need not 
qualify for full membership, but would con- 
tinue as business members rrierely, thereby 
being eligible to office or to any committee 
except the committee on qualifications of 
members. The effects of such action on 
the part of the Illinois Society could not 
but be beneficial upon all optical organi- 
zations. The question of a standard of 
qualification would soon settle itself and 
be based upon the committee’s questions 
to applicants. The optical college pro- 
fessors would certainly not object to ques- 
tions from their compeers, and afterward 
they would aim to make their graduates 
proficient in the directions necessary to 
pass the examination of the optical S'ciety 
or societies. The societies would thus con- 
trol the colleges by prescribing the quali- 
fications of membership of societies out- 
side of the colleges. No college whose 
students could not pass these examinations 
would be able to do business, and the dif- 
ferent schools would at once come in touch 


with the societies for the purpose of rais- 
ing the standard to the point at which it 
should rest. This is a much better solu- 
tion of the question than legislation. The 
society, to protect itself, would adopt a 
code of ethics by which its members would 
be governed, and no one should be al- 
lowed to pursue a course that would re- 
flect upon the sdciety and retain still his 
membership. The society would not need 
to worry, as some of its members seem to 
have done, over the “short term” of opti- 
cal schools, but could devote all their 
spare time to seeing that their own quali- 
fications were up to the standard. The 
college men would get together and in- 
sist upon an advanced standard, although 
it might not be considered good policy to 
institute a too difficult examination to be- 
gin with. The fees for these examinations 
and certificates should be modest, but they 
ought to help out the society treasury to 
some extent, as well as pay the expenses 
involved in holding the examinations. 


Spectacle Optics for Photographers. 


A S a matter of elementary education, if 
one makes any pretence at all to an 
acquaintance with science, or professes a 
really intelligent and enlightened interest 
in the affairs of every-day life, one should 
know something about the dioptric sys- 
tem of nomenclature. For its use is of the 
greatest help to understanding the ration- 
ale of adapting spectacles — surely the first 
thing that should excite the curiosity of 
anyone concerning himself with applied op- 
tics. To illustrate what is meant, there is 
a rule — a sound one, within reasonable 
limitations — that presbyopia, a normal and 
unavoidable affection of the eyes due to 
old age, calls for spectacles having ID. 
additional power for each five years of age 
after the age of 40 . To understand why 
this is, by learning something of the mean- 
ing of accommodation, long sight and 
short sight, is a task easily within the ca- 
pacity of almost anyone. London Optician. 

The L. C. Henrichsen Co., Portland, 
Ore., are quite busy in their optical de- 
partment. 

The Keppler Jewelry Co.. Anaconda. 
Mont., have employed George H. Shir- 
key, who is a thorough workman and 
graduate optician. They have spared 
neither time nor means in fitting up their 
optical department in a scientific man- 
ner. 


54 


February 13, 1901. 


THE JEWELERS’ CIRCULAR-WEEKLY^ 


Optica) Departtncm. 

ICemtiHufJ /rom fjge J^?.] 

DIOPTRIC CONDITIONS OF THE 
EYE AND HOW TO DISCOVER 
AND MEASURE THEH. 


EMMETROPIA. 

T he normal eye, the eye that is optically 
correct, is a desirable though rare 
possession. Perhaps the optician is preju- 
diced and gets his idea of its rarity from 
the fact that it is an eye he seldom meets, 
because its fortunate possessor has little 
use for him or his services, at least during 
the earlier years of life or before well on 
toward old age. He may never arrive at 
the latter period, for if “the good die 
young” good eyes may go with them be- 
yond the optician's field of practice. 

Emmetropia needs study. It is the model 
eye. The best correction for an eye is the 
correction that gives it the nearest possi- 
ble semblance in its action to the emme- 
tropic eye. The optician should know the 
emmetropic eye more thoroughly than 
any other kind of eye. Fig. 1. It may 



FIG. 1. — EMMETROPIC EYE VIEWING DIS- 
T.\NT OBJECT — “x ” INDICATES DISTANCE 
OF OBJECT; “O,” NO ACCOMMODATION; 

F,” THE FOCUS. 

be ideal to many, but to the optician it 
should be real, for that is the kind of eye 
he endeavors, under all sorts of varying 
circumstances, to construct. One thing, 
quality or power is possessed by the eye, 
however, if we regard it as the organ of 
vision, which it is in a superficial point 
of view, that the optician cannot modify, 
and that is the power of vision itself. He 
cannot make an eye see. He cannot help 
it to see. The eye does all the seeing for 
itself. It sees perfectly or imperfectly ac- 
cording to its power or visual acuity, and 
all the lenses in creation will not help it 
in the least. 

What docs the eye see? It sees the 
image upon the retina. That is the be- 
ginning, not the end, of seeing. If the 
retinal image is blurred it is the best of 
vision to see the blur just as it appears 
upon the retina. It would be an anoma- 
lous eye that, with a blurred image on 
the retina, would see anything else than 
a blur. When the optician, by the impo- 
sition of lenses, makes the retinal image 
;harp and clearly defined, he does not im- 
prove the vision, but gives the eye or 
visual power something different to see. 
The retinal image is, from the standpoint 
of sensation, not vision, but the object. 

gi;od eye, one possessed of the highest 
v-stia' power, sees this object just as it is, 
blurred or unblurred, as the case may be. 
But such an eye would not be necessarily 


emmetropic. Emmetropia is not a visual 
thing. It is an optical condition of the 
eye. An eye may be emmetropic but to- 
tally blind at the same time, or it may be 
emmetropic and partially blind. It may 
possess all degrees of visual power from 
absolute blindness to the highest visual 
power and be emmetropic or ametropic 
in all cases. 

What, then, is an emmetropic eye? It 
is an eye that, without muscular action, 
places a distinct image of distant objects 
on the retina, especially one point at a 
distance which is focused upon the center 
of the fovea centralis. If the power oi 
vision is normal, then, under the above 
circumstances, we say vision is normal. 
The point in the world — the point of fixa- 
tion — and the central point in the fovea 
are in conjugate focus. A pencil of light 
proceeding from the point of fixation is 
focused upon the center of the fovea, and 
this without muscular action by which the 
composite lens in the forward part of the 
eye is given more than its static dioptric 
power. Points adjoining the point of 
fixation are focused with almost equal 
accuracy at other points of the retina, so 
that all the light from each individual 
point of the object impinges upon one 
distinct retinal point, producing the im- 
age. Each such point in the object is in 
conjugate focus with its point at the re- 
tina. As to the distance of the object, if 
the lens system of the eye focuses the 
light from a point *20 feet away it will so 
nearly focus points at an infinite distance 
that 20 feet is regarded as optical infinity. 

In emmetropia, the- retina has, without 
accommodative action, a clear and sharply 
defined image of the distant object. As 
the image is really the beginning of vis- 
ion, the object itself so far as vision is 
concerned, it not only has normal visual 
acuity but a distinct object to see. Vis- 
ion is not blurred because the object is 
not blurred. But while the emmetropic 
eye is directed to the distant objects 
nearer objects at one side of the line of 
vision may intervene. They cannot be 
accurately imaged upon the retina. There 
is the double reason for being visually un- 
conscious of them: they are out of the 

direct line of vision and imperfectly fo- 



FIG. 2. — EMMETROPIC EYE VIEWING OB- 
JECT AT 20 IN. THE ACCOMMODATION ( A ) 
SHOWN BY THE CRESCENT ON THE LENS 
IS 2d. 

cused. To obtain a clear retinal image 
of near objects it is nccc.'sary for the eye 
to exercise muscular force — to use the 
accommodation — and by such action to so 
increase the dioptric power of the lens 
that pencils of light from the near object 
will be focusecl upon the retina, produc- 
ing a clear image. Fig. 2. But the stan- 


dard capacity of the emmetropic eye is its 
capacity to focus the light from distant 
points upon the retina without muscular 
action rather than its power, by accom- 
modation, to focus light from the near 
object. What it may do in the latter re- 
spect depends upon its accommodative 
power and not upon its emmetropia, but 
the emmetropic eye, since it uses none of 
its accommodation for the distant object, 
has all of its accommodative power to be 
used for near objects. This is really the 
greatest advantage possessed by it. 

The standard eye is then an eye not 
based upon visual power, for visual power 
and emmetropia are quite unconnected. 
It. is an eye that has infinity for its point 
of rest, for only when viewing the distant 
object is it at rest muscularly. When 
viewing distance it is under no muscular 
tension nor nerve strain. In viewing OD- 
jects 20 feet or more away, which com- 
prises so large a part of services the eye 
renders, it is at complete rest. Rest is 
essential to muscles and nerves, especially 
motor nerves. But work is also essential. 
The muscles and nerves of the emme- 
tropic eye rest when the distant object is 
being viewed; they work when the near 
object engages attention. This is normal 
and healthful exercise. There is no strain, 
unless the eyes are over used for near 
objects, and they will even stand a great 
amount of abuse without serious protest. 
The picture of emmetropia (see figure) 
should be thoroughly impressed upon the 
mind so that it may be comprehended in 
its entirety and all its advantages be duly 
appreciated. 

An emmetropic eye is the same for ail 
meridians. It does not focus telegraph 
wires upon the retina while yet incapable 
of focusing the telegraph posts, but every 
object, horizontal or vertical, round, 
square, or oblong, is given its due form 
and proportion in the retinal image. 
What the image is so the object appears. 
The action of the lens system of the eye 
and of each dioptric surface by which im- 
ages are imposed upon the retina is a 
most complex affair and would require 
many articles of this length to fully state. 
But knowledge of the action of each sur- 
face for an ordinary or average emme- 
tropic eye would not materially help the 
optician to fit a pair of defective eyes. It 
is not, therefore, practical to go into these 
details, however interesting they may be, 
unless there should prove to be a demand 
for such minute data. Emmetropic eyes 
are not necessarily alike in their various 
dimensions and dioptric factors. They are 
only alike in their composite effect — a 
perfect retinal image of the distant object 
without accommodative action. 

(To be continued.) 


The “line of sight” — a secondary axis of 
the eye — is the straight line connecting the 
fovea centralis with the point of fixation 
(that is. the object looked at); and the 
angle between this and the major axis of 
the corneal ellipse is called a. It may 
reach 10° -or 12° in the horizontal plane. 
The “line of fixation” joins not the fovea 
centralis but the center of rotation of the 
eye with the object fixed; and the angle 
between this and the principal axis of the 
eye is called y.— London Optician. 


February 13, 1901. 


THE JEWELERS’ CIRCULAR-WEEKLY. 


55 


Optical Departtnem. 

{^Continued from page 


Opticians Win a Point. 


Their Opposition to the Original Bell Bill In 
the New York Legislature Bears Fruit. 

The opticians have apparently won one 
important point in their fight against New 
York Assembly bill No. 167, or the “Bell 
bill,’’ as it is popularly known. They have 
succeeded in convincing the Assembly 
Committee on Public Health that certain 
amendments are necessary to give the op - 
ticians proper protection and the promise 
has been given that such changes will be 
made. This developed Wednesday last, 
when the committee held a continued hear- 
ing on the bill at Albany. So much oppo- 
sition has materialized from the druggists, 
pharmacists and artificial limb makers, 
who would be seriously affected if the bill 
became a law, that the opticians have had 
a hard time convincing the medical men 
who are behind the bill and the committee- 
men in whose hands it is, of the justice ot 
their claims. But Wednesday, this was ac- 
complished, and unless there are changes 
made in the future, the bill will be gener- 
ally satisfactory to the optical interests in 
its present form. 

The representatives of the trade at Al- 
bany, Wednesday, were: President F. L. 
Swart, of the Optical Society of the State 
of New York; W, D. Oertel, chairman of 
the executive committee of the same so- 
ciety, and B. V. Smith, of Grey Optical 
Co., Albany. The bill with the changes 
now proposed will read as follows, the 
latest amendments being printed in italics: 

An act to amend Section 152 of Chapter 661 of 
the laws of 1893, entitled “An act in relation to the 
public health, constituting Chapter 25 of the gen- 
eral laws.” 

Section 1. Section 152 of 'Chapter 661 of the 
laws of 1893, entitled “An act in relation to the 
public health, constituting Chapter 25 of the gen- 
eral laws,” is hereby amended to read as follows: 

Section 152. Construction of this Article. — 
Any Person shall be rfgarued as pra' ticing >nedicine 
within the meaning of this act who shall profess to 
heal or who shall give t->'eatme7it to any other person 
by the use of any remedy^ age7it or 7)teth(d whatsoever ^ 
whether with or without the use of atty 77iedici7ie 
drug^ instr2i77ie7it or other applia7ice^ for the relief^ or 
cure^ of a/iy wounds fracture or bodily inj x ry, i}tfir7n- 
ity^ physical or 77iental^ or other defect or disease. 
This article shall not be construed as prokibititig 
the 77zanufacture., sale or use of any proprietary or 
Patent 77iediciney and where 7io diag7iosis is 7)iade by 
the 77iaker or seller thereof: or the givi7ig of te7upo7'ary 
relief in a7i e7)iergency by a registered phar7nacist or 
any person., or the do77iestic administratio7i of fa7tiily 
re7)iedies: nor shall it be co?istrued to affect commis- 
sioned officers serving in the United States army, 
navy or marine hospital service, while so commis- 


sioned; or any one while actually serving on the 
resident medical staff of any legally incorporated 
hospital; or any legally registered dentist exclu- 
sively engaged 'in practicing dentistry; cr any 
rights of chiropodists under exisiinglaws; or any man- 
ufacturer of artificial eyes, limbs or orthopedic in- 
struments or XxusSQS'f or 77ia7iufacturer or constructor 
of optical instru77i€7tts in fitting such instruments 
on persons in need thereof; etc. 

;Regarding the phrase “give treatment 
to,” which is not approved by some opti- 
cians, on account of the possible question 
as to the definition thereof, as referred to 
in The Circular-Weekly last week. Dr. 
E. E. Harris, president of the New York 
Medical Association, is quoted as saying 
that the word “treatment” in this connec- 
tion presupposes a diagnosis of a disease 
and a knowledge of medicine, and effectu- 
ally protects the public without infringing 
on individual rights. 


California State Association of Opticians. 


Stockton, Cal., Feb. 3. — The California 
Association of Opticians held their an- 
nual meeting, Jan. 21, 1901, in San Fran- 
cisco Hall, Alcazar building, San Fran- 
cisco. The California opticians are still 
full of vim and ambition. However, the 
one drawback is the great distance many 
of the members have to travel to attend 
the meetings. 

This meeting was the occasion of elec- 
tion of officers and a revision of the by- 
laws. The latter was left with the com- 
mittee until the next meeting, the third 
Monday in April, when there will be an 
extra long session to dispose of laws 
and business affairs for all time, so as 
to waste no time at the regular meetings. 
All future meetings will be devoted almost 
entirely to instructive lectures and to en- 
tertainment. 

First vice-president S. G. Marshutz, Los 
Angeles, was present at the meeting. He 
made a few remarks relative to the opti- 
cal business in his end of the State, and 
asserted emphatically the importance of 
a complete organization. 

The officers elected for the ensuing year 
are: President, E. M. Ackley, San Fran- 

cisco (re-elected) ; first vice-president, S. 
G. Marshutz, Los Angele^ (re-elected) ; 
second vice-president, C. L. Hogue, San 
Francisco; treasurer, W. H. Hunt, Oak- 
land (re-elected); secretary, G. L. 
Schneider, Stockton (re-elected). Mr. 
Hogue was appointed as a committee of- 
one to obtain instruction and entertain- 
ment for the next meeting. The meeting 
was exceedingly pleasant and cheerful, and 
was adjourned at a late hour. 


Optical Briefs and Notes. 


Gustave Holle, optician, Philadelphia, 
Pa., has moved from 15th St. and S. Penn 
Square to 1429 Chestnut St. 

Julius Lamb, optician, 267 S. 3d St., 
Philadelphia, Pa., was married about a 
fortnight ago to Miss Katharine Newman. 

Andrew V. Brown, son of D. V. Brown, 
Philadelphia, Pa., has returned from his 
southern wedding trip and taken up his 
home in Tioga with his bride, formerly 
Miss Ida Booz, of Glenside, Pa. 

William Fellman & Co., oculists and op- 
ticians, Philadelphia, Pa., have moved 
from 6 N. 13th St. to 1029 Chestnut St., 
where they have opened a handsome and 
ela,borately equipped optical store. The 
branch store on N. Front St. will be con- 
ducted by them as hitherto. This enter- 
prising young firm have within the past 
few years built up a lucrative trade. 

The wife of T. Haines Moore, optician. 
Ridge Ave. and Spring Garden St., Phila- 
delphia, Pa., died suddenly last Friday, un- 
der circumstances so unusual that a public 
inquest had to be held to determine the 
cause of death. It was then established 
that Mrs. Moore got bottles containing 
carbolic acid and whiskey confused, after 
returning home from a ball with her hus- 
band, late Friday, and drank the poison in 
mistake for whiskey. The dose was a fatal 
one, and she died a few hours later. Mr. 
Moore is indignant at the statements, 
given much publicity, that his wife com- 
mitted suicide after a quarrel with him. 
and all doubt as to the exact cause of 
death was removed by Mr. Moore’s 
testimony at the inquest. Mr. Moore 
is widely known to the trade in Phil- 
adelphia and was formerly with Queen 
& Co. He is a brother-in-law of Harrison 
Crapp, in charge of the optical depart- 


CHICAGO COLLEGE OF OPTICS. 

TECHNICAL AND PRACTICAL 
TRAINING SCHOOL FOR 
REFRACTING OPTICIANS. 

Average term of attendance four weeks? but 
course not limited in time. 

Write for prospectus. 


College Rooms and Dioptric Clinic, 

Suite 21, 69 Dearborn Street. 

QEO. A. ROGERS, Principal. 


DR. KNOWLES' 

PRIVATE COURSE IN 

Optometry. 

SPECIAL RATES IN THE 
CORRESPONDENCE DEPARTMENT. 

“EYE DEFECTS,” 

A. Nte'W Oook, in clotli, F*rice, .^1.00. 
For terms and important particulars, write to 

R. H. KNOWLES, M. D., 

541 Fulton 5t,, Brooklyn, N, Y, 



Warner &SWASEY 

PRISM 

FIELD GLASSES. 


POWERFUL AS A TELESCOPE. 
SMALL AS AN OPERA GLASS. 


POWEK EIGHT. ONE-THIKD SIZE. 

“UNIVERSAL." 

PRICE, $45.00. 


Send for igoi Booklet. 

THE WARNER & SWASEY CO. 

CLEVELAND, OHIO. 



POWER EIGHT. ONE-THIRD SIZE. 

"individual." 

PRICE, $40.00. 



56 


February 13, 1901. 


THE JEWELERS’ CIRCULAR-WEEKLY. 


Optical Department. 

[C'-rf -'T- 53 

; , , , : ; ; Sncilenluirg's <ti>re. He has been 

iwieed married. 

H. B. \'inin^. optician. Kansas City, 
Mo., has been on the sick list. 

Fred Lancti't. jeweler. .\da. Minn., is 
taking a correspondence school course in 
optics. 

J. C. Gil-son. optician, was at G. F. 
Barr's jewelrv store. Huntington. X. Y., 
Feb. 1-2. 

H. Wade, optician. Swanton, \'t., is 
nioGng to more spacious quarters in the 
Farrell block. 

B. H. Blank, traveler for Hammel, 
Riglander & Co.. Xew York, called on 
the Kansas City, Mo., optical trade last 
week. 

C. X. Sheldon, traveler for the Merry 
Optical Co.. Kansas City. Mo., has just 
returned from a western trip and reports 
a good trade. 

Elwood Riggs, manager of the Kansas 
City, Mo., branch of the Columbian Op- 
tical Co., is in Topeka, Kan., on a short 
business trip. 

Mr. Edmondson, optician, is now at 
J. M. Bigwood’s jewelry store, 607 Wabash 
,\ve., Terre Haute, Ind.. and will remain 
all this month. 

Fred. C. Merry, of the Merry Optical 
Co., Kansas City, Mo., has gone on a 
three weeks' business trip. He will visit 
Chicago. Xew York and Southbridge, 
Mass. 

G. F. .\pplegate, of the Sun Optical 
Mfg. Co., Trenton, Mo., is taking a course 
of study at the Institute of Mechano- 
Xeural Therapy, X. Clinton .\ve., that 
city. 

The engagement is announced of Abe 
Isaacs, of the Pacific Optical Co., 343 
Kearny St., San Francisco, Cal., and Miss 
Fannie Marks, with Davis, Schonwasser 
& Co. 

G. W. Pierce, secretary of the Bay State 
Optical Co., .\ttleboro. Mass., was in San 
Francisco, Cal., last week, on his annual 
trip. Mr. Pierce has found business in 
that section very good. 

The Globe Optical Co.. 93 Yonge St., 
Toronto, Ont., are giving up business and 
will dissolve partnership. They have an- 
nounced a sale at greatly reduced figures 
tii close out the entire stock. 

Mr. Sargent, optician, Hartford, Conn., 
war married a o-w days ago at Fort Plain. 
The bride is the daughter of Mr. and Mrs. 
Joseph Failing, of that place. This is Mr. 
Sargent’r fourth venture in the matri- 
monial line. 

Herman E. Bonschur, optician, 1533 
Chestnut St., Philadelphia, Pa., must move 
back the front of hi: 4ore building about 
a for-t, according to a legal building line 
fixed by Judge Pennypacker, after conrid- 
-rable litigation. 

S. G. .Slarshutz, Lo , .Angeles, Cal., left on 
Jan. 22 for a two month-.’ trip to Xew York, 
where he will establish a new wholesale 
importing house. He will handle prin- 
cipally all kind-, of thermometers, baro- 
meters and large optical instruments. 

The Standard rjptical Co., 217 Kearny 
St., San Francisco,, Cal., are working day 
and night filling orders from their trav- 


elers, who are covering the territory from 
Victoria to Mexico and from Ogden to 
the Pacific. Their sales are far ahead of 
last year. 

Under a recent decision of the Com- 
missioner of Customs of Western .Aus- 
tralia. spectacles with gold frames and 
with or without glasses are classified as 
opticians’ .goods, and are assessed with 
duty at the rate of 19 per cent, ad va- 
lorem. 

J. C. Huteson & Co.. Omaha, Xeb., are 
desirous of securing larger store facili- 
ties. as their business has outgrown their 
present quarters, but unfortunately they 
have a lease on their building for a year 
to come. If they could sub-lease it they 
would move at once. 

John -A. Perkins, manager of the Win- 
chester Optical Co., Winsted, Conn., says 
of the state of business: “We have been 
very busy during the year past, but it is 
naturally quiet at this time. Orders are 
coming in now, however, and I think we 
shall have a good year.” 

Dan B. Cavanough, manager and buyer 
for the optical department of the Doggett 
Dry Goods Co., Kansas City, AIo., has 
just returned from Xew York. He visited 
Philadelphia and other eastern cities, re- 
turning via St. Louis, his health being 
much benefited by his trip. 

C. W. Wingate, jeweler and optician, 
16 Bromfield St., Boston, AUss., is clos- 
ing out his stock at auction. This was 
made necessary through the failure of a 
firm which occupied half of the premises. 
Mr. Wingate is undecided as to whether 
he will remain in his present quarters or 
seek new ones. 

J. T. Gallagher, Knobnoster. Mo.; Sam 
Allen, Shawnee, Okla. ; August Schlicker, 
Vinita, Ind. Ter.; C. E. A'^^an Voorhis, of 
the Van Voorhis Jewelry Co., Yates 
Center, Kan.; C. C. Stevenson, Pittsburg, 
Kan., and Frank Wuerth, Leavenworth, 
Kan., called upon the Kansas City, Mo., 
opticians last week. 

Fred Huber, who has conducted the 
business of the Fidel Huber jewelry store, 
Dillon, Mont., left last week for Xew 
A^ork, where he will take a course in op- 
tics. Air. Goldsmith will now conduct 
the jewelry business of the Fidel Huber 
store. Air. Huber will return in Alay, 
when he will take a position with his 
brother. 

The following are studying optics un- 
der Dr. S. W. Lane, of the Southwestern 
Optical College, Kansas City, Mo.: 
Charles E. Van Voorhis, Yates Center, 
Kan.; Roy E. .Allen, Shawnee, Okla.; 
Frank W. Swearingen, Topeka, Kan.; Jas. 
F. Barr, Stockton, Alo. ; A. J. Godfrey, 
Alarceline, Alo., and John May Rose, 
Chicago, who is there taking a post- 
graduate course. 

The insolvent business of the Canadian 
Camera and Optical Co., Toronto, Ont., 
was sold on the 6th, under an order of 
the Court, and was purchased by F. H. 
Hallford, of Hamilton, at 35} cents on 
the dollar. The nominal assets of the 
company are $17,(K»0, and it is thought 
that the creditors may realize 20 cents on 
the dollar. The business may be contin- 
ued by Air. Hallford. 

The store and workroom of Frank AI. 


Silva, optician, were damaged to the ex- 
tent of between $200 and $300 in a fire 
which occurred in the building at 207 
Westminster St., Providence, R. L, Wed- 
nesday evening. Air. Silva had only re- 
turned to his shop, Wednesday, after an 
illness of five weeks’ duration, during 
which time his shop had remained closed. 
The fire originated in the basement and 
practically wrecked the building. 

The opticians of Tennessee have formed 
a temporary association, with the follow- 
ing officers: President, H. W. Liggette, 

Alemphis, Tenn.; vice-president, L. T. Lit- 
tle, Union City, Tenn.; secretary, E. B. 
Aleyer, 341 Alain St., Alemphis, Tenn.; 
treasurer. Prof. H. Lauffer, Alemphis, 
Tenn.; executive committee, H. J. Cook, 
Knoxville, Tenn.; A. H. Wenning, Nash- 
ville, Tenn.; G. R. Calhoun, Xashville, 
Tenn. 

The new catalogue of Oskamp, Xolting 
& Co., Cincinnati, O., is in press and will 
be out by the first of Alarch. It repre- 
sents a full line of optical supplies, and 
includes all kinds of opera, field and other 
glasses and compasses. It is fully illus- 
trated and shows what a complete line 
they carry. If you do not receive a copy 
next month write for it. Harr>- Emrie 
is in charge of this department of this 
firm and has made the catalogue a special 
study for months. 

The Optical Society of the City of New 
A'ork will hold their regular monthly 
meeting in Parlor D R, Fifth Avenue 
Hotel, this evening, at 8.30 o’clock. Prof. 
William Fox will deliver a lecture on a 
subject of scientific optical interest. The 
society will also consider the following 
motion: 

“That a prize of $5 be awarded to the member 
writing the best original article upon any subject 
of optical interest, either scientific or practical, the 
article to be of reasonable length and to be handed 
in for reading.” 

Prospects of the Sale of the Alvan Clark 
Telescope Works. 

Boston, Alass., Feb. 8. — If is said that 
the prospects are good for the sale of 
the old Alvan Clark telescope works on 
Brookline St., Cambridgeport. The plan 
is to form a stock company, purchase the 
works, etc., modernize them where such 
is needed, and carry on the business in a 
manner which will be a great improvement 
on the present state of affairs. These are 
the works started by the late Alvan Clark, 
the world-famous telescope maker. The 
Lick, A'erkes and many smaller instru- 
ments were made at this factorj'. When 
Air. Clark died, his son Alvan G. Clark 
took up the business, and it was nearly 
as successful as when his father was in 
charge. 

On the death of the son the business 
passed into the hands of Richard H. 
Grogan, Jr., his son-in-law. The latter 
carried on the works for about six months, 
and was just getting the affairs well under 
way, when he met his death, July 4, at 
the hands of his brother-in-law, Charles 
R. Eastman. Since that date Carl A. R. 
Lundin, the veteran manager, who has 
been at the works for about 26 years, has 
continued the business for Airs. Grogan. 
The future of the business was very' un- 
certain until the present plan appeared on 
the horizon. 


February 13, 1901. 


THE JEWELERS’ CIRCULAR-WEEKLY. 


57 



JACOT MUSIC BOX CO., 


Jewelers’ Court, 

(E. D. GARNSEY, Owner), 

51 & 53 MAIDEN LANE, • ■ NEW YORK. 

Ready for occupancy April 1st, 1901. 


This modern, twelve-story, absolutel) 
fireproof business building will have solid 
masonry floors, solid plaster partitions, 
high marble wainscotings, three high-speed 
elevators, mail chute, basins in all offices, 
electric light and everything that con- 
tributes to comfort and convenience. 

Offices of all sizes are provided and 
floors may be leased entire or in part, par- 
titioned to suit tenants. Those desiring to 
carry on light manufacturing can be ac- 
commodated, special provision being made 
for adequate power. Drop hammers will 
be located in the basement. 

Floor plans are now ready for inspection and 
leases can be arranged by communicating with 

VOORHEES & FLOYD, 

56 Liberty Street, New York. 



and 

beware of 
imitations. 


'True Blue 

Beaded Label 

French 
H^tcb 
Glass 


Ask your jobber for 
this label — 


Wholesale Agents 

NEW YORK : 37 Maiden Lane. 
PARIS: 21 Rue de I’Echiquier. 


Ask Your 
Jobber 
For Them 


SUSSFELD, 

Lorsch & Co. 


% 

'*r 

Ttr 

Hr 

Hr 

Hr 

4- 

4- 

4- 

Hr 

Hr 

Hr 

X 

Hr 

Hr 


X 

Hr 

Hr 


JULES JURQENSEN, 

Plain and Complicated 

Watches and Chronometers 

HAVE RECEIVED THE 

HIGHEST “POSSIBLE” AWARD, 

Paris- “The Grand Prix ’’-1900 

Sole Agents, SCHILZ & RIDOLPH, 

28 John Street and 65 Nassau Street, new YORK. 


-k 

■k 

X 

■k 

-k 

-k 

-k 


-k 

-k 

-k 

X 

-k 

-k 

-k 

■k 

-k 

-k 

-k 

-k 

-k 

-k 

■k 

-k 

-k 

■k 




IMPORTERS, 

Stella and Ideal Music Boxes, 

39 UNION SOUARE. N. Y. 


wn. SMITH & CO., 


GILL BLDG., 9*13 MAIDEN LANE, N.Y. 
61 PECK ST., PROVIDENCE, R. I. 


KUUUU 

iat4 



laliysl4rKCascs, 

WARRANTED 25 YEARS, 

I have Solid Gold Bows and Joints. 
Hand Engraved. 


Qold, Silver and [(oiled Plate Chains and Jewelry. 

Nonrelties iu Gold and Silrar Bracelets. Also a lar^e line of Chain Trimminca. 


I4K. COLD PENS AND FOUNTAIN PENS 

SEND FOR 
ILLUSTRATED 
PRICE-LISTS. 



DON’T FORGET THE JEWELERS’ CIRCULAR PUB- 
LISHING CO.’S BOOK LIST when In want of any techni- 
cal work in the Jewelry or Kindred Trades. 


AND STYLOGRAPHIC PENS FOR EXPORT. 
DIAMOND POINT PEN CO., 102 J Beekman Street, N. Y., U.S.A. 



February 13, IDOl. 


5S 


THE JEWELERS’ CIRCULAR-WEEKLY. 


BUYERS’ INFORMATION BUREAU. 

Oucstions as to the makers of certain lines of goods, where to buy certain lines, where certain kinds 
of work are done, the owners of certain trade-marks and other matters relating to the buying branch of 
a ieweiry business will be cheerfully answered under this department. The reader cannot ask too many 
questions. r ,-s recciz cd arr aLso answered promptly by mail. 


H.smilton. Ont.. Jan. 29. IWl. 
Editor .f The Jew elers' Circul.sr-\\ eekly : 

W '-.r, I you kindly give us the address of some 
t lamif., . turer.s of electric time clocks suitable for 
'..'ge ;,.etories. with -'eotric bells ciimmunicating 
l!om different departments t.i clock in main office, 
tc .oct ,LS ,j regular watchman's clock. And oblige. 

Yours very truly. 

I..sMPM.\N Bros. 

.\\sw' k- — Self - W inding Clock Co.. 
Grand and DeKalb .\ves., Brooklyn, X. 
V.: E. H-Mvard Clock Co.. 4'io W'^ashing- 
ton St.. Boston. Mass.; Johnson Electric 
Service Co.. Milwaukee. W'is. ; Standard 
Electric Time Co.. W’aterbury. Conn. 


Champaig.v. 111., Dec. 6. 1900. 
e.: f The Jewelers' Circvlar-U eeklv : 

Please let us know where we may have an old 
;-loom. pearl carved fan, repaired. It has 
delicately carved sticks and should require very 
careful work upon same. Thanking you in ad- 
v.nce for your kindness and trouble. 

\'ery truly, 

Jewelry. 

.\n9wer: — C. Levielle, 51 W’. 19th St., 
Xew York, makes a specialty of repairing 
fine fans. He will, undoubtedly, be able to 
fix the one correspondents have. 

New York, Jan. 7. 1901. 
Editor of The Jewelers' Circular-W eekly : 

Your paper, to which my employer is a sub- 
scriber for a number of years, contains a de- 
partment about watches and clocks. 1 would like 
to buy a book containing illustrations of all fa- 


mous clocks and Would, therefore, ask you if 
such a work e.xists and where I could buy a copy 
of lit. I think -that you are in a position to give 
me the desired information and you would greatly 
oblige me by sending same to 
Yours truly, 

I. Adelsberger. 

.-Vxswek: — Perhaps the best work of the 
character specified is “'Old Clocks and 
Watches and Their Makers.” by F. J. 
Britten. For sale by Charles Scribner's 
Sons. 153-7 Fifth Ave.. Xew York. 


.Maysville. Ky.. Jan. 29, 1901. 
Editor of The Jewelers’ Circular-\\ eekly; 

.Maysville Commandery, Xo. 10. are in the mar- 
ket for .700 to 1.000 souvenir badges, special de- 
sign. in metal, to be used at the Triennial Con- 
clave next August. Will you kindly give me the 
address of some people who do that class of 
work, and oblige. 

G. A. McCarthey. 

Answer: — W'e refer correspondent i;o 
X. Stafford, 60 Fulton St.. Xew York, 
.who. we think, can supply him with wh.at 
he wants. 

Lincoln. X'eb., Jan. 13, 1901. 
Editor of The Jewelers' Circular-Weekly: 

Can you give me the address of the differen’ 
importers of cut beads, etc. : also importers of 
filigree jewelry made up? .-\nd oblige, 

7'ours respectfully, 

C. E. Myers. 

Answer; — For cut beads we refer cor 
respondent to A. dc H. Veith, 719 Broad- 
waj'. Xew York. For importers of filigree 


jewelry to I. Emrich & Co., 42 E. 14th 
St.. Xew York, and for American manu- 
facturer of filigree jewelry. Peter Hart- 
mann, 3(i Maiden Lane, Xew York. 


Patent Time Indicator. 


S .UIUEL P. THRASHER, Xew 
Haven, Conn., has arrived home 
from a two months’ business trip to 
England. where he has established 
headquarters for the manufacture and sale 
of his patented time indicator. He has 
interested English capital in the com- 
pany and clocks are now being manufac- 
tured. Later he will form a company in 
this country and will begin the manufac- 
ture of clocks in Xew Haven. The busi- 
nes.-. e“;tabli.shed in England will in no way 
conflict with the inventor's American 
rights. At the English headquarters of 
the company an exhibit is being prepared 
for the Glasgow Exposition which opens 
next Spring. Mr. Thrasher will probably 
return to England to take charge of the 
exhibition in May. 


An eight-cay clock that has run con- 
tinuously for 52 years is owned by William 
Rishel. of Jefferson township. Berks 
county. Pa. 

A dispatch from Essex. Conn., stated 
that a watch believed to have been lost 
some time about 1627 has been found on 
Poverty Island. The outside of the watch 
appears to have been engraved. On the in- 
side of the outer case is engraved a name, 
which cannot be made out. and the date. 
1627. 


THE lIMPROVED CABINET WALL CASE... 



lAtting: door entirely concea-ieel. 
insuring; maximum space 
of display and beauty 
in design. 

PATENT PENDING. 

John A. Bank & Bro., 

Cabinet makers in 
Tine Tixtnres, etc., 

334-336 East 23d Sf., NEW YORK . 


OUR LINE OF 

NEW AND SALABLE DESIGNS IN 

Gold Rings, Brooches, Studs, Scarf Pins, 
Stick Pins, Screw Ear Drops, Heart 
Charms, Baby Pins and Eye-Glass Chains 
i is ready for your inspection. 

E. L. SPENCER & CO., 

53 Aborn Street, 

PROVIDENCE, R 


New York Office : 

9-11-13 Maiden Lane. 



ERNEST VATIER, 


FOUNDER IN 

Gold, Silver 

and 

Bronze d’Art. 

Maker of 

FINE CASTINGS 

For Silversmiths and Jewelers. 
Specialty of Solid Gold Cast 
Rings, Charms, Scarf Pins. etc. 


312 MARKET STREET, NEWARK, N.J. 

Bell Telephone. No. 6542. 


KLEIN BROTHERS, 

Diamond Setters, Engravers 

AND CHASERS. 

Q-lj Maiden Lane, Room 130s, New York. 


THE ATTLEBORO CHAIN CO. 

mantjYacturers of an 

Improved Machine Chain, 

ATTLEBORO, MASS. 


DON’T FORGET THE JEWELERS’ CIRCULAR PUG 
LISHING OO.’S BOOK LIST when In want of 
nical work In tha Jewelry or Kindred Tradot. 


February 13, 1901. 


THE JEWELERS’ CIRCULAR-WEEKLY. 


59 


M ERCANTILE f OlNTAIN P ENS. 


NONE 

BETTER! 



AIKIN, LAMBERT & CO., 


Manufacturers and Exporters, 

GOLD PENS, PENCILS, Etc. 


19 Maiden Lane, New York. General Agents for PAUi E. WIRT’S fountain pens. 


/\|KIKI-LAMBERT 
JEWELRY CO. 


JOBBERS IN 


Watches, Jewelry, 

Chains, Novelties, &c. 


LATEST DESIGNS. 


LOWEST PRICES. 


19 MAIDEN LANE, NEW YORK. 


IMPORTERS OF 

Diamonds 






. .THE . . 

SWAN FOUNTAI N PEN. 

Reputation World Wide. 

Made upon Distinct Principles. 

Is a Compressed Air Pump. 
Simply Wet the Insides to Provoke 
an Energy. 


W. W. STEWART, Inventor and Patentee. 

A variety of Styles and Prices. 
3 Sizes Safety Swans. 

3 Sizes Self=filling Swans. 

2 Sizes Adjustable Feed Swans. 

MABIE,TODD & BARD, 

NEW YORK, CHICAGO AND LONDON. 


KETCHAM & McDOUQALL, 


Rings 


WM. LOEB&GO. 

101 Sabin St, 
Providence, R. I. 



UANUFACTURERS OF 

GOLD AND SILVER 

THIMBLES 

maTAmusHEo ia92. 


MID 


TRADE-MARK. 



Fat’d N.t. *0. tL 




SEND FOR 
CATALOGUE O. 


And the improved 

Aotomatte Eye-Glass Reel. 

37 HAIDEN LANE. NEW YORK 


Established 1879. 


Manufacturer of 


LOUIS w. HRABA, (i Tine Ceatber Goods, 


I 


29 East 19tll St., New York. Exclusively for the Jewelry Trade. ^ 


WATCHES OF PRECISION. 



Mathey Bros., Mathez & Co. 

Manufacturers and Importers of 

Superior, Plain and Complicated Watches. 

Sole Agents for 

CHAS. H. MEYLAN. 


V9ATCHES DEMAGNETIZED. 


to SIZE MOVEMENTS. 


SMALL WATCHES A SPECIALTY. 

Brassus, Switzerland. 21 MAIDEN LANE, NEW YORK. 



10 SIZE SPLITS. 




60 


THE JEWELERS’ CIRCULAR-WEEKLY. 


February 13. 1001. 








OUR IMPORT SAMPLES 


..OF.. 


CMna. 6la$$ and Brlc-a-Brac, 

ESPECIALLY SELECTED FOR THE FINE JEWELRY TRADE, 

ARE NOW READY. 


Tn Ctitiogcs China, 


from our own factory, we call special attention to 
the large variety of 


Tine Plates and Cups and Saucers, 


in original and artistic shapes and decorations. 


Trom Our factory at Carlsbad 


we have received many interesting novelties, par- 
ticularly reproductions of the Old Dresden and 
Vienna Styles. 


Our display of 

Taney China and Pottery 


comprises collections from only the best and most 
noted factories of Europe. 


We make a specialty of 


Taney and Cable Classtpare 


in great variety. 


Charles Ahrenfeldt & 5on, 


50=52-54 MURRAY STREET, NEW YORK. 


PARIS. 


LIMOGES. 


CARLSBAD. 


LEIPZIG. 


?T 

i4» 

if 

if 

if 

if 

if 

if 

i 

i 

*i 

;X 

if 

li 

if 

if 

if 

i ^I» 


It 

it 

if 

It 

tT 

If 

• cN « 

if 

'I 

IT 

rT 

? J, 

if 

if 

if 

I# 

it 

s* 

ij 

if 

■T 

• i 

iT 

if 

ST 




LONDON, i 4. 

if 





THE RAMBLER^S NOTES. 


WHAT THE RAMBLER SAW AND HEARD AMONG THE 
DEALERS IN ART POTTERY. CUT GLASS, 
BRONZES. ETC. 


^ DORFLINGER 

OPENING NEW LINE OF W. & SONS, 36 
CUT GLASS WARE. JVIurray St., N e w 
York, are preparing 
now for the opening of an attractive new 
line of cut glass ware some time next week. 
Several novelties will be shown. General 
business is reported good, with orders for 
the lines at present in stock coming in 
with pleasing regularity. 

* 

A UNIQUE Line of 
clocks and jew- 
cLocKs AND FRAMES, elcd framcs for pho- 
tographs is to be 
seen on the tables and counters of Sydney 
J. Manby, 30 E. 29th St., New York. There 
are high class novelties in art goods, and 
pieces of odd shapes, as well as bronzes 
and antiques such as the jewelry trade can 
handle to advantage, in addition to the 
usual assortment of fancy goods of recent 
importation. 

* 

Y^ICKE & CO., 
A LINE OF MUCH V T 32 Park Place, 
INTEREST TO JEWELERS. New York, are dis- 
playing a line of cut 
glass of much interest to those who are 
constantly on the lookout for things that 
are new, useful and ornamental. Just at 
this time they are paying attention particu- 
larly to some attractive specimens of Tut- 
hill’s cut glass ware of rich design, ’which 
are considered of special importance to the 
jewelry trade. An assortment of 11 pieces 
has been assembled and is offered to the 
trade, including bon-bon and olive dishes 
I and a celery tray, that are unique in de- 
( sign. 

The Rambler. 


Art in Wrought Iron. 


A REM ARKABLEpiece of wrought iron 
art work from the Armbruster works, 
at Frankfort-on-the-Main, was put on ex- 
hibition at Tiffany's, Feb. 1, where it will 
probably remain until the weather permits 
of the laying a foundation for it upon the 
grounds of George Gould’s place, at Lake- 
wood, where it is to become a part of the 
ornamentation. A Prussian eagle attack- 
ing a dragon forms the group, which is 
entitled, “The Triumph of Enlightenment 
Over Ignorance.” At the Paris Exhibi- 
tion the group formed the centerpiece of 
|the German exhibit. 


Old Pottery from Egypt. 


T he Egyptian Gallery at the British 
Museum has, says the Sphere, just 
come into possession of the mummy of a 
man which may well be the oldest known 
body of any human being. The facts con- 
cerning it are briefly summed up in the 
following particulars; The grave was first 
seen by a wandering Arab; he reported 
his discovery to a British official, who im- 
mediately sent a couple of Egyptian sol- 
diers to guard it day and night until it 
could be safely removed. The body is not 
a mummy of the ordinary historic Egypt- 
ian period, such as that of Rameses II., 
the father of the Pharaoh of the Exodus. 
It was never bound up in linen or cased 
in any painted coffin, but was merely coat- 
ed with a preparation of bitumen, the 
-Arabic word for which is miimia; hence our 
word mummy. To reach the period when 
this man hunted along the banks of the 
Nile it is necessary to travel backwards in 
time through the modern period since 
Elizabeth, through mediaeval Europe, 
through the whole history of Rome and 
Greece, past the time of the earliest mum- 
mied king the museum possesses, past 
even Menes, the earliest king to which 
Egyptian records make reference, who, ac- 
cording to Mariette, ruled about 5004 
B. C. Then we are among two prehistoric 
races, one the conquerors and the other 
the conquered, out of which sprang the 
Egyptian race of the earliest dynasties. It 
is with these remote stocks that this man 
is connected. Considering the conditions 
in which he was found, it is evident that 
he was associated with a late period of the 
new stone age of Egypt. He is buried in 
a characteristically neolithic grave (the 
graves of this period are covered with rude 
slabs of stone), and has neolithic pots and 
flint implements beside him. They are 
like other neolithic pots and chipped flint 
weapons and knives found in other parts 
of the world. The fine, thin flint knives 
were perhaps placed in the grave as part 
of a funeral ritual. They should be com- 
pared with the Egyptian flints in the pre- 
historic section of the museum; they are 
almost identical with those found in the 
grave. There is, of course, no inscription 
of any kind on the pots, knives or grave, 
all having been made long before the in- 
vention of a written language. It is curi- 
ous to note that certain ancient Egyptian 
documents mention traditions of a race 
called the Trehennu, who had red hair and 
blue eyes. This man has distinctly auburn 
hair. He was buried on the western shore. 
In later times every Egyptian was buried 


on that side of the river, and Egyptian 
models of the death boats on which the 
body was ferried over the stream may be 
seen in the Egyptian Gallery. 


A Remarkable Work in Mexican Onyx. 

T he largest and most elaborate piece of 
onyx ever manufactured in Mexico 
is being made in the City of Mexico for 
Fairfax Cartwright, the charge d’affairs of 
Great Britain, in Mexico. It Is in the form 
of a mantelpiece and is intended by Mr. 
Cartwright for his ancestral home, Aynho 
Park, near Banbury, Oxfordshire, Eng. 
The general design of the mantelpiece is 
English renaissance. The work of manu- 
facturing this handsome ornament has 
been in progress for several months. The 
artist in charge of the carving is an Ital- 
ian, Francesco Laffi, with a young assist- 
ant, Dante Blaggi. The mechanical exe- 
cution is in charge of Pablo Aguiloche, a 
Spaniard, who has had many years’ ex- 
perience in the quarries of Carrara, Italy. 

The onyx is used in the white and green. 
The round pillars, on either side, are mon- 
olithic pieces of green onyx of a remark- 
ably delicate shade, and they stand out 
against a background of the white onyx. 
The cornice above the fireplace is elabo- 
rately carved in roses and garlands and is 
seven feet from end to end. Beneath it is 
an elaborately treated slab, with the Cart- 
wright coat of arms, also carved in onyx, 
in the center. Inside of the pillars and on 
either side of the fireplace are two panels 
in white Carrara marble. These panels are 
the only parts about the mantelpiece that 
are not of onyx, and they are of marble, 
because onyx would not stand the heat 
consequent on so close a proximity to the 
fire. The garlands and medallions with 
which the two Carrara marble panels were 
carved, were designed by Homdedeu, the 
Catalonian artist. The large space inside 
the fender will be laid with onyx tiles, 
which have been carefully selected and are 
of colors corresponding with the mantel- 
piece. 


Grapework is the vogue in Philadelphia, 
Pa. The artists of the Peter L. Krider 
Co. have just completed some beautiful ex- 
amples of hand carved vines, leaves and 
clusters of grapes, in half relief, on ster- 
ling, which are much admired. The pitch- 
ers, loving cups, punch bowls and center- 
pieces are attracting the attention of art 
critics. 


62 


THE JEWELERS’ CIRCULAR-WEEKLY. 


February 13, 1901. 


THE JEUELIiV EEl'AIEEli'S 
HAyDBOOK. 


Copyright by Thk JawELSKs' Circular Pub. Co., 1901. 


(Commenced in issue of Feb. 6, i^oi.) 

CHEMIC.\LS, TABLES AND RE- 
CIPES. 

T he following is a complete list of 
chemicals a jobbing jeweler will need. 
Tl»wr uses will be pointed out as we pro- 
ceed. 


Vf ( Grain 
.\lcohol or 

( Wood, 
-\mmonia. 


Gum mastic. 
Muriatic acid, 
Nitric acid. 
Sal-ammoniac, 


.\qua-regia (nitro-muriatic acid). 
Benzine, Saltpetre, 

Bi-carbonate of soda, Shellac, 


Sulphuric acid. 
Sulphate of iron, 
Sulphuret of potash. 
Soap, 

W'ashing soda. 


Boric acid. 

Calcium plaster, 

Canada balsam. 

Chloride of iron. 

Chloride of zinc, 

Chromic acid. 

Boric acid is used in the preparation of 
anti-oxidizer. 

Chromic acid is used for testing silver, 
If a drop of it be placed on sterling silver 
it will immediately change its color from 
a bright crimson to a dark red, while on 
silver less than coin it will become the 
color of chocolate. 


Muriatic acid is used in the preparation 
of soft-solder destroyer; for making aqua- 
regia, etc. 

Nitric acid is used for testing gold and 
silver; removing mercury from gold and 
silver and for making aqua-regia. 

Aqua-regia, which is an old name for 
nitro-muriatic acid, is composed of three 
parts of muriatic acid and one part of nitric 
acid. This acid or combination is used for 
dissolving gold and testing alloys of M 
karat or over. 

Sulphuric acid is used for making the 
pickle which is used for cleaning articles 
after they have been heated. 

It may be well to state here that should 
- anj- acid, by accident, fly into the eyes of 
the workman he should immediately rub 
soap and water into the parts affected. W'e 
I know this from experience to be an effi- 
cient antidote. 

I The uses of alcohol are so well known 
' to the trade that it is not necessary to state 
anything about it excepting that wood 
' alcohol, which is only one-half as expensive 
as grain alcohol, will answer just as well 
as the latter for the jewelry repairer’s use. 

.Ammonia should be bought pure and di- 
luted with four times its volume of water. 
This will be found satisfactory for washing 
jobs. 

Bi-carbonate of soda, or baking soda, 
is used for washing dirty and slightly tar- 
nished silver ware. 




It Will Pay. 






PLACE YOUR ORDERS NOW FOR NEXT 
FALL DELIVERY AND DON'T WAIT TO 
PURCHASE FROM STOCK. ^ ^ ^ 


IMPORT ORDERS A SPECIALTY. 


CHARLES L. DWENQER, 

Importer.... 35 Park Place, New York. 


A SPLENDID LINE OF 

JIrtistic Pottery, CDina and Glassware 

FOR THE JEWELRY TRADE. 


*. ♦ 4- -f 4- ♦ ♦ 4- ♦ -f -f -f 4- 4- -f ^ 


■♦4-444 4 44 4 444 


► 4- 
4 
4 
4 
4 
4 
4- 
4 
4 
4 
4 
4 
4 
4 
4 
4 
4 
4 
4 
4- 
4 
4 
4- 
4 
4 
4 
4 
4 
4 
4 
4 
4 
4 
4 
4 


FEBRUARY OFFERING. 


I 8-in. S,\I.AI» HOWI,. 

1 .SOL’AT CAKAFIK. 

1 .SI GAU. 

1 GKKA.M. 

1 8-ln. HOI «il KT. 

1 6-in. U.NHAJiOLKI) HON-IJON. 
1 12-in. CEI.KKV TKAY. 

1 7-in. OI.IVE, Fancy .Sliapc. 

1 7-ln. Jlifferent Sliapc. 

1 6-in. HAN'm.EIl J10N-I50N. 

1 5-in. UNHANDI.EI) UON-ItON'. 


\ 


II Pieces. 

32 Park Place, 

NEW YORK. 


/ 


'S 

Rich Gut 
Glass. 




This Assortment, Costing 

$ 25 , 

f. o. b. factory, 3 per cent. 10 days, 
no charge for package, enables 
you to investigate the newest 
styles in Cut Glass without any 
'risk whatever. 


WICKE & CO., 


32 Park Place, 

NEW YORK 


Benzine is used mainly for removing 
tripoli from work before using rouge. 

Canada balsam, which can be obtained 
in any drug store, is the cement dsed for 
cementing bifocal lenses. 

Calcium plaster, or jilaster of paris, is 
used for fastening tops on vinaigrettes, salt 
shakers, etc. 

Chloride of zinc dissolved in alcohol is 
used as a soft-soldering fluid. It can be 
purchased at any drug store. 

Chloride of iron is used for o.xidizing 
brass buckles. The chloride is dissolved 
in water and then boiled. While boiling, 
the buckle is immersed until the desired 
shade is obtained. Should a darker shade 
i)e wanted, dip the article into a liver-of- 
sulphiir solution. 

Gum mastic is the best cement we know 
of for cementing pearls on pegs. It comes 
in “tears” or balls and hardens very 
quickly. 

There are on the market jewelry soaps 
and washes of various descriptions, but 
for every-day use in the shop and store 
we prefer Ivory soap. It is smooth, does 
not scratch or cause the work to tarnish 
and is nice for cleaning the hands and 
face. 

Shellac is used principally for fastening 
braid in the metal ends, for guards. 

Sulphate of iron is used for precipitating 
gold held in solution and for making soft- 
solder destroyer. 

Saltpetre is used as a flux for refining 
purposes. 

' A piece of sal-ammoniac is the handiest 
thing for tinning a soft-soldering iron. 
Moisten the sal-ammoniac with the solder- 
i ing-fluid and then rub the heated iron and 
a piece of soft-solder over it. 
j Sulphuret of potash, or liver-of-sulphu: 
is used for oxidizing articles of silver. It 
should be kept tightly corked in a bottle 
I and can be used in either of two ways. 

Place a small piece in a boiling-cup and 
^ add some water, then slowly heat and im- 
' merse the article; or dissolve it in water 
and place it in a bottle to be used when 
wanted. 

Washing soda is very useful for remov 
I ing pickle from hollow goods. Place the 
articles in a bowl of warm water and add 
1 washing soda until all bubbling ceases. 

(To be continued.) 


IGNATZ MANN, 

45 John Street, - NBW YORK. 
MANUFACTURER OF THE 

Best Hand-Made 

Diamond Mountings. 

I LOWEST PRICES. 

E. H. Jackson, Fres. & Treas. A. D. Jackson, Mgi- 

JOHN J. JACKSON CO., 

MANUFACTURERS OP 

G01.D PI.A'TEO MEXAL 

For Watch Cases, Cane Heads, Pencil Cases, 

sterling Silver 

Government assay : silver bars, 999-KXK) fine. 

PI Mechanic Street. - - NEWARK. N. J. 

: WOOD & HUGHES, 

Sterling Silverware Manufacturers, 

I FINE PLATED WARE. 

1 No. 24 John Street, • New York 


February 13, 1901. 


THE JEWELERS’ CIRCULAR-WEEKLY, 


63 










SELLING IN LARGE QUANTITIES. 

“ It’s Simply Perfect,” writes Madame Bkrnhardt. 

This is indeed a remarkable tribute from the most remarkable lady in America. 



These bracelets are male of High-Grade Rolled Plate and Sterling Silver wire. Guaranteed to give the wearer satisfaction. 

We make a full line of “QualltV BCVOnd DUeStjOII ” n’ 

CjjAIN BRACELE.TS. yuaillj UCjfUIIU I^UCOIIUIIi Gold-Pilled and Sterling Silver. 

NEW YORK OFFICE, 
II John Street. 


TRAo. “Quality Beyond Question.” — 

PROVIDENCE STOCK CO., 


WE SELL THE 
WHOLESALE TRADE ONLY. 


100 to 106 Stewart Street, 
Providence, R.. I. 


CHICAGO OFFICE, 
131 Wabash Avenue. 















Established 1867. 

GEO. E. HOOPER, 


Jewelers’ Auctioneer, 


22 Hanover Street, also 
CASH PAID FOR Room 83, Jewelers’ Bui Idin 
%TocKs IN STonrs. BOSTON. 


r 


j T!1E BASSETT JEWELRY CO., \ 

I Fine Qold°Filled Chains, ■ 

T Lockets and Gold Jewelry, T 

I PROVIDENCE, R. I. T 

, .... d. 


i ^ 

i I ROLLED PLATED GDDDS I 

I ? OF EXTRA QUALITY. i 

I SILK-MOUNTED VESTS, FOBS, BUTTONS. \ 

• : 

i I Walter E. Hayward, Attleboro, Mass. I 








..0..O..O..O.. 


POCKET BOOKS, 

ALL STANDARD AND FASHIONABLE LEATHERS. 

Plain and Sterling Mounted. 


ESTABLISHED 

1850. 


C. F. RUMPP & SONS, j 

Fine Leather Goods. t 


? Fifth and Cherry Streets, 
PHILADELPHIA. 


NEW YORK SALESROOM, ? 


621 Broadway. 


SPECIAL LINES FOR FINE JEWELRY TRADE. 


CAST YOUR 

UPON AND INSPECT OUR NEW LINE OF 

PEARL PENDANT MOUNTINGS. 



49 MAIDEN LANE. 
NEW YORK. 


L. ADLER & SON. 


BLANCARD & CO., 

M.nufa„u..r. .f Scttiiigs, Gallerics, Etc., 

A reliable fox=tail chains. 

Send for Catalogue. 4.s & 4 7 JOHN ST., NEW YORK. 


i 



ALLEN « JONASSOHN, =r UIAMUNUS. 

HEW YORK. 65 NASSAU ST. PROVIDENCE, R. I., 212 UNION ST. PARIS, 58 HOE OE TURBIGO. Precious and Imitation Stones. 


R., L. & M. FRIEDLANDER, 

Wholesale Jewelers, 

Importers of Diamonds, 

30 Maiden Lane, NEW YORK CITY. 


L LELONG & BRO., 

Gold and Silver Refiners, Assayers and Sweep Smelters, 

S. W. Cor. Halsey and Marshall Sts., NEWARK, N. J. 

Prompt attention given to Gold and Silver Bullion. 

SMELTING FOR THE TRADE. 



Hall Clocks, 

Siiiott’s Celebrated 
Ijubutar Chimes. 

Harris & 
Harrington, 

32 & 34 VESEY ST., 
NEW YORK. 


Sole Agents to the Trade for 
J. J. ELLIOTT & CO., 
LONDON. 


LEO GOLDSMITH, 

Importer of Diamonds 
and Precious Stones, 

9-13 MAIDEN LANE, NEW YORK. 

RUBIES. 



ALtXAINUER H. REVELL & CO., 


431 to 437 FIFTH AVENUE, 
CHICAGO. 


253 BROADWAY, 


NEW YORK. 



We make a Patented ALL GLASS 
Counter Case. 

The latest and best in the market 


The latest imoro\ ed Dust-Tight 
C»unter Cnses. 


FIXTURES FITTED FOR 
ELECTRIC LIGHTING 

IF DESIRED. 

Give Us a 



Latest improved Dust-Tight Wall Cases and 
all kinds of .lewelers’ Fixture«. 



J LOUIS KAHN. MOSES KAHN. SAML. H. LEVY. 

I ^ 0O*. 

J Importers and Cutters of 

«- 

♦ 

4 

♦ NEW YORK; 172 Broadway. CUTTING WORKS: Cor. Beekman and Pearl SU. AMSTERDAM: 10 Tulp Straat. 


DIAMONDS. 


EstabUsbed ISss. Telephone, 1042. 

GOLD AND SILVER 
REFINER AND 
SWEEP SMELTER. 
Offlce-91 Page St. Works-77-85 Page St., 
PROVIDENCE, R. I. 


GEO. M. BAKER, 



HENRY E. OPPENHEIMER 
HENRY E. OPPENHEIMER 
HENRY E. OPPENHEIMER 
HENRY E. OPPENHEIMER 
HENRY E. OPPENHEIMER 


& CO., SAPPHIRES. 
& CO., SAPPHIRES. 
& CO., SAPPHIRES. 
& CO., SAPPHIRES. 
& CO., SAPPHIRES. 


We do all kinds of Refining, such as Sweeps, Sinks, 
Polishings, Ashes, Fluxes, Bobbing Sand, Solutions 
and anything containing Gold and Silver. 


Improved Seamless Wire Co., 

95 Pine St., Providence, R. I. 

Manufacturers of Seamless Gold-Filled Wire, Seamless Solid Gold and 
Silver Wire, Square and Fancy^ Wires, Seamless Tubing in Gold, Gold 
Plate, Silver and Brass. Flat Stock in all karats and qualities. 


ALBERT LORSCH. 


Telephone Call, 2142 John. 


ALFRED KROWER. 


•• 


LORSCH BUILDINQ, 37 and 39 MAIDEN LANE, NEW YORK. 167 WBYBOSSBT STREET, PROVIDENCE, R. I. 

DIAMONDS. ROSE DIAMONDS. 

PEARLS. OPALS. SAPPHIRES. RUBIES, EMERALDS, &c. 







ESTABLISHED 1869. INDEX TO ADVERTISEMENTS, PAGE 40. 



;2d Year. NEW YORK, WEDNESDAY. FEBRUARY 20, 1901. Vol. XLII. No. 3. 


UNIQUE AND INTERESTING SPECIMEN OP GOLD MOUNTING. 


pWO views are here presented of an in- 
* teresting piece of work, interesting not 
nly because of its construction, but also 
ecause of its importance in connection with 
ublic affairs. The article is a ballot box 
nd was made by Shreve & Co., San Fran- 
isco, Cal., upon the order of the Repub- 
can State Committee of California, and 


edge glass, resting upon a base of dark red- 
wood burl. Rising from each of the four 
corners is a column of manzanita, with 
base and capital of gold, heavily chased. 
Resting upon these columns is the top — a 
combination of California buckeye, madrone 
and manzanita — the upper part opening as 
a lid. hinged and fastened with a gold ! 


Davis, Christian B. Rode, Frank McGowan, 
Warren R. Porter, James McFadden.” On 
one side is a gold shield, engraved : “Presi- 
dent William McKinley, of Ohio.” On the 
other side is a gold shield, engraved : “Vice- 
President Theodore Roosevelt, of New 
■ York.” On the front edge of the cover is 
I a gold band, with the inscription : “Repub- 



30LD MOUNTED BALLOT BOX IN WHICH THE PRESIDENTIAL ELECTORS OF THE STATE OF CALIFORNIA DEPOSITED THEIR VOTES. 


as used Jan. 14 to receive the ballots cast 
y the electors of the State of California 
)r William McKinley as President and 
heodore Roosevelt as Vice-President, 
he box will be presented to President Mc- 
Inley. 

1 he box is 8x8 inches square, and was 
^signed and manufactured by Shreve & 
o., being constructed of California woods, 
lounted with 14-karat gold. The box 
.'oper is formed by four panels of beveled 


padlock, the key of which is secured by a 
chain. On the front face of the base is 
placed, in gold, the Great Seal ol the State 
of California, on either side of which is an 
American flag in 14-karat gold enameled in 
colors, entwined with gold laurel leaves in 
relief. On the back of the base is a gold 
shield, inscribed : “Presented to Hon. Wil- 
liam McKinley, by the Electors, Samuel M. 
Shortridge, William J. Barrett, John W. 
Ryan, Harold T. Power, VvTLiam R. 


lican Majority. November 6th, 1900,39,770.” 
On the back edge of the cover is a gold 
band, engraved : “Ballot Box, Presidential 
Electors of California, January 14th, 1901.” 
The whole is contained in a rich morocco 
case, the bottom of which, when the cover 
is removed, serves as a pedestal. 

Some of the new silver is not burnished, 
but finished with a soft, dull whitish lus- 
ter, recalling the natural hue of the metal. 




THE JEWELERS’ CIRCULAR-WEEKLY. 




Februarj" liJUl. 




Theodore W. Foster & Bro. Co. 

HAVE BEEN MAKERS OF ROLLED-GOLD PLATED JEWELRY FOR THIRTY 
YEARS, AND EACH YEAR, HAVE ADDED TO THEIR 
HIGH REPUTATION. 

VEST CHAINS FOR GENTLEMEN 

made by them will wear ten years and are so guaranteed See the F & B Trade-Mark. 

LOCKETS and CHARMS 

from their factory have a reputation equaled by no others. Order some of their latest 
patterns to tone up your stock. They are beautiful beyond description. They bear the 
F & B Trade-Mark. 

SLEEVE BUTTONS 

in the Dumbbell variety are exquisite. Be sure to see them; better still, order some. 
You will sell them quick. Look for the F & B Trade-Mark. 

Fob Chains and Charms, Silk Vests, Hair Chain Mountings, Brooches, Pins Trade- 


and Earrings are made by them; also seven complete lines of Sterling Silver 
Toilet and Manicure goods, and useful Sterling Novelties. 


Mark. 


SUCCESSORS TO 
FOSTER & BAILEY. 


100 Richmond St., Providence, R. I, 






“ B. A.” Gold Shell Collar Buttons 

are guaranteed as follows: “We will 

replace every ‘ B. A.’ button which for 
any reason proves unsatisfactory.” This 
guarantee is on the back of 
each card and our trade-mark 
embossed on the front. 


w 


SHELL. 

REQISTBRED. 


B. A. BALLOU & CO., 

Providence, R. I. 


HENRY REINEWALD, 

pineWatch Repairing 

TO THE TRADE, 

14 Maiden Lane, - New York. 

SKILLFUL REPAIRER. 

All kinds of jewelry repairing for the trade 
at satisfactory prices. 

New mountings, resetting, also new order work 
promptly attended to. A specialty made of Badges, 
Medals, etc. Twenty-five years’ experience. 

C. PONZONI, 16 Maiden Lane,NewYorh. 

Horological Department, 

BRADLEY POLYTECHNIC INSTITUTE, 

PEORIA, ILLINOIS. 

Largest and Best Watch Seliool in America. 

We teach Watch Work, Jewelry, Engraving, Clock Work, 
Optics. (Formerly Parsons’ Horological Institute.) 

Tnition reasonable. Board and rooms near school at moder* 
ate rales, Cataloiru^ Information. 

KENT & WOODLAND, 


SUCCESSORS TO 

WM. H. BALL & CO., 


lakers 

of 


GOLD BRACELETS 






ALOIS KOHN & CO., 

^ 4 MAIDEN LANE, Near Broadway, N, Ys 

We call the attention of the Trade throughout th^' country to our line of 

LORGNETTE AND GUARD CHAINS. 

Will send Samples on Memorandum on receipt of satisfactory reference. Correspondence 

Solicited. 


16 John Street, New York. 

FRESH WATER PEARLS 

BOIJGHX AIV D SOLD. 

Also PEARLS POLISHED 

and all possible improTements made. 
Pearls damaged by setting restored. 

JOHN HAACK,f,"rA..N„v,*. 

Office Hours : 1 to 3. 


February 20, 1901. 


THE JEWELERS’ CIRCULAR-WEEKLY. 


3 




»♦ 

♦ 

♦ 


II 


li 


Lancaster Watch Material 


It is a fact that we are in a better position to furnish 
the watchmaker more promptly than any other jobber in 
the United States with the following material: Lancaster, 
Aurora and Hamilton. We are right at the seat of opera- 
tion. We have the largest and only stock of Lancaster 
watch material in America. We can fill your order for 

Waltham, Elgin, Hampden, New England, Colum= 
bus, Illinois, Rockford, Seth Thomas, Howard, 

Century, Trenton, New York Standard and Swiss 

as quickly as any house in this country. 

We Never Sell Imitation Ntaterial for Genuine. 

We have a special made balance staff and a special 
mounted hole jewel. We can furnish you with these bal- 
ance staffs for all of the above-named watches for $18.00 
per gross. Every mounted jewel is cemented and trued 
and we sell them for $7.50 to $12.00 per gross, less 
10 per cent, for cash. 

Give us a trial at your mail business and we will dem- 
onstrate our promptness. 


t 

♦ 

♦ 

♦ 

I 

♦ 

♦ 

♦ 

♦ 

t 

♦ 

: 

♦ 


♦ 

X 

X 

♦ 

t 

I 

I 

I 


♦ 

X 

X 

♦ 

t 


I 


L. C. REISNER & CO., 

Importers, Exporters, Manufacturers and Jobbers, 
Watchmakers’ Tools, Material and Supplies, 

11 W. Chestnut St., Lancaster, Pa. Ill S. Eighth St., Phila., Pa. 














♦ 

X 

♦ 

: 

♦ 

♦ 

♦ 

♦ 

♦ 

♦ 

♦ 

♦ 

♦ 

I 


4 


THE JEWELERS’ CIRCUL AR-WEEKLY, 


February 20, 1901. 


"RJiigs. 


Best Enamel ImitationTurquoise \ 
Stones in lOK. Rings. 


No. 905, $1.50. No. 906, $2.00. No. 907, $3.00. No. 908, $3.50. No. 909, $4.00. 


Doublet or Imitation turquoise Stones. 

These rings are struck out by steel dies and are made the 
same way as we make our Tiffany mountings. 

Alt other such rings, when sold at near our prices, are only 
cast rings. 



No. 910, $3.74. No. 91 1. $5.20. No. 9 12, $5.20. No. 9 1 3, $5.34. No. 9 1 4, $6.00. | 


These prices are list and subject to our regular book 
discount. 

We show these rings as samples, to let you see what we can ' 
do in this kind of rings. 1 

They are taken from our igoi book, which will be ready 
around March loth. 


Plain Solid Gold Rings, Ladies* Stone Rings , 

Lngraved Rings, Mountings, 



Men’s Gypsy 10k. Rings, 
$1.60 per dwt. 


Chains. 


Diamond Cutters. 



R. WOOD SONS, 

21 Maiden Lane, 

f^EfV YORK. 



February 20, 1901. 


THE JEWELERS’ CIRCULAR-WEEKLY. 


The Real Rogers. 

Not in the Trust. 



All other extra-plate goods are guaranteed to^ 

HAVE THE SAME PROPORTIONATE PLATE, WHICH JS 
20 PER CENT. ABOVE STANDARD PLATE. 


Look for the Maltese Cross Trade=Marks. 



LAKEWOOD TEA SPOON. 


We offer the trade new patterns, beautifully finished goods, highest 
grade of plate guaranteed. 

We also make the No. 77 grade of plated ware, light-weight metal blanks, 
full plate of silver, regular list, and special discounts. 

Place no orders until you get a quotation from us. 


The Simeon L. & Qeo. H. Rogers Co., 


HARTFORD, CONN. 


P. O. BOX 1205. 


factories: 3 HARTFORD. CONN. 

/ WALLINGFORD, CONN. 



THE JEWELERS’ CIRCULAR-WEEKLY 


February ’20, 1001. 



PRIZE=WINNING WINDOWS 

intheWINDOW display C O M P ET I T I O N o f 


SIMMONS CHAINS. 


We show here photographic reproductions of the five windows which won the fourth prizes 
of $10 each in our window display contest. They are as follows: 

No. 1. — THE C. N. MAXWELL JEWELRY CO., Tuscaloosa, Ala. This display had for its centerpiece a 
large white globe with the map of the world marked thereon by Simmons Chains. 

No. 2. REID C) TODD, Bridgeport, Conn. Three large arches displayed the three Simmons window cards 
on a background of royal purple and silver. 

No. 3. LOUIS A. ANTOINE, Chicago, III. Big cables from the top of the second story supported signs on 
two sides of the store and the corner windows were filled with Simmons Chains. 

No. 4. GEO. E. SHAW, Putnam, Conn. A tasteful and very inexpensive display. Bright selected Autumn 
leaves, holding watches and chains, were distributed over a white ground. Festoons of chains lined the 
sides and back. 

No. 5. CA.MPBELL 6 CO., Chicago, III. A large suspension bridge whose cables were made of Simmons 
Chains was the center of attraction here. 


R. F. SIMMONS CO., 

ATTLEBORO. MASS. 

NEW YORK: 9 Maiden Lane. CHICAGO: 126 State Street. 



February 20, 1901. 


THE JEWELERS’ CIRCULAR-WEEKLY. 


7 


Precious Slone Markets. 


Paris, France, Feb. 10, 1901. 

Pearls . — The tendency of the pearl mar- 
ket is continuing unchanged, viz.: very 

firm. The patience of the East Indians 
who send their lines to London is remark- 
able. If they do not at once obtain the 
prices asked for their lots, they immedi- 
ately order their return. Many times, to 
a telegraphic offer below the prices asked, 
their only reply is another dispatch order- 
ing the immediate return of the pearls. 

Thus it is that the rich Indian consignors 
of pearls hold the lots sometimes for 10, 
15 or even 20 years. These lots are con- 
stantly making the trip between India 
and Europe, and their prices are always 
higher : there is never any reduction. The 
owners are perfectly certain that they will 
sell the pearls some time or another, and 
also aware of the fact that for the last 100 
years pearls have been constantly increasing 
in price. 


Schulz & Rudolph, 28 John St., New 
York, have just received a varied assort- 
ment of new timepieces from the Jiirgen- 
sen factory, among which is a watch that 
attracted much attention at the recent 
Paris Exposition on account of its com- 
plications, it being a chronograph, min- 
ute repeater, split second and minute regis- 
ter, with perpetual calendar, lunar phases, 
etc. It is a marvelously complicated piece 
of mechanism of unerring precision. 


ELSIE BEE’S FASHIONS. 


A ladt'sIrambles among the jewelers. 


Nouveau art seems to be taking the fine 
shops by storm. Watch cases of plain, 
lustrous colored enamel bear floral forms 
of carved gold in all degrees of relief from 
low to very high. So distinct are some of 
these forms that they have the effect of 
a spray of flowers laid carelessly on the 
case. The lotus, poppy, sunflower, chysan- 
themum, rose and other bold motives are 
most in evidence. 

* 

New art necklaces show in the jewelers’ 
cases side by side with the most costly 
pearl and diamond collars. There promises 
to be an era of colored stones in neck- 
wear. Tinted gold, many hued enamels 
and colored gems all combine in each sin- 
gle confection, making the new throat 
pieces radiantly beautiful. Each one also 
is a specimen of rare designing, for indi- 
viduality is the key note in the new form 
of jewelry. 

* 

A broad collar in open work of brilliants 
wherein are set, at intervals, nine very 
large cabochon turcjuoises (the long axis 
running across the collar), is a striking ex- 
ample of the growing vogue of color in 
the necklace. 

* 

The barbaric beauty of rough gold and 
uncut gems will be the next novelty ex- 
ploited, if one of those vague intimations 


which have ushered in all our late fashions 
is to be trusted. 

♦ 

Uncut stones are set in rings, purses, 
chains, umbrella tops, or wherever fancy 
dictates. 

m 

Jewelers provide ingenious devices for 
doing away with ear piercing, thus mak- 
ing easy the path of the newly favored or- 
nament. 

♦ 

Little, round balls of turquoise, about the 
size of a pea and perfect spheres of purest 
blue, are the captivating form of newest 
earrings. No mounting shows. 

* 

Rose gold reigns in the lorgnette and 
jeweling has become most elaborate. 

* 

Muff chains are massive and encircled 
with semi-precious stones. 

♦ 

Inexpressibly dainty is a ring com- 
posed of two small diamonds, oval cut and 
mounted one above and the other below 
the band of the ring, which is itself en- 
crusted with brilliants. The whole is 
an array of blue-white stones apparently 
devoid of any touch of metal. 

* 

A bracelet of rarest elegance consists of 
a mere thread of gold with a pendant com- 
prising first a square cut emerald, second 
a ruby, and last a marquise diamond. 

♦ 

Very thin watches are in evidence and. 



N. H. WHITE & CO. 


invite the attention of 
the trade to their 



DIAMOND STOCK, 



Mounted and Unmounted. 


MEMO. ORDERS SPECIALLY SOLICITED. 


They continue to be 


HEADQUARTERS tor AMERICAN WATCHES. 

2 \ Maiden Lane^ New York* 



THE JEWELERS’ CIRCULAR-WEEKLY. 


February 20, 1901. 


DIAMONDS. 

Wm. S. Hedges & Co., 

IMPORTERS OF 

Diamonds, other Precious Stones and Pearls. 

DIAMOND JEWELRY. 

170 Broadway, Maiden Lane, New York. 

36 Holborn Viaduct, London. 




Diamonds, Pearls 

AND FINE COLORED STONES. 




FRED. W. LEWIS & CO., 

i 

1 MAIDEN LANE, i 

IMPORTERS AND CUTTERS, NEW YORK. J 


John F. Saunders, Cutter and Importer of 

DIAMONDS PRECIOUS STONES. 

FINE PEARLS A SPECIALTY. 

68 Nassau St., cor. John St., ,6. NEW YORK. 









^stabtished /S49. 


ALVIN L. STRASBURGER. SOL. KAISER. 

DIAMONDS, 

Pearls, Emeralds, 
Rubles, Sapphires. 




9-13 Maiden Lane, 

NEW YORK. 

PARIS: CHICAGO: 

25 Boulev’d Haussmann. 103 State Street. 


• ^ 



conversely, others are of unusual bulk and I 
rotundity. 

« 

lady’s watch in plain black enamel and 
brilliants is a striking and elegant object. 

it- 

“Tooth” ring mountings are used for 
some very large diamonds for men’s wear. 

They' display the stone with great effective- 
ness. 

♦ 

Pretty tie clips of gold wire in heart 
shape are useful accessories in the evening 
toilet. They are set with pearls and tur- 
quoises. 

* 

An adjustable bracelet adapts itself to 
any size of wrist. It is constructed on the 
trellis pattern and contracts or expands 
after the fashion of the familiar iron gate. 

* 

Two butterflies in pearls, each mounted 
on a small safety pin and connected by a 
tiny chain, form a very pretty lace acces- 
sory. Lace is now lavishly used and jew- 
els never find a more becoming back- 
ground. 

It is rumored that the popular gold tags 
are to be varied with crystal ones. 

* 

The “fiddle” shape furnishes a smart 
variation in the backs of hair brushes. 


The “natural growth” idea is very no- 
ticeable in silver ware designing. There 
is much brightly polished silver to be seen. 

Elsie Bee. 


Corals in Paris. 


W E have repeatedly reported the 
growing vogue of the coral. This 
stone is now extremely fashionable. In 
all the showcases of the fine Paris jewelry 
stores one can see coral trinkets where we 
were not wont to see any for years. 

Coral of pale shades is particularly fav- 
ored, the price of this variety having 
trebled during the past two years. 

The dainty, dark haired, bright eyed 
coral workers at Naples are rejoicing, as 
the fruit of their labor is increasing again. 
The chief source of material for these 
feminine operators is the precious coral 
(Corallium ntbntm) occurring in the 
Mediterranean. i\Iost corals are collected 
from rocky banks in the Mediterranean, 
on the coasts of Sardinia, Sicily. Xoril. 
Africa and also in the Adria. 

About 150,000 to 200.000 kilos is fished 
annually in the Mediterranean Sea, repre- 
senting a value of about .*1.500.000. The 
price per kilo is estimated according to 
color — pale pink is the prettiest — at from $1 
to $600, but at the present time about $75 
is paid on an average for good merchan- 
dise. Chief markets for corals are Paris 
and Naples, hut since the charming orna- 
ment is again entering into favor there is 
likely to be a demand for it at other places 
as well for a long time to come. It can- 
not he gainsaid that the coral is always 
pretty, whether in vogue or not. 


February 20, 1901. 


THE JEWELERS’ CIRCULAR-WEEKLY. 


9 


The Situation at Antwerp. 


Paris, Feb. 10. — The strike of the 
diamond workers has been declared sus- 
pended for lack of funds until the next re- 
vival of business. It has been decided to 
organize the federation by forming a 
powerful “caisse de resistance,” so as to be 
able to succeed better in the future. The 
federation of the “Antwerpsche Diamant 
Bewerkers Bereenigung” has issued forth 
stronger and better organized than before 
the strike, despite its loss. 

The number of its members has risen 
from 600 to 2,500, who now regularly pay 
their assessment of one franc per week. 
They have also founded a co-operative 
society among themselves for the purpose 
of procuring all they need in their house- 
holds at favorable prices and terms. On 
the other hand, the employers and “eigen- 
gewerkmakers” have also founded, in 
agreement with some workmen, a society 
of mutual aid. Already 300 members have 
been enrolled. The workmen pay 50 
centimes for assessment per week each and 
each employer and “eigengewerkmaker” 
agrees to pay as much per “meule,” ordin- 
arily occupied by him. 

The employers also bind themselves to 
give the preference to these workmen, as 
they require them. Several workmen have 
had to appear of late before the court for 
violation of the liberty to work and rebel- 
lion against the police. The majority have 
been acquitted; others have been con- 
demned to the payment of small fines 
amounting to a few francs, which proves 
that many charges made against them 
were exaggerated. 

A committee were organized here two 
years ago among the merchants and work- 
men under the honorary presidency of 
Louis Coetermans, with the object of col- 
lecting money to erect a statue of Louis 
Bercken, the originator of diamond cut- 
ting at Antwerp. Owing to the crisis in 
the business, the project had been deferred 
to a more favorable time. Now the said 
committee have resumed their activity and 
have addressed an appeal to the people to 
assist in the work, which is expected to be 
crowned with success. 

The strike has wrought great damage. 
It was impossible for the manufacturers to 
finish all the work which had been com- 
menced, and for that reason many foreign 
dealers who came here at the end of 
November last were not able to find 
what they desired to purchase. A few 
have bought some lots of the old stock; 
of the new merchandise little has been 
sold, several manufacturers being left with 
the larger part of their goods on hand. 
This state of affairs seems to point to a 


CHESTER BILLINGS £ 

SUCCESSORS TO RANDEL, BAREMORE 

f SON 

& BILLINGS 

1840 

Randel & Baremore 

1866 

Randel, Baremore & Co. 
1880 

Randel, Baremore Sc 
Billings 

IMPORTERS OF 

DIAMONDS 

OTHER PRECIOUS STONES AND PEARLS 

p DIAMOND 

1^40 jewelry 

New York 
58 Nassau Street 
29 Maiden Lane 

London, E. C. 

22 Holborn Viaduct 




DAY, CLARK & CO., 

MA.KKRS OB' 

Kine Jewelry, 

x4k. 0N1.Y. MAIDEN IvANE, 

Trade-MarU NEW YORK. 

1 



AMERICAN «Z<> ORIENTAL PEARLS 

IMPORTERS OF FINE COLORED STONES AND DIAMONDS. 

ADOLF J. GRINBERG CO., ' 

8 MAIDEN LANE, NEW YORK. 


THE JEWELERS’ CIRCULAR-WEEKLY. February 20, 1901. 


fresh crisis in our industry at a more or 
less near period, for everybody familiar 
with the diamond business knows that the 
foreipn buyers will not return before the 
month of March or April. 

Up to the present the workmen have had 
no cause for complaint on account of lack 
of work, for the demand has exceeded the 
offerings, the result of which has been that 
some large firms have raised the salary ol 
their employes a little so as to keep them. 

Let us hope that in future, if the strike 
question is still stirring, labor will arrive 
at a better understanding with capital for 
the welfare of all concerned. 

The old diamond cutting establishment 
of Mr. Van Emden has been sold to a 
syndicate of six polishers for the sum of 
SS.OtiO francs. A few years ago this plant 
was bought at 120,000 francs. — From Ant- 
werp correspondence in Le Diamant. 


Jules Wtndell & Son, Oswego, N. Y., 
have recently had their store redecorated. 

S. C. Suyeiam, Baldwinsville, N. Y., has 
been confined to his home for several 
weeks past by an aggravated attack of the 
shingles. 

W. F. Main and M. E. Price, of the \V. 
F. Main Co., wholesale and manufacturing 
jewelers. Iowa City, la., have gone east 
on a business trip. 

The firm of Stone & Beckwith have dis- 
solved b}' the retirement of L. S. Beckwith, 
and their business will hereafter be trans- 
acted at Ilion, X. Y.. by George H. P. 
Stone. Their New York office is at 11 
John St. 


The Petition, .In Bankruptcy of Fred J. 

Stilson. 

.-\tl.-\nt.-\, Ga., Feb. 12. — Fred J. Stilson, 
for many years proprietor of one of the 
best known jewelry houses in the city, 
through his attorneys. King & Anderson 
and Lewis W. Thomas, Feb. 9, filed a peti- 
tion in voluntary bankruptcy in the United 
Slates District Court. The petition sets 
forth that the assets are $29,240.24, the 
stock and fixtures amounting to $22,080. 
The bills, notes and accounts are put down 
at $3,079.74. In addition to the foregoing 
the other assets are a lot of land at Oxana, 
Ala., for which Mr. Stilson paid $500 some 
eight or 10 years ago, and $20,000 par 
value of the stock of the Gadsden Land Co., 
for which he paid $2,300. The other assets 
consist of a small amount of cash on hand. 

Mr. Stilson’s liabilities are set forth at 
$27,808.72, only a small amount of which 
is preferred. The preferred creditors in- 
clude taxes amounting to $155.48, a small 
amount due the clerks in the store, a local 
creditor who is secured to the amount of 
$500, and the attorneys who are represent- 
ing him in the case. The unsecured credi- 
tors include firms in New York, Cincin- 
nati, Boston, Providence, and Mrs^ Stil- 
son, to whom is due an amount advanced 
by her to aid in paying the creditors of the 
old firm of Stilson & Collins at the time of 
iheir failure about two years ago. 

Judge Newman the same day appointed 
T. D. Meador, vice-president of the Lowry 
National Bank, receiver of the stock, fix- 
tures and other property, and in accord- 
ance with the order of the court Mr. Mea- 


dor took charge. It is probable arrange- 
ments will be made to continue the busi- 
ness under the receivership. Mr. Meador 
gave bonds in the sum of $10,000. The 
case will be referred to Percy Adams as 
referee. 

Mr. Stilson has been in business in 
Atlanta for many years and has made 
numerous friends. 


Good Openings for Watchmakers and 
Jewelers in the West. 

Omaha, Neb., Feb. 15. — The old saying 
of Horace Greeley, “Go west, young man,” 
was never as true as it is to-day with re- 
gard to watchmakers and jewelers. The 
demand for good workmen has been heavy 
for several years all through this territory. 
Wholesale dealers of Omaha are in con- 
stant communication with retailers through- 
out Nebraska, Iowa, Colorado, South Da- 
kota and Wyoming, who wish to secure 
good watchmakers. The horological school 
in this city is turning out graduates con- 
tinually, but thev are not in sufficient num- 
ber to supply the demand. When, added to 
this condition of things, good wages are 
offered, it seems strange that more men do 
not learn the business or more of the unem- 
ployed come west. A good workman is al- 
ways sure of a position. A poor one will 
not hold it long. 

It is also worthy of note that there are 
many very '^^ood openings for jewelers and 
watchmakers with a small amount of cap- 
ital. In fact, if a good workman comes 
with first class recommendations he need 
have very little capital. The writer has 
been told repeatedly by an Omaha whole- 


PEARLS. 




♦ 

♦ 

♦ 

4t 

♦ 

♦ 

♦ 

♦ 

♦ 

4t 

4c 

4c 

4c 


I 

4c 

4: 

♦ 

4c 


4c 

4c 

4c 

♦ 


Prepared : 


When you are in need of anything unusual, you generally 
want it in a hurry. That is the time to remember that our 
stock is not only replete with diamonds, pearls and precious 
stones of the grades usually carried, but that it contains gems 
of a character that cannot be duplicated. 

We have extraordinary facilities for securing the best in the 
markets of the world. The condition of our stock evidences 
this fact at a glance. 

Alfred H. Smith & Co., 


CHICAGO. 


182 Broadway, N. Y. 


LONDON. 




DIAMONDS 


And other Precious Stones 


February 20, 1901. 


THE JEWELERS’ CIRCULAR-WEEKLY. 


11 


saler that he would be only too Had to fur- 
nish the outfit on time for any reliable 
watchmaker and jeweler who would estab- 
lish himself in business in his territory. 
There is one place on the Burlington where 
a dealer who had been doing a big business 
was obliged to remove on account of per- 
sonal affairs. He could find no one to take 
his place, and that town is without a jew- 
eler. There are also openings along the 
Northwestern in Iowa and the Rock Island 
roads where a few hundred dollars to start 
with would enable a man to work into a 
paying business. No matter how much 
other business may be overdone, there is a 
scarcity of watchmakers in the west, and 
the man who understands his business and 
will come west is assured of a competency. 


Practical Machine for the Cleaving of 
Diamonds. 

Washington, D. C., Feb. 15. — A c'ipping 
from a Belgian newspaper received by the 
State Department sets forth the informa- 
tion that the diamond industry is at the 
present moment very much occupied with 
a curious invention — a machine for cleav- 
ing diamonds. It is known that the work 
of cleaving constitutes a special branch, 
and a very delicate one, in the art of work- 
ing diamonds. 

The machine in question, it appears, ac- 
complishes this difficult feat, and the manu- 
facturers will realize great advantages 
therefrom. The machine was invented in 
America. The large cutting firms in Brus- 
sels are, at this moment, making trial of it. 


More of the Charles E. Katsch Jewelry 
Stock Recovered. 

New Haven, Conn., Feb. 13. — The exam- 
ination of Charles E. Katsch in the bank- 
ruptcy court was postponed to-day until 
next Monday by an arrangement made with 
Referee Newton. The referee has decided 
that the stock in Mr. Katsch's new store 
did not belong to the American Jewelry 
Co., as was alleged, and the creditors will 
share in whatever benefits are to be derived 
from this stock. Deputy United States 
Marshal Bowen has, in addition to the 
stock that was seized recently, found more 
stock that is valued at about $3,000. It con- 
sists of rings, watches and valuable stones. 
The articles seized will be added to the 
stock already in the hands of the trustee. 


ESTATE OF JOHN C. MOUNT. 


ADDISON W. WOODHULL. 


MOUNT 6 WOODHULL, 

Formerly with late firm of RANDEL, BAREMORE & BILLINGS. 


IMPORTERS OF^Jijt DIAMONDS, 00000000 

OTHER PRECIOUS STONES, 
PEARLS, ETC. 0000000 


MAKERS 

FIJVE 

DIAMOND 

JEWELKY. 


26 Maiden Lane 


fSouthwest Corner Nassau Street), 


NEW YORK. 


() 

() 


William Kleinschmidt . George H. Howland. Frederick W. Ehrbard. 



^Pearl Merchants. 

W e make a specialty of importing 

FINE, FANCY AND RARE GEMS: 

Trilbies . — Emeralds — Sapphires — Colored and Fancy 
Shaped TDiamonds. 

189 iSroadwa^f 7few 2/ork, 


a 


Charles Babe and Marion Mann, Fari- 
bault, Minn., are under arrest on a charge 
of robbing F. Z. Sherwood’s jewelry store 
in Faribault. The police suspected them 
and kept a sharp watch on their actions, 
as well as a lookout for the stolen prop- 
erty in pawnshops. Part of the missing 
goods was lately found in a St. Paul sec- 
ond-hand store. The proprietor gave a 
description of the men who sold him the 
goods and it fits the men in charge very 
well. 


1837. 

Geo. O. Street. 

1842. 

Geo. O. Street & Co. 

1863. 

Geo. O. Street & Son. 
1880. 

Geo. O. Street & Sons. 


FINE GOODS ONLY. 


GEO. O. STREET & SONS, 


Manufacturing Je'w^elers, 


TRADE 

CHICAGO OFFICE, 

103 State Street. 



MARK. 

24 JOHN STREET, 

NE'W YORK. 



IMPORTERS 

AND 

JOBBERS OF 


DIAMONDS 

WATCHES 

JEWELRY 


9-11-13 MAIDEN LANE, 

NEW YORK. 


62-64 STATE STREET, 

ALBANY, N. Y. 


1-2 


THE JEWELERS’ CIRCULAR-WEEKLY. 


February 20, 1901. 


The Creed- Kellogg Co. Suffer by a 
Serious Fire. 

Boston, Mass.. Feb. 16. — The Creed- 
Kellogg Co., dealers in jewelry and novel- 
ties, were the principal victims in a $150,000 
tire. Wednesday night, in the si.x-story 
brick and stone structure at the corner of 
Essex and Kingston Sts., known as the 
Kingston building. The fire was discovered 
about 11 o’clock and was first made known 
to the firemen by means of the automatic 
alarm in the building. This was followed 
by three alarms. The weather was bitterly 
cold and handicapped the firemen in han- 
dling the long lines of hose, ladders, etc. 
The fire is believed to have been caused by 
spontaneous combustion among the stock 
of the Creed-Kellogg Co. on the second 
floor. 


The enormous quantities of water poured 
into the buitding resulted in a perfect flood 
of jewelry, combs, etc., being washed down 
the stairs from the second floor. This stock 
was carried out into the streets and the 
crowds were not slow’ to take advantage of 
this opportunity to obtain jewelry at lower 
prices than usual. As soon as the police 
became aware of what was going on, they 
interfered, but not until many rings and 
other pieces of jewelry had been taken 
awa\'. 


G. M. Kernahan, New London, la., has 
given a chattel mortgage for $81. 

The store of L. G. Prescott, Princeton, 
Minn., was burned out lately, but he is 
starting up again. 


Annual Meeting of Wallingford Corpo- i 
rations. 

Wallingford, Conn., Feb. 16.— The j 
annual meeting of the R. Wallace & Sons 
Mfg. Co. was held this afternoon and the | 
follow’ing directors were elected: Frank 

A. Wallace, Henry L. Wallace, Walter J. 
Leavenworth, Wallingford; George M. > 
Wallace, New Haven; Selah A. Hull. 
George M. Curtis, Meriden, and Henry 
J. Lewis. The officer^, elected comprised: 
President, Frank A. Wallace; secretary, 
Henry L. Wallace; treasurer, Walter J. 
Leavenworth; assistant treasurer, Clifford 
W. Leavenworth; superintendent, Charles 
D. Morris. 

This afternoon the annual meeting of 
the Valentine-Linsley Co. was held, and 
the directors elected comprised the fol- 
lowing: Frank A. Wallace, Clifford W. 

Leavenworth, Charles D. Morris, Frank 
W. Morris, E. C. Valentine. The direc- 
tors elected these officers: President, 

Clifford W. Leavenworth: treasurer, 

Charles D. Morris; secretary, E. C. Valen- : 
tine. 


Death of an Old Time Jeweler. 

Springfield, Mass., Feb. 16. — Francis 
Norton, Tax Collector of the city of Spring- 
field for 49 years and who died last week, 
was for several years a leading jeweler of 
the city. He had been in poor health for a 
long time and was compelled to resign his 
office as collector, but as he would not be 
relieved of office until April 1, death fore- 
stalled his purpose. 

Born 75 years ago, he was of stock that 
traced itself back to George Norton, who 
settled in this country in 1629. The de- 
ceased entered upon his business training at 
the age of 20, in Hartford, Conn., and after 
a few years as a clerk in general stores, de- 
termined to branch out for himself, and 
with J. M. Skiff opened a jewelry’ store in 
this city, and the firm continued successfully 
for a few years until they dissolved, and 
Mr. Norton continued the business alone 
until 1859, when he was elected City Col- 
lector. At that time Springfield was a city 
of 15,000 with a tax levy of $79,000 an- 
nually, while to-day it has a population of 
over 62,000 and a tax levy exceeding $1,000,- 
000. In 1860 he was elected an assessor 
and held the office until 1883, barring three 
years, when, the duties of his old office hav- 
ing increased, he gave up the assessorship. 


Suggested License Fees for the District j 
of Columbia. 

Washington, D. C., Feb. 16. — In re- 
sponse to a Senate resolution calling upon • 
the District commissioners to furnish such a ^ 
schedule of license fees as, in their opinion, 
should be levied and collected on the differ- 
ent trades, occupations and business en- j 

terprises in the District of Columbia, the > 

Assessor of the District has forwarded a list 
which, to his office, he says, seems equitable 
and just. Among other trades and occupa- 
tions, the following are mentioned: 

Auctioneers, $100 per year ; business brok- : 
ers, $10 ; dealers in general merchandise, per 
$1,000 on stock, $10 ; dealers in general mer- : 
chandise, per $100, $2 ; silversmiths, $12. j 

E. J. Saxe, Detroit, Wis., has opened a : 
store at La Crosse, Wis. He will carry > 
stock and do general repairing. 




Timely Advice 

And the best advice we can offer 
is to replenish your depleted stock 
of Diamonds and Diamond Jewelry 
NOW. It is not too early. If 
you haven’t the goods to offer, of 
course you cannot make sales, 
but if you make a proper showing 
NOW you will be surprised at the 
extent of your Spring business. 
Besides, it will gain you a reputa- 
tion as a diamond house that will 
be of considerable value to you 
when the busy season begins. In 
the meantime, if you have calls 
for special pieces that you haven’t 
in stock, we can help you. 

Hayden W. Wheeler & Co., 

TWO MAIDEN LANE, N. Y. 

Talaphona, 8 Cortlandt. 

80 HOLBORN VIADUCT, LONDON. 




February 20, 1901. THE JEWELERS’ CIRCULAR-WEEKLY. 


13 


Tariff Decisions & Regulations. 


DRAWB.\CK ON WATCHMEN’S CLOCKS. 

Washington, D. C., Feb. 13. — The fol- 
lowing letter has been issued by the Treas- 
ury Department regarding drawback al- 
lowed on watchmen’s clocks manufactured 
by the Newman Clock Co., Chicago, 111., 
from imported clock movements and do- 
mestic metal cases and keys : 

Treasury Department, Feb. U, 1901. 

Sir: — On the exportation of watchmen’s clocks 
manufactured by the Newman Clock Co., of Chi- 
cago, 111., from imported clock movements and 
domestic metal cases and keys, a drawback will be 
allowed equal to the amount of the duties paid on 
the imported materials used, less the legal deduc- 
tion of one per cent. 

The drawback entry in each case should identify 
each movement exported by numbers, marks, sizes, 
etc., as shown by the import invoices, subject to 
verification and examination by the collector. 

Respectfully, 

O. L. Spaulding, 
Assistant Secretary. 

Collector of Customs, Chicago, 111. 


EICHBERQ & CO., 

Importers and Cutters of 


DIAMONDS, 

65 Nassau Street (Prescott Building), NEW YORK. 


“The 

EISENMANN BROS., 

Pearl 

IMPORTERS OF 

FINE ORIENTAL PEARLS, 

House.” 

« 

Diamonds and Precious Stones, 

Paris, 3 Rue St. Georges. 21 & 23 MAIDEN LANE, N. Y. 


The Continued Case of John Smith, 
Charged with Larceny. 

Boston, Mass., Feb. 16. — The continued 
case of John Smith, the man charged with 
the larceny of a diamond ring valued at 
$100, the property of Robert P. Stahl, Jew- 
elers building, was called in the East Bos- 
ton District Court, this forenoon. Since a 
week ago Friday, when the case was last 
heard, it has developed that the ring does 
not belong to Mr. Stahl, but was given to 
him by another man to sell. 

When the case was called, last week, it 
will be remembered, a young woman wit- 
ness declined to answer the questions of the 
Court and was sentenced to 15 days in jail 
for contempt. After one night in jail, she 
sent word to Judge Emmons that if released 
she would tell all she knew of the case. In 
court to-day she gave the name of Mrs. 
George Brown. What testimony she gave 
was stated privately to Judge Emmons and 
counsel Thomas F. Rice. After hearing her 
testimony, the Court found Smith not 
guilty and ordered his discharge. Mr. Stahl 
was not present and the ring was given to 
its owner, a Mr. Poole. 


M. Weinstein will move his jewelry store 
in Webster, S. D., to new quarters. 


SCHULZ & RUDOLPH, 

IMPORTERS OF 

Diamonds and other Precious Stones. 

SOLE AGENTS FOR 

JULES JURQENSEN WATCHES. 


28 John Street and 65 Nassau Street, = • New York. 


1 

Established 1872. 

A. ROSEMAN, 

IMPORTER OF DIAMONDS, 

MAKER OF DIAMOND JEWELRY. 

HEADQUARTERS FOR AMERICAN WATCHES. 

9, 11, 13 Maiden Lane, New York. 


U 

> 

u 

o 


t/i 

a. 

e 


M 

U 

QQ 

3 

ec 

u 

BU 

P 

Z 

u 

3 

M 


CATSEYBS 


SAPPHIRES DIAMONDS RUBIES EMERALDS PEARLS PEARL NECKS PEARL ROPES 


IS 

(t 


o 

o 


O UR stock of Diamonds, Pearls and Precious Stones being the largest 
and best assorted in the trade is specially adapted to the filling of 
regular orders. A well-known feature of our business on which we 
bestow careful attention is the catering for memorandum orders for goods 
which are too expensive to be carried in regular stocks. 

Our goods are insured in transit to any amount. 

Complete stock of Pearl Necks and Pearl Collarettes with Diamond 
Bars. 

19-20 S^aduct. JOSEPH FRANKEL’S S 0 NS,««n~e^*‘'v"o*r‘!^'.*‘’ 

TELEPHONE, 2733 JOHN. 

FANCY COLORED DIAMONDS and OEMS in PEARLS and PRECIOUS STONES. 


OB 

M 

3 


14 


THE JEWELERS’ CIRCULAR-WEEKLY. 


February 20, 1901. 


Philadelphiil Jewelers’ Annual. 

New Officers Elected and Preparations Effected 
for tbe .Annual Banquet. 

Phtl.\pelphi.\. Pa.. Feb. 20. — The annual 
meeting of the Philadelphia Jewelers’ Club 
was held last night at the headquarters of 
this popular orgranization, 122a Chestnut St. 
The date for the annual banquet was fixed 
and committees named to arrange the de- 
tails and appoint the various sub-commit- 
tees. Ofiicers were, elected to serve for the 
current year. The reports of the treasurer 
and secretary were received and read, and, 
although considerable enthusiasm was 
manifested during the balloting, it was. with 
the exception of the election of the vice- 
president. more or less cut and dried, as 
foreshadowed in The Circul.\r-Weekly’s 
report of the meeting when the candidates 
for office were nominated. 

The by-laws of the club provide that the 
vice-president shall be a non-resident of 
Philadelphia, and. as the majority of non- 
residents are Xew Yorkers, there is always 
considerable electioneering for candidates 
from Maiden I.ane. This j^ear Archie 
Rutherford, of H. .A.. Kirby Co., and Harry 
C. Carter, of Carter. Eleox & Co., were the 
nominees. Both are popular men. The 
voting was spirited and resulted in the elec- 
tion of Archie Rutherford. One of the 
features of the meeting was the overwhelm- 
ing vote in favor of J. Warner Hutchins, 
the retiring president of the club, as a 
member of the board of governors. He 
received the highest number of votes cast 
during the week. The election resulted as 
follows : 

President. Couis P. White. 7<)6 Chestnut 
St. ; vice-president. Archie Rutherford, of 
H. A. Kirby Co. : treasurer, Wm. F. Parry, 
Jr., S. S. White Dental Co. ; secretary, Wm. 
S. Quinn, of H. Muhr’s Sons; board of 
governors, J. Warner Hutchins, Wm. P. 
Sackett, Wm. H. Cong, G. Cee and 
Newton B. Eking. 


When Mr/ Hutchins, who presided at the 
meeting, turned over the president’s chair 
to Mr. White, he gave a heart-to-heart talk 
to the members of the club, and when he 
closed there were maii)^ moist eyes — an un- 
jvrecedented incident. Mr. White replied 
feelingly, and Air. Cong, on behalf of the 
members of the club, expressed sincere re- 
grets at the retirement of Mr. Hutchins. 

The report of Mr. Parry, treasurer, was 
then read and showed that the club was in 
a better financial condition than ever be- 
fore. Mr. Quinn’s report, as secretary, 
showed that the club had 150 members in 
good standing and that there were 30 on 
the waiting list, the majority of whom had 
been waiting for months past. It was then 
moved that the by-laws be amended to in- 
crease the membership from 159 to 175, and 
after some little discussion, this was done. 
Mr. Kelly made the motion. Mr. White 
suggested that a permanent art exhibit 
be made to enhance the appearance and 
furnishings of the club’s quarters. This 
met with the approval of the members, who 
pledged themselves to contribute to the ex- 
hibit objects of art from time to time. 

The next business of the club was to ar- 
range for the fifth annual banquet, to be 
held next month, in accordance with the 
custom of former years. Tuesday, March 
12, was agreed upon as the date. The place 
of holding the banquet will be left to the 
banquet committee to decide. President 
White then appointed the following as 
members of the banquet committee : J. 

Warner Hutchins, chairman, Wm. G. 
Earle, Wm. P. Sackett, Wm. H. Long, Wm. 
Linker, Wm. Bruehl, Fred. Simons, James 
H. Kelly and Howard L. Roberts. The re- 
ception committee will be announced by 
Mr. White later. 


T. W. Humphrey sold out the jewelry 
business he had been conducting in Bill- 
ings, Mont., to J. Forester, for a considera- 
tion of $5,000. 


New York Jewelry Workers Hold a Public 
Meeting. 

Local Union No. 1, International Jewelry 
W’orkers’ Union of America, held a public 
meeting and revived its charter, in Odd Fel- 
lows’ Hall, 09 St. Mark’s PL, New York, 
Thursday evening. There was a fair rep- 
resentation of the jewelry shop workers of 
New York. The main object of the meeting 
was to secure, so far as possible, a reunion 
between the members of the organization 
who remained members all through the 
strike and those who, for various reasons, 
dropped out during that contest in 1899. as 
well as to secure new members from among 
the men who had never joined a trade 
union. 

Herman Robinson, general organizer of 
the American Federation of Labor for the 
State of New York, addressed the meeting. 
He outlined the advantages of organized 
labor and spoke of the special benefits in 
the jewelry trade. Samuel Prince, Assem- 
blyman representing the 16th district, and 
Charles Herwig, international secretary of 
the union, were other speakers. 

International president Frederick Drissler 
made an address and presented a charter 
which made Union No. 1 an officially recog- 
nized branch of the International Jewelry 
Workers’ Union of America. Ihe officers 
of the union stated that it is now in a better 
condition in every way than ever, with the 
membership constantly increasing. 


J. A. Schirrman, Fargo, N. Dak., has 
filed a voluntary petition in bankruptcy. 

Burlingame Bros, have decided to quit 
business in Hartford City, Ind., and will 
shortly move the stock to some point iii 
Michigan. 

Hiram E. Smith, Madison. Wis., who 
about a year ago disposed of his interests 
to his partner, W. J. Gamm, and spent the 
time since then in Norway regaining his 
health, has purchased the business of A. E. 
Thoreson, at 123 E. 5Iain St., Madison. 



♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦ 


V3' Importers and Cutters, 


I CORNER NASSAU and JOHN STREETS, NEW YORK. 

Amsterdam, 2 Tulp Straat. - - London, 45 Holborn Viaduct. 


: 


^ ♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦ 




February 20, 1901. 


THE JEWELERS’ CIRCULAR-WEEKLY. 


15 


Charles L. Tiffany Enters Upon His 90th 
Year Under Happy Auspices. 

Charles L. Tiffany, of Tiffany & Co., 
New York, entered upon his 90th year under 
peculiarly happy and favorable auspices, 
Feb. 15. lie has just recovered from a se- 
vere cold and it was his first appearance at 
Tiffany’s in two weeks. This was the long- 
est that he had ever been away on account 
of illness in his entire business career of 64 
years ; in fact, he had never before been ab- 
sent more than three days consecutively in 
consequence of sickness. 

All morning, wagons and messengers ar- 
rived at his home, at 255 Madison Ave., 
with the tributes of regard from his many 
friends throughout the city, and when he 
reached his office, at Union Square, he 
found awaiting him beautiful floral tokens 
from his employes and more cablegrams, 
letters and messages than he could find time 
to read, as he was overwhelmed with the 
fervent greetings and well wishes of his 
hundreds of employes, who know him only 
as a friend. They were overjoyed to see 
their chief once more at his desk, and their 
warm expressions of regard received cor- 
dial acknowledgments, filled with grateful- 
ness for their kind sentiments. 


New Members in the Firm of Patek, 
Philippe & Co. 

The announcement has just been made 
that ‘Alfred G. Stein, the American repre- 
sentative of Patek, Philippe & Co,, and 
Jules Perrier, for 30 years an important 
collaborator of the firm, have been ad- 
mitted to partnership in the firm. 

Mr. Stein, who was born in New York 
in December, 1866, received his early edu- 
cation in a remote part of Alabama, near 
Mobile, where his father still lives. He 
studied horology under F. W. C. Nieberg 
and for two years was employed at the 
bench with Tiffany & Co. Since then he 
has been with Patek, Philippe & Co., 
representing them at the Chicago Exposi- 
tion in 1893, where he had charge of their 
exhibit and acted as secretary of the Swiss 
Commission in the Horological Section. 
He was the only judge from this coun- 
try on horology at the Paris Exposi- 
tion in 1900, and was one of the three 
United States delegates to the Interna- 
tional Congress of Chronometry and 
Chronology. It is interesting to note that 
Mr. Stein is the first American member of 
the firm, the cosmopolitan character of 
which is shown by the fact that since the 
establishment of the business, in 1837, be- 
sides its founder, Antoine Norbert de 
Patek, a nobleman from Poland, it has in- 
cluded Adrian Philippe and, two other 
Frenchmen, one Russian, one Greek, one 
German and several Swiss. The achieve- 
ments of the firm in the horological field, 
their successes in various timing contests 
and the many honors gained by them at 
exhibitions are well known to the readers 
of The Circular-Weekly. 


The Capital City Jewelry Co., Des 
Moines, la., have perfected their organiza- 
tion and have leased quarters in the 
Youngerman block, to do a wholesale busi- 
ness. Several traveling men will be put 
on the road at once. B. Siegel, formerly 
a retailer, is the principal stockholder. 


PEARLS. 


256 Westminster St., Providence, R. I. Tel. No. 

10 Rue Cadet, Paris. 662 Cortl’t. 

Lapidary Works: 93=95 William St., New York. 


; QOODFRIEND BROS., 

9-11-13 Maiden Lane, New York. 




STERN BROS. & CO., 

IMPORTERS AND CUTTERS OF 

DIAMONDS, 


CUTTING WORKS: 
138-142 West 14th St.,N.Y. 


CHICAQO, 

149 State Street. 


LONDON, 

29 Ely Place. 


68 Nassau St., 

NEW YORK. 

MALLIET, MAXWELL & ROSS, 

Diattiona €utter$, 


14 MAIDEN LANE, 


NEW YORK. 


LONDON, 50 Holborn Viaduct. 
AMSTERDAM, 2 Tulpstraat. 


DIAMONDS. 


SAPPHIRES. 


E MERALDS. 


!Popularj^iffhClass^iamond ^ewelri/, 

^esiffns and Estimates <^urnished. 

H, GATTLE, 7 Maiden Lane, JVeW York. 

9^emoranc/um Orders Ooiicilod. 


RUDIES. 


OPALS. 


PEARLS. 


♦ ♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦.♦♦♦♦ 

♦ ^ I I ♦ 

♦ >• * k ^ ^ ♦ 


I dCirsh <Sc dfyman, ^cZlTcT’''' 

J 40 T^aic/en Xane, ^/(imOnC^S, 

^ -N.T TT-XTir •VT'/'M.J TX- ^ WW M rn ^ V' WV' w 


NEW YORK. 


^♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦^ 




ir> 


THE JEWELERS’ CIRCULAR-WEEKLY 


February 20, 1901. 


Alfred H. Smith 6 Co., 

Importers of Gems, 

182 BROADWAY, NEW YORK, 

WILL ‘BUY 

American “Pearls 

THE FINER AND MORE lMPOR= 

TANT THE BETTER. SEND 
THEM TO US, WITH LOWEST 
CASH PRICE, AND WE WILL RE= 

PORT IMMEDIATELY. 


Importations at the 

Port 

of New 

York. 

Weeks Ended Feb. 16, 

1900, and Feb. 15, 

1901. 

China, Glass and Earthen 

1 Ware 

: 1900. 

1901. 

China 


$35,583 

$40,367 

Earthen ware 


. 30,301 

10,576 

Glass ware 


. 14,795 

19,102 

Instruments : 

Musical 


9.699 

10,036 

Optical 


8,069 

4,841 

Philosophical 


193 

L661 

Tewelry, etc.: 

Jewelry 


. 16,974 

20,859 

Precious stones 


. 166,982 

338,419 

Watches 


15,318 

22,737 

Metals, etc. : 

Bronzes 


619 

4,560 

Cutlery 


. 27,285 

23,211 

Dutch metal 


2,536 

2,833 

Plated ware 


834 

403 

Platina 


9.574 

25,968 

Silver ware 


1,313 

1,523 

Miscellaneous: 

.Alabaster ornaments 


1,970 

131 

Beads 


4,619 

1,742 

Clocks 


3,476 

7,821 

Fans 


8,366 

9.025 

Fancy goods 


5,905 

9,161 

Ivorv 


402 


Ivory, manufactures 

of . . . . 

644 

728 

Marble, manufactures of... 

, . 10,031 

1,703 

Statuary 


2,313 

4,118 


Third Annual Entertainment of the Buy- 
ers’ Association of America. 


PATEK, PHILIPPE & CO., swSiInd. 

MAKERS IN THE HIGHEST QUALITY OF 

Fine, Plain, Complicated 

And Decorated Watches 

HAVE ADDED TO THEIR MANY RECOMPENSES AND DISTINCTIONS, 

HORS CONCOURS, 

AT THE PARIS EXPOSITION. 


Importers of 
DIAMONDS AND 

& 

14 Maiden Lane 

(Diamond Exchange Building), 

NEW YORK. 


|4K. COLD PENS AND FOUNTAIN PENS 



SONS, 



SEND 'FOR ~ 

illustrateiT j 

PRICE-LISTS. I 


Gold Pens Repaired for the Trade, 25c. 


Send Stamps 
with Pens. 


DIAMOND POINT PEN CO., 102 J Beekman Street, N. Y., U.S.A. | 


The third annual entertainment and re- 
ception of the Buyers’ Association of Amer- 
ica and tlieir friends was held, Thursday 
night, at Sherry’s, New York, with -1,00(> 
present. After an informal reception was a 
musical programme which lasted until 11 
o’clock, when a grand march began the danc- 
ing. Representatives of the large depart- 
ment houses were present from New York, 
Jersey City, Cleveland, Sioux Cit 3 % Rich- 
mond, San Francisco, Baltimore, Philadel- 
phia, Newark, Boston, New Haven and Kan- 
sas City. The committee of arrangements 
consisted of G. M. Butler, B. M. Sinks, R. C. 
Dickman. The reception committee were 
E. M. Lostman, Leo Kaufman, C. L. Smith, 
W. J. Beckton, A. L. Fletcher, Benjamin 
Braun, J. Flegenheimer, J. L. Adrien, T. J. 
Churchill, Charles S. Wood. 

The Buyers’ Association announce that 
there has been during the past year an in- 
crease of over 25 per cent, in the member- 
ship, and that there has been an insurance 
clause under contemplation for the benefit 
of the members. New commodious quarters, 
where social reunions may be held by mem- 
bers of the association and their friends, are 
now provided at 26 E. 20th St. In these 
new rooms recreation, such as billiards, 
progressive euchre, whist, etc., may be in- 
dulged in and there are facilities by which 
buyers may procure meals. 


The Bowden Rings 

ARE COMPLETE IN VARIETY, CORRECT IN 
QUALITY AND PERFECT IN FINISH. VE 
MAKE EVERY VARIETY OF FINGER RINGS. 

J. B. BOWDEN & CO., 

I Maiden Lane. NEW YORK. 


February 20, 1901. 


THE JEWELERS’ CIRCULAR- WEEKLY. 


17 


Three Men Relieve Jeweler E. D. Thomas 
of a Wallet of Precious Stones. 

San Antonio, Tex., Feb. 14. — E. D. 
Thomas, a jeweler of E. Houston St, this 
city, was yesterday robbed of a wallet con- 
taining 40 unset diamonds, ranging in 
weight from J karat to T32 karat, and a lot 
of opals and half pearls. The total value of 
the stolen goods will reach |1,500. The rob- 
bery was committed in broad daylight, 
and is best described in the words of 
Mr. Thomas, who said to The Circular- 
Weekly correspondent: 

“Three days ago an elderly man, weigh- 
ing about 140 pounds, came into the store 
and asked to see some plated collar buttons. 
These goods were in a rear show case, on 
the right-hand side of the store and very 
close to a safe in which valuable jewelry, 
money and unset precious stones were kept. 
The old man bought a collar button, paying 
25 cents for it, and left the store. He came 
back afterwards and looked at other goods, 
but made no purchase and left again. Yes- 
terday, just after 12 o’clock two well 
dressed young men of very genteel appear- 
ance entered the store and asked me to 
show them some silk umbrellas ; and im- 
mediately afterward the same old man who 
had bought the gold plated collar button en- 
tered the store. I was engaged near the 
front of the store showing the first two 
men an umbrella, and paid but little atten- 
tion to the old man, who sauntered to the 
back end of the room. When he was well 
back, one of the men whom I was serving 
said : 

“ ‘This seems to be a good umbrella,’ and 
he opened it so that it was between me and 


the old man at the back part of the house. 
I did not like this action and I looked from 
behind the open umbrella just in time to 
see the old man step from behind the end 
of the counter near the safe. Just at this 
moment one of the men in front asked : 

“‘What is this set of jewelry worth?’ 
and as I turned to answer the old man 
walked forward and said : 

“ ‘You seem to be busy now, and I will 
drop in later.’ 

“The old man then walked out, going 
west on Houston St. The other two men 
soon left. As soori as they left, I we.nt back 
to the safe and discovered that the wallet 
containing the unset diamonds, opals and 
half pearls was gone. I immediately asked 
my jeweler, who was at work in a back 
room, if he had taken the wallet out of the 
safe, and he replied that he had not. I im- 
mediately sent an alarm of the robbery to 
police headquarters.” 

The police are working on the case, and 
as Mr. Thomas was able to give good de- 
scriptions of the three men, their chances of 
arrest are considered good. 


Jeweler J. B. Barnes in a Duel. 

Castle Rock, Wash., Feb. 9. — La^t 
Wednesday evening people were startleJ 
by the report of eight shots being fired 
in rapid succession. Upon investigation it 
was found that the shooting was done by 
J. B. Barnes and Harry Lovell, each with 
a 38-calibre revolver firing at the other .it 
close range. Barnes fired five shots and 
Lovell three. 

Lovell had been rooming at the Barnes 



Barrettes in all Styles. 


Weillustrate 
one novelty, 

Barrettes 

AND 

HAIR CL&SPS 

from fS2. 50 t' > 
J® 1 5.00 doz. 


Send for selec- 

tion of latest de- No. 99. Sterling, each $1. TO. 
signs. Roman, Rose or Green Kinbh. 

CHAS. L. TROUT & CO. 

5 & 7 Malden Lane. New York. 

Gold Goods and Filled Goods. 


Staple 
Patterns and 
Novelties. 


SILK FOBS, 

Ladies’ or 
Gent>’. 


FAN CHAINS. 


Hearts, 
Brooches, 
Cuff Links, 
Bracelets, 
Lorgnette 
Chains. 


Ribbon Spikes, 
Sterling Silver 

8 4c. doz. Up. 


New York, U. S. A., Birmingham, England, 

No. 100 William Street. King Alfred’s Place. 


Liege, Belgium, 

Boulevard D’Avroy, 118. 


London, England, 

No. 34 Holborn Viaduct. 


SAM’L BUCKLEY & CO., 

Commission Merchants. 

We beg to announce that we have opened an office at No. 34 Holborn Viaduct, 
London, E. C., England, for the convenience of American purchasers of EUROPEAN 
SILVERWARE, Cl.OCKS, POTTERIES, PRECIOUS STONES, ETC. 

The situation of this office (corner of Holborn Viaduct and Holborn Circus) 
affords an unobstructed north light that is unequaled in the district for the examina- 
tion of DIAMONDS AND PRECIOUS STONES. 

At our New York office, No. 100 William Street, we have designs and representa- 
tive pieces of silver and silver plate (reproductions of old Sheffield styles), manufactured 
by such houses as Wm. Comyns & Sons, Hukin & Heath and Wm. Hutton & Sons, for 
whom we act as sole United States agents. 

We are also sole agents for the silver and metal work made by the London Guild 
of Handicraft, under the supervision of C. R. Ashbee. 

SAM’L BUCKLEY .& GO. 



THE JEWELERS’ CIRCULAR-WEEKLY. 


February 20, 1901. 


Hair Clasps 


or 


Barrettes. 

We have a large line and 
are continually adding new 
patterns. 

We have all prices to retail 


from 


25c. to $1.50. 


Brooches 
and Hat Pins. 

A complete new line of 
all the latest styles will 
strengthen your Springstock. 

Watch for our line or send 
a postal for samples. 

Codding & Heilborn Co., 

Manufacturers, 

NORTH ATTLEBORO, MASS. 


Sample Office, 

CHAS. VAN NESS, 1 1 Maiden Lane, 

NEW YORK. 


home and Mr. Barnes thought he had 
reasons to believe that improper relations 
existed between Lovell and Mrs. Barnes. 
After the shooting Lovell was found in a lot. 
He had been shot in the left leg. the tibia be- 
ing broken. His coat showed that four bul- 
lets had passed through it in various 
places, but there were no wounds of im- 
portance to his person except the one m 
the leg. IMrs. Barnes fell in the wagon 
track in the alley from a wound in the hip. 
Barnes escaped uninjured. The wounded 
were carried to their homes and medical 
aid was summoned. 

J. B. Barnes is a jewefer of this place 
and is well and favorably known. Harry 
Lovell is comparatively a stranger here. 


Second Hold-Up at Caplan & Teplitz’s 
Store Succeeds. 

Pittsburgh, Pa., Feb. 15. — ^Another at- 
tempt at robbery, and this time a success- 
ful one, was made on the store of Caplan 
& Teplitz, Monessen, Pa., on Feb. 14. It 
appears that as Samuel Caplan, not Mr. 
Teplitz, as was at first reported, was re- 
turning to the store after he had locked 
up for the evening, having forgotten a 
handkerchief, he found himself confronted 
by three men as he stepped inside the 
door. The lights from the street reflected 
on the barrels of three revolver^ leveled 
at his head. 

“Throw up your hands and make no 
noise or we will blow your block off,” 
said one of the robbers in a low voice. 
Caplan complied with the request. “Now, 
open up the safe and get a move on you,” 
said the leader. Caplan opened the safe 
and one of the thieves lighted a match to 
see which box contained the valuables 
they wanted. They selected a box con- 
taining diamond rings valued at $650, and 
told the jeweler to put the other “trash” 
back in the safe. 

One of the robbers then kept Caplan 


covered with a gun while the others 
opened the back door. He then slowly 
backed to the doorway, keeping Caplan 
covered. When the thieves disappeared 
from the doorway Caplan rushed after 
them and fired several times at the re- 
treating forms, but his aim was wild and 
the shots were not returned. Caplan’s 
shots brought a large crowd of excited 
citizens to his store and the police arrived 
there within a short time after the rob- 
bery. The town was scoured for the rob- 
bers, but no trace of them was found. 

thorough investigation of the robbery 
is being made. 


Boston Jewelers’ Club Elect Officers for 
Ensuing Year. 

Boston, Mass., Feb. 1*3. — Thirty mem- 
bers and friends of the Boston Jewelers’ 
Club were present at Young’s Hotel last 
evening, the occasion being the annual 
meeting and election of officers for the 
year 1901. 

The officers for the ensuing year are; 
Arthur H. Pray, president; William A, 
Thompson, vice-president; C. O. Lawton, 
secretary and treasurer, and H. B. Burn- 
ham, E. W. Martin and William C. Wales, 
directors. 

Brief addresses were made by president 
A. H. Pray, H. W. Patterson and D. C. 
Percival. The next meeting will be held 
at the Waldorf-Astoria. 


Charles P. White, for several years head 
workman in the jewelry store of his 
brother, the late E. B. White, Houlton, 
Me., is soon to open business in Merritt’s 
brick block, Houlton. 

The bankrupt stock of the Western Jew- 
elry Co., Cripple Creek, Col., was re- 
cently sold at auction at their store, 175 E. 
Bennett Ave. The sale continued until the 
entire stock was sold. 


.LI- 


i 

,1 

.1 


4 

.1 

.1 

■t 

X 

X 

i 

X 

X 

X 

X 

X 

i 

X 

X 

It 


t 

West Silver Co., = Taunton, Mass., 



MANUFACTURERS OF THE 


I 

T 

I 

i 

T 
T 
T 
T 

t 

1 

t 

T 
T 

t 

I 
¥ 
I 

f 

T 


F. B. ROGERS BRAND 

OF SILVERWARE. 

Heavily plated on extra hard White metal. 

JWeW and attractive designs. 

“Bright prices. 

QUICK SHIPMENTS. 

Send for Catalogue. 

Boston Office, 67 Chauncy Street. New York Office, 80 Chambers Street. 


2055 — HOKSKRADISH. 




P*:»Kriiprv 20. 1901. 


THE JEWELERS’ CIRCULAR-WEEKLY. 


WHITING & DAVIS, 

Manufacturers, 

PLAINVILLE, MASS. 

NEW YORK OFFICE, 14 JOHN STREET. 


New Goods for the New 

Wc have added considerably to our line of 

Chatelaine Bags 
and Purses, 

and are keeping up 
our reputation for 


HANDUKD BY 
BKADING 
JOBBERS. 


Year. 


Style, Finish, 
(Vori^manship and 


*BJght Prices. 

It is acknowledged the most 
complete and satisfactory line 
in the market. 




(Utntcr Banquet 

At the Trocadero, Providence, R. 1., 

Evening of February 15, 1901. 


Providen'CE. R. I.. Feb. 16. — The execu- 
tive officers of the reorpranized New Eng- 
land Manufacturing Jewelers’ and Silver- 
smiths’ .Association covered themselves 
with glor>- last evening when the Winter 
banquet of that organization took place at 
the Trocadcro. the most elegant assembly 
hall in this city. The event was not only 
the largest and most successful ever held 
in this section of the country by any asso- 
ciation of jewelers, but may safely he set 
down as one of the most notable functions 
of the sort that have taken place in Provi- 
dence in recent years. 

Nearly 4u0 members and guests assem- 
bled for the exchange of social greetings in 
the Trocadero parlors and an hour later sat 
down to the sumptuous feast under which 
the eight long tables groaned in the ban- 
queting hall above. It was a big and jolly 
crowd, for the officers and members of the 
association were everj’where in evidence, 
spreading broadcast the hearty good-fellow- 
ship for which jewelers are famous, and 
making everybody welcome and at home. 

It was but a few minutes after 7.30 
o’clock, the hour scheduled for the banquet 
to begin, when the line was formed and the | 
members and guests marched up the grand i 
staircase to the banquet hall. Chairman j 
George H. Grant of the executive com- ; 
mittee. who acted .-.s master of ceremonies, j 
led the way, followed by Lieutenant-Gov- 
ernor Kimball on the arm of president 
Frank T. Pearce. The other honored guests 
•ind speakers of the evening — Hon. \\ alter 
B. Vincent, president of the Board of Al- 
dirmen; George II. Peet. president of the 
Providence Board of Trade; Edwacd G. 
Bucklnnd. Rhode Island representative of 
the New York. New 
Haven and Hartford 
Railroad ; Hon. George 
.A. Littlefield, Repre- 
sentative from Provi- 
dence in the General 
•A-sembly; Rev. L. L. 
Henson, pastor of the 
Cranston .Street Bap- 
tist Church — were es- 
corted by the officers 
of the association — vice- 
president;. O. C. Dever- 
■ ux and A. ,A. Bushee, 
ecretary S. A. Bald- 
win, trea.surer S. H, 
.Manchester, S. O. Big- 
ney and Ro w. !l C. 
Smith, of the executive 
;ommitti-. Theodore 


Foster, J. Perry Carpenter and | 
Charles M. Robbins, of the member- 
ship committee, and John M. Buffinton, 
William C. Greene and Nathan B. Barton, 
of the advisory committee. 

At the conclusion of the dinner, during 
which an excellent musical programme was 
rendered by the Glcnham orchestra, presi- 
dent Frank T. Pearce arose to inaugurate 
the after-dinner exercises, making a brief 
address, in which he gave a short account 
of the growth of the organization from a lit- 
tle jewelers’ club, formed some 20 years ago. 



FRANK T. PEARCE, 

PRESIDENT. 


PRESIDENT Pearce's remarks. 

Since that time it seemed as though there were 
not much strength in the organization at times, 
and as though the Manufacturing Jewelers’ Asso- 
ciation of New England did not amount to very 
much. But recently we looked abroad and saw 
in the other great cities the jewelers’ associations 
I having their annual banquets, which were affairs 
i of importance, and we felt that here in Providence 
and the Attleboros we ought to be able to support 
an organization of jewelers that would be second 
to none in the country. Our officers have looked 
the field over and studied the requirements for 
making our association representative of the jew- 
elry trade of the whole country. A year ago we 
had a membership of only 49, .and hardly half of 
them manufacturing jewelers, while now we have 
a membership of over 200. Rut we want to go 
onward. Let that be our watchword until we have 
made all of the jewelers of this section members 
of our association. There are other reasons than 
the social element why they should be with us, but 
I will leave that to the other speakers who are to 
follow me. 

President Pearce referred to the faithful 
^ work of the committee on the new constitu- 
tion and by-laws, which were adopted at the 
! annual meeting, in January, and which have 
' been already described in these columns. 


and spoke briefly of the more essential 
changes contained therein. After giving 
thanks to the members of the executive 
committee for arranging for the delightful 
dinner which all had enjoyed, he introduced 
as the toastmaster of the evening Hon. 
George A. Littlefield, whom he referred to 
as one whose wit and wisdom had often 
been heard by the members of the associa- 
tion and who was no stranger to them. 

ADDRESS OF HON. G. A. LITTLEFIELD. 

I think that we shall all admit that we have had 
a delightful evening up to this point. Now let us 
all conspire to have a delightful evening for the 
rest of the time we shall be here by giving our 
best attention to the speakers who have honored us 
with their presence. 

I don’t know why I should have been selected 
to act as your toastmaster this evening. Your ex- 
cellent president could have done it’ just as well. 
But since you have seen fit to choose me I will 
do the best I can, and thank you for the honor 
you have done me. 

It seems to me fitting that this corporation, which 
means so much to the State of Rhode Island, 
should first recei\-e the greetings of the State. It 
gives me pleasure to introduce to you a man who 
embodies as much as any statesman I know that 
intellectual independence we must all admire, typi- 
fied by the heroic figure of the “Independent Man” 
which surmounts the great dome of our marble 
capitol — his honor the Lieutenant-Governor, Charles 
Dean Kimball. 

ADDRESS OF LIEUTENANT-GOt’ERNOR C. D. 

KIMBALL. 

The Lieutenant-Governor spoke very 
briefly, his remarks being in substance as 
follows : 

It is hardly necessary for me to say that the 
State of Rhode Island is honored by your invita- 
tion to send a representative to this dinner. The 
material welfare of the State depends upon the 
nrosperity of its business men. There is no class 
of men in the State more important than the men 
in the business represented by this Association. Of 
course, many of you present are not of Rhode 
Island, but your interests'are the same as ours. 

I do not wish to detain you with extended re- 
marks. and will therefore call to your attention 
but a single matter for your consideration — a 
characteristic of the government of the State — 
and that is that the State officers here are elected 
annually. This is probably in accordance with the 
custom of the early days, when it \vas possible for 
men of business to aljtend to political affairs. Now. 
we 'men of business find that we must give our 
entire attention to ouf business or have some one 
attend to it for us. Frequent elections and political 
agitation are for this re.nson undesirable. In busi- 
ness we must have men of experience, and so it 
should be in affairs of government. We should 
not forget that ours is one of the few States in 
the Union that elect their officers annually. In 
other States they are elected for terms of from two 
to four years. 

The toastmaster announced that invita- 
tions to attend the banquet had been sent to 
all the members of the Rhode Island dele- 
gation in Congress, and that he was in re- 
ceipt of a telegram from Senator Nelson W. 




February 20, 1901. 


THE JEWELERS’ CIRCULAR-WEEKLY. 


21 


Aldrich and letters from Senator George 
Peabody Wetmore and Representative Mel- 
ville Bull, expressing their regret that 
pressure of public business prevented their 
acceptance. Representative Adin B. Capron 
had fully expected to be present, but at the 
last moment learned that he also would be 
unable to do so. In introducing the next 
speaker, Mr. Littlefield said : 

“I suppose it is not impossible to think 
of Providence as a rich jewel in the setting 
of New England, and in this connection I 
am reminded of the old saying that there is 
but one jewel that we can carry with us 
into the future world — the jewel of wis- 
dom. Now that we have heard from the 
Representative of the State of Rhode Island, 
it is proper that we should hear from the 
city of Providence, and I, therefore, take 
great pleasure in introducing a gentleman 
well known to us for his rare, judicial, dis- 
cretionary wisdom — Hon. Walter B. Vin- 
cent, president of the Board of Aldermen.” 



S. O. BIGNEY, 

MEMBF.R, EXECUTIVE COMMITTEE. 

Alderman Vincent said in part : 

ADDRESS OF ALDERMAN W. B. VINCENT. 

Mr. Toastmaster and Gentlemen : I trust you 
will excuse me if I do not pronounce the whole 
name of your Association, for the hour is already 
drawing late and there are several speakers still 
whom I know you are anxious to hear. 

This is one of the evenings when, if you will 
pardon a reference to a song that has gained some 
popularity, there seems to be a little taken off the 
top. • I would remind the Lieutenant-Governor that 
he is not at the top of the heap, but if he will 
wait a little while we will fix that all right. 

A little time ago I had the pleasure of addressing 
in this hall the Nobles of the Mystic Shrine. I 
thought that was a pretty lively time. 

(Voice from a farther side of the hall; “They 
ain’t in it.’’) 

Mr. Vincent — I think the gentleman has antici- 
pated the remark I was about to make. 

Gentlemen, the city of Providence will be glad 
to appreciate you if you will only appreciate the 
beauties of our city a little. It is customary to 
answer when a man from another city asks, “What 
do you do in Providence?” “Why, Providence is 
at the head of the jewelry trade of all the world.” 
Seriously speaking, however, there is nothing like 
an association of this character for men of busi- 
ness. It is an advantage to you in your business. 
I think you will agree with me that it is an ad- 
vantage to you to be able to associate yourselves 
together in this social way. It is well enough to 
say that “business is business,” but that is a theory 
that may be carried too far. The very way in 
which you meet one another in your places of busi- 
ness is important. I am glad to learn that your 
association is so prosperous as I learn from your 
president that it is, and I trust I may meet these 
gentlemen before me again. 

The next speaker introduced by Mr. Lit- 
tlefield was S. O. Bigney, the toastmaster 
remarking that after remarks from repre- 
sentatives of the State and the city, it wouid 
be pleasing to hear from a member of the 


Association itself, and he would therefore 
introduce a gentleman who was a member 
of the executive committee and who was 
chairman of the tariff committee appointed 
by the Association about a year ago to rep- 
resent the interests of the New England 
manufacturers before the committee at 
Washington. Mr. Bigney said in part : 
ADDRESS BY S. O. BIGNEY. 

Mr. Toastmaster and Gentlemen : I will take up 
but a moment of your time, as the hour is getting 
late. The subject which has been assigned to me 
is perhaps not very interesting to all of you, but 
it ought to be, for it is intimately connected with 
your interests and your welfare. You will re- 
member that at our last annual banquet we passed 
resolutions condemning the French treaty. Your 
tariff committee did hard work and their work 
was so effective at Washington that the French 
Minister issued a circular in which he said that 
the New England jewelers were unnecessarily 
alarmed, and that the proposed reciprocity treaty 
would really be to their interests. Your tariff 
committee obtained a copy of M. Gambon’s circular 
and answered it so conclusively as to show that we 
knew more of our interests than did M. Gambon. 
Shortly afterward all action on the treaty was 



GEORGE H. GRANT, 


MEMBER, EXECUTIVE COMMITTEE. 

postponed for one year. Some time ago we were 
informed by the daily press, on what authority I 
don’t know, that the treaty had died a natural 
death, but we have learned within a few weeks 
that it is likely to come up again. Therefore it 
is necessary that we continue our work against it. 
We well know that a reduction of the tariff rates 
will be detrimental to our interests. 

Now, this treaty is not a Democratic measure, 
but, strangely enough, it is a Republican one and 
has been signed by a Republican President. I 
think we ought to place ourselves on record 
against it, and have therefore prepared a resolution 
which I will read : 

‘‘At our last annual banquet this organization 
passed a resolution condemning the French 
reciprocity treaty and asking our Congressmen to 
defeat it. A short time afterward the said treaty 
was postponed for one year, and we believe that in 
a short time it will be presented for ratification. 
Therefore be it 

“Resolved, That it is the sense of the New Eng- 
land Manufacturing Jewelers’ and Silversmiths’ 
Association, representing 50,000 people, that the 
passage of the French treaty, so-called, will work 
great injury not only to the manufacturers of jew- 
elry and kindred trades, but also to thousands of 
employes as well, and they honestly believe and 
assert that the French treaty should not become 
a law, and that said representatives be requested 
to do all in their power to defeat said treaty; 
therefore be it further 

“Resolved. That the secretary of the New Eng- 
land Manufacturing Jewelers’ and Silversmiths’ 
Association shall transmit to President McKinley 
and each and every member of Congress a copy 
of these resolutions.” 

Mr. Bigney moved the adoption of the 
above, and the motion was seconded by 
Charles M. Robbins, who is also a member 
of the tariff committee. The president re- 
marked that the matter would come before 
the board of governors for action and would 
undoubtedly be adopted, but he would like 


to get the sense of the Association by an 
aye and no vote. The result was a unani- 
mous vote in favor of the resolutions. Con- 
tinuing, Mr. Bigney said : 

I think this industry has been made a political 
football long enough. The matter of the tariff 
ought to be taken out of politics and put in the 
hands of a life commission. You well know that 
for two years out of every four we are on the 
anxious seat. It seems to me a reflection on the 
intelligence of the citizens of this country to allow 
the tariff matter to remain in the hands of poli- 
ticians. All sections of the country should be al- 
lowed to send committees to represent their in- 
terests before a commission at Washington. You 
will find the Tariff League and the Home Market 
Club of Boston in line, and the matter can be 
taken out of the hands of the political parties. I 
have another resolution which I would like to offer. 

Mr. Bigney read the following resolution, 
which President Pearce later said would 
also be considered by the board of gov- 
ernors of the Association ; 

"Resolved, That the New England Manufactur- 
ing Jewelers’ and Silversmiths’ Association be- 
lieve that the time has come for the removal of the 
vexed tariff question from politics and placing 



ROSWELL C, SMITH, 

MEMBER, EXECUTIVE COMMITTEE. 

the same in the hands of a permanent commission, 
made up of statisticians whose duty it shall be 
to investigate and ascertain the difference between 
the cost in this country and all foreign countries, 
and that difference between the cost in this coun- 
try and the lowest foreign cost shall be the mini- 
mum rate of duty placed on all goods imported 
into this country which come into direct competi- 
tion with home production. Be it further 

“Resolved, That the various industries shall se- 
lect a delegate and that said various delegates 
from the different industries shall receive a hear- 
ing before this Board or Commission prior to any 
change made in the established tariff rates, etc.” 

President George H. Peet, of the 
Providence Board of Trade, was intro- 
duced as the representative of the oldest 
business men’s association in Providence. 
Mr. Peet’s address was 
short but to the point. 

GEORGE H. feet’s ADDRESS. 

The Providence Board of 
Trade has done a 
great work in this com- 
munity. I think it will do 
more and better work in the 
future, and of course we ex- 
pect you to help us. You 
represent one of the most 
important industries of tne 
State. You have made Prov- 
idence famous, as something 
else has made Milwaukee 
famous. 

I have no doubt that 
when old Roger Williams 
landed on Fox Point he was 
met by some aborigine drum- 
mer from Attleboro with 
Providence nose rings in his 
nose, who no doubt sold Mr. 

Williams a very large bill of 
goods. 



THE JEWELERS’ CIRCULAR-WEEKLY. February 20, 1901. 




February 20, 190]. 


THE JEWELERS’ CIRCULAR-WEEKLY. 


23 


Now, what benefits your Association benefits 
ours. Our interests are mutual. The more 
prosperity there is the more shirt waists will be 
sold, and the more jewelry will be required for 
them. The textile industry and the jewelry trade 
will be benefited together. 

Two great events were scheduled for to-night: 
a heavy-weight boxing match and' a jewelers’ ban- 
quet — brawn in Cincinnati and brains in Provi- 
dence. But the heavy-weight boxing match has 
been declared off, while here we are. All of which 
goes to show the superiority of brains over brawn. 
And speaking of boxing reminds me of Terry Mc- 
Govern, who is like Rhode Island in one respect: 
he is the biggest little thing that ever happened. 

Mr. Littlefield in introducing the next 
speaker, E. G. Buckland, said : “Provi- 
dence is fortunate in having within her 
borders a sort of deputy president of 
the Consolidated road. It has been said 
that if the officers of the Consolidated un- 
derstood their business as their legal rep- 
resentative in this State did, it would be 
better for all concerned. He is a com- 
paratively new comer here, and perhaps 
will tell us of his impressions of Rhode 
Island.” Mr. Buckland’s speech was a 
gem, sparkling with wit and eloquence. 
Among some of the good things he said 
were the following: 

After the very flattering introduction your toast- 
master has given me, I feel somewhat as Uncle 
Remus said “Brer Fox” did after falling into the 
honey bees’ hive: he wasn’t just bedaubed with 
honey, but he was “civered” with it. When I was 
asked to speak to you here I agreed to do so on 
condition that I shouldn’t have to talk shop. 

I was told when I came to Rhode Island I would 
find it a very narrow State, but, gentlemen, I came 
from Connecticut. I remember a certain com- 
mercial traveler who got off the train at Litch- 
field one day to go to a place he was told was three 
miles away. He got a farmer to drive him to the 
place, and they drove and drove. Finally he 
asked the farmer, “Aren’t your miles pretty long 
here in Connecticut?” and the farmer replied, 
“Gosh, they have to be; they are so durned nar- 
row.” 

I was told that coming as the representative of 
the railroad I would find myself in a den of lions. 
I always had sympathy for Daniel, but he had the 
advantage of me. He could say to the lions, “Now, 
gentlemen, if there is going to be any after-dinner 
speaking you’ll have to count me out.” 

I came here about the time of the Spanish war, 
and I cannot forget the readiness, the enthusiasm 
and the patriotism with which you made your 
preparations for participating in the conflict. 
When I remember the noble lives of Gen. Na- 
thaniel Greene, Com. Oliver Hazard Perry, Gen. 
Ambrose K. Burnside and the many other heroes 
from this State, I can readily understand that the 
blood that flowed through their veins is living to- 
day in the veins of their descendants and asso- 
ciates here. There has been no holding back in 
Rhode Island, no consulting of selfish interests in 
considering the question of carrying out the indi- 
cations of our manifest destiny. And I may say 
here, though it is perhaps foreign to my subject, 
that there can be no turning back from the conse- 
quences which have followed Dewey’s sailing into 
Manila Bay. I believe, as has been said, that there 
was but one thing worse that he could have done, 
and that was to 
have sailed away. 
There has not 
been a moment 
froin that time to 
this* day when the 
country could 
have turned aside 
from the course 
it has pursued. 
And the same re- 
lations obtain with 
respect to the 
Nicaragua treaty. 
A nation can’t 
break its word 
any more than an 
individual can 
break his word; 
its . responsibility 
increases in pro- 
portion as it is an 
aggregation of in- 
dividuals. 

As I came to 
Rhode Island I 


found it a State made famous in the national legis- 
lature. This State is represented in the halls of Con- 
gress as no other State in the Union is repre- 
sented. This State -does, through its senior Sen- 
ator. dictate in a large measure the destinies of 
this Union. 

As to the railroad company, I find the Golden 
Rule a good thing to work under. We wish to 
treat you honestly, and we believe you will treat 
us in the same spirit. 

Rev. L. L. Henson, the last speaker, 
was introduced as another new comer to 
Rhode Island, a man who came here from 
the State of Abraham Lincoln’s nativity. 
Mr. Henson’s remarks were in part as 
follows: 

I am glad thus early to have the privilege of 
meeting this body of men. I believe in men and 
I believe in meeting men as a man. Some one 
has said that people are divided into men, women 
and preachers, but I protest against that classifi- 
cation. I am glad of this opportunity of meeting 
you on the broad platform of manhood. We are 
mutually dependent upon each other. Rev. E. E. 
Hale said at the college a few days ago that the 
man oiling his reaper in Dakota was helping to 
answer the prayer of the woman in Scotland when 
she asked God to give her her daily bread. It is 
a beautiful thought. We are all workers together. 
In so far as we do the work we are fitted to do 
we are working out God’s purpose, whether we 
manufacture jewelry or sermons. You know the 
best man in the world is the man who can do the 
most for others. Let us go away to-night with that 
thought. 

Toastmaster Littlefield then read the 
following extract from the letter of regret 
received from former-Governor Elisha 
Dyer: 

With so many gifted speakers you will hardly 
miss me, but if you will allow me I should like to 
present to the Association this little gem of Eng- 
lish writing applicable to the craft: 

“The manufacture of jewels has in all times 
been a test of the artistic powers of a nation; for, 
being intended only for personal adornment, the 
genius of the jeweler has been directed to the pro- 
duction of the largest amount of beauty in the 
most limited space.” 

To you gentlemen, workers of gold and silver, 
used every day to the companionship of the cost- 
liest metals and the choicest gems, the calling itself 
may have become a mere matter of business, but 
to us on the outside, however, who recognize the 
clever ingenuity, the refined taste and the marvel- 
ous adaptation of beautiful ideas, the trade seems 
to be unlimited in its ability to bring forth form 
after form of unending beatity. 

From the letter of President Faunce, of 
Brown University, who said that only his 
absence in Florida prevented his atten- 
dance at the banquet, Mr. Littlefield read 
the following extract: 

I regard it as very important that the industry 
and the education of New England should keep in 
vital contact, in order that education may become 
more practical and that industry may be lifted 
to the highest level. Particularly in the work of 
jewelers and silversmiths, which has given the 
State of Rhode teland a reputation throughout the 
world, is there need of thorough training in the 
art of design, and the wide knowledge of the best 
art of the ancient and modern world. I hope to 
see the day when we shall not be obliged to look 
to Europe for our best designers or our best tech- 
nical education, but when our American schools 
shall give all the training that our American in- 
dustries demand. 

After President Pearce had extended 
thanks on behalf of the Association to Mr. 
Littlefield for the able and dignified man- 
ner in which he had conducted the office 
of toastmaster, the evening came to a 
close near the midnight hour with the 
singing of “Auld Lang Syne.” 

In making the preliminary arrange- 
ments for the banquet the appointment 
of special committees was dispensed with, 
the work of preparation being performed 
by the executive committee, the members 
of which are George H. Grant, S. O. Big- 
ney and Roswell C. Smith, with the active 
assistance of the president and other exe- 





Most Compact 

AND THINNEST 
DUST-PROOF 

Open-Face Gold Case 

MADE IN THE WORLD 
FOR 

AMERICAN MOVEMENTS. 

Made in all shapes, engine turned, 
engraved or plain. 



Colby Patent, April 24, 1894. 

{ DuboisWatchGaseGo., 


I 21-23 Maiden Lane, N. Y. 




America’s Leading Art and 
Jewelry Auctioneer, 



Dan I. Murray. 

Twenty years’ experi- 
ence in the Wholesale, 
Retail, Manufacturing 
and Importing Jewelry 
Business. 


I have never failed to move a stock. I 
work on commission. My methods are new 
and original. 

WRITE ME EOR TERMS, Etc. 

126 State St., Room 602, Chicago, III. 
No. 3 Maiden Lane, Room 61, New York. 

AT PRESENT SELLING FOR E. L. CUENDET, 21 
JOHN ST., NEW YORK, large importer of Musical 
Boxes and French Bfic-a-Brac. 


For the next two weeks, address my New York office. 


AMERICAN PEARLS 

and baroques bought for cash or sold on 
commission. Correspondence solicited. 
Established i88o. 

We also make a nice line of baroque pearl 
jewelry for the trade. 

CHAS. S. CROSSMAN & CO., 

3 Malden Eane, New York. 


24 


THE JEWELERS’ CIRCULAR-WEEKLY. 


February 20, 1901. 


cutive ofticers of the .Association. Air. 
Grant made a most efficient master of 
ceremonies, directing the work of the 
caterer, the orchestra and the .Apollo 
Quartette with such skill and discretion 
that everything passed off with the most 
perfect smoothness. 

notes on the Banquet. 

XoboJy had to ask where George Dover and his 
party were — after two or three wine courses had 
been disposed of. His magnificent tenor voice 
was heard frequently leading the songs, in which 
the whole company joined with the orchestra. 

One of the largest house parties was that com- 
posed of the guests of Roswell C. Smith, seated 
at the head of Table E, nearly all influential in 
municipal affairs. The party included J. William 
Moore, Beverly S. Lake and Thomas H. Leonard, 
fellow members with Mr. Smith in the City Coun- 
cil; city editor J. J. Rosenfeld, of the Providence 
Journal; council clerk D. F. Hayden, Linus .\rm- 
strong. Ed, T. Mulchahey and A. G. Van Houten, 
of New York. 

George Grant’s party was one of the merriest in 
the hall. The party included Henry .V. Carpenter, 

S. J. Briggs, Hon. Henry R. Barker, Hon. W^ A. 
H. Grant, Hon. Clarence A. Aldrich and W illiam 

T. Braitsch, the latter Mr. Grant’s business part- 
ner. 

The oflneers of the Ostby & Barton Co. formed 
a pleasant party of their own. They were: , En- 
glehardt C. Ostby, president; N. B. Barton, treas- 
urer; Arthur Ostby, superintendent, and Frederick 
Carr, secretary. 

Walter Burdick, James Campbell and George 
Williams were present as the guests of O. C. 
Devereux. 

Nobody had a better time at the banquet than 
Major Horton, of the Horton & Angell Co., and 
Capt. Ben. Hall, both old soldiers. 


President Pearce had the largest party of guests. 
They were his son, A. G. Pearce; W^alter W. 
Burnham, a friend prominent in the Masonic Or- 
der; W. H. Shedd, E. I. Rogers, C. C. Newhall, 
F. A. Chace, A. J. Ferguson and W. P. Vaughan. 

One of the most pleasing features of the evening 
was the singing, in which everybody joined on two 
or three occasions. “Marching Through Georgia’’ 
is a stirring chorus when sung by 360-odd voices. 
“How Dry I Am” was also quite strongly ren- 
dered, though there was no particular reason for 
the sentiment. 

The Apollo Quartette added to their already 
generous laurels by their fine singing, and the or- 
chestra played delightfully. Like everything con- 
nected with the affair, the musical features were 
strictly “all right.” 

M. N. Grasby, of La Crosse, Traced to 
Norway. 

L.\ CRftssK, AVis.. Feb. 13. — Word has 
W-en received here that M. N. Grasby, the 
jeweler of this city who extracted $4,000 
worth of jewelry, which had not been paid 
ff»r. from his store before leaving, has gone 
to Norway. Creditors are in charge of the 
remainder of his stock. His creditors main- 
tain that his conduct was criminal. 

Grasby left town over two weeks ago and 
the sheriff closed the store, Feb. 4, on a writ 
of attachment issued at the instance of A. 
Hirsch & Co. and M. S. Fleishman Co., Chi- 
cago creditors. Mr. Ness was left in charge 
of the store, but was ignorant as to where 
the proprietor went. McConnell & Schwei- 
zer, who represent the Chicago firms, state 
that their attachment covers the entire 
stock. 

Charles H. Becker, of Becker & Lath- 
rop, Syracuse, N. Y., left Monday for New 
York and Washington and two weeks’ duck 
shooting on Chesapeake Bay. 


Jlrrangemcnt of the Cables at Ulbich the Banqueters Sat. 


SPEAKE.RS’ TABLE. 


A 


B 



SPEAKERS’ TABLE. 


Frank T. Pearce 
Walter B. Vincent 
H. F. Carpenter 
S. O. Bigney 
Edward G. Buckland 
I'heodore W. Foster 
•Mbert A. Bushee 
O. C. Devereux 
Francello G. Jillson 
,S. A. Baldwin 
IL B. Manchester 
William C. Greene 
Rev. Llewellyn L. 
son 


Charles Dean Kimball 
George A. Littlefield 
George H. Peet 
Charles R. Stark 
J. Perry Carpenter 
J. M. Buffinton 
N. B. Barton 
George M. Williams 
Charles M. Robbins 
Silas H. Manchester 
H. F. Manchester 
E. Howard Wright 


Hen- 
TABLE A. 


George A. Bunton 


Arthur T. Cole 
Walter E. Paine 
Bernard Rothschild 
Henry E. Smith 
A. E. Codding 
W. C. Tappan 
Harry L. Allen 
W. F. Maintein 
•Vlpin Chisholm 

I. R. Palmer 
Herbert R. Lowe 
F. H. Cutler 

W. H. Grafton 
Thomas F. Arnold 
H. F. Tourtellot 
C. F. Barbour 
F. M. Ellis 
William G. Payton 

J. Parker Ford 
C. W. Battey 

< ieorge H. Allen 
Fred. L. Torrey 
L. W. Teed 


Fred. E. Kendall 
O. E. Case 
George B. Champlin 
J. L. Thompson 
J. S. Ashworth 
C. H. Tappan 

E. E. King 

G. Cheever Hudson 

F. J. Mills 

Roswell Blackinton, Jr. 
F. B. Bingham 
W'alter G. Brown 
Horace W. Steere 
F. V. Kennon 
Arthur S. Cumerford 

H. F. Lasell 

E. S. McLaughlin 
John F. Brady 
Andrew Morris 
W. H. Bell 
M. F. Williams 
J. T. Inman 
George H. Snell 


TABLE B. 


William Hart, Jr. 
Walter H. Woodmancy 
J. Allen Buffinton 
Hiram Howard 
Morton F. Winsor 
Horace E. Remington 
Horace Remington 
A. H. Bliss 
E. C. Bliss 
George Y. Hayward 
Clarke II. Johnson 
Major George A. Brug 
George Becker 
G. H. Niles 
Charles C. Dailey 
E. Elmer Blackinton 
S. S. Wild 
Charles E. Stanley 
Howard D. Wilcox 
Herbert M. Shove 
George C. McCormick 
E. L. Fuller 
E. A. Woodmancy 


H. J. Straker 
W. A. Walton 
Col. Isaac M. Potter 
Isa Winsor 
Albert A. Remington 
Clarence G. Remington 
Harvey Huestis 
F. H. Bliss 
Herbert L. Rhodes 
Edgar B. Logue 
F. B. Reynolds 
Joseph M. Metcalf 
William Bens 
John B. McGuinnef 
Edward T. Ettlinger 
George H. Taft 
F. W. Bloomer 

E. N. Slade 
Walter Gardiner 
Walter- A. Griffith 
H. S. Tanner 

F. S. Mills 
Sidney J. Straker 


TABLE C. 


W. M. Dailey 

Frederick W. Andrews William F. Kilkenney 
Col. Charles II. Williams Herbert M. Williams 


William W. Fisher 
Walter E. Hayward 
A. II. Paul 
Frank E. Allen 
Thomas H. Leonard 
T. J. Rosenfeld 
William Nerney 
A. G. Van Houten 
Edward I. Mulchahey 
Tames Srnith 
Joseph Finherg 

S. M. Einstein 
Carl Christensen 
Charles O. Sweet 
H. T. Regnell 
William F-. Rounseville 

T. B. Nichols 

E. D. Severance 


Charles B. Duckworth 
Charles C. Wilmarth 
Louis J. Lamb 
C. F. Swectland 
Beverly S. Lake 
Daniel F. Hayden 
W. II. Lamh 
T. William Moore 
Linus D. Armstrong 
C. L. Barrows 
Maurice T. Baer 
Howard T. Bates 
E. V. Sweet 
T. A. Bigney 
C. P. Keeler 
George L. Shepardson 
Frank H. Andrews 
A. S. Ingraham 


TABLE D. 


E. E. Culver Louis W. Clarke 

William IT. Mason R. Clvde L’Amoureux 
Walter B. Frost V^irgil Blackinton 

Samuel H. Cochrane Frederick G. Mason 


W. C. Jones 
W. H. Manchester 
Henry B. Richardson 
George R. Clarke 
H. H. Curtis 

R. B. Macdonald 

S. J. Greene 
Izri W. Lederer 
G. Eugene Fisher 
A. A. Stark 
Samuel E. Kelley 
L. P. Sturtevant 
E. A. Fa^o 
Major E. S. Horton 
Miles S. Carter 

E- J- Qvarnstrom 
A. R. Crosby 
James Campbell 
-\ugustus V. Payton 


Frank Mossberg 

M. L. Jacoby 

N. Justin Smith 
Charles E. Hancock 
C. H. Parker 

J. B. Richardson 
Irving R. Lederer 
Sigmund Lederer 
J. H. Tuttle 
C. B. Broome 
C. W. Greene 
W. A. Engley 
J. C. Cummings 
William H. Blake 
Edgar A. Remington 
A. I). Crosby 
W. A. Burdick 
Charles A. Eddy 


TABLE E. 


George H. Grant 
Stephen J. Briggs 
H. R. Barker 
Edwin G. Penniman 
W. J. Braitsch 
Arthur I. Harvey 
.“Vndrew J. Ferguson 
William P. \''aughn 
\V. N. Fisher 
H. B. Mead 
Charles F. Forrester 
Fred. L. Carpenter 
David Bernkopf 
J. Solinger 
R. G. Schutz 
E. H. Parsons 
A. S. Fraser 
Walter I. Smith 
George H. Heathcote 
Frank A. Chase 
A. B. Eddv 
W. H. Shedd 


Henry A. Carpenter 
Clarence A. Aldrich 
Walter W. Burnham 
W. A. Grant 
J. P. Burlingame 
Dr. \V. H. Carpenter 
.'Vldridge G. Pearce 
E. E. Thomas, Jr. 

D. E. Makepeace 

A. A. French 
William F. Almy 
Samuel K. Grover 
William F. Leeder 
William G. Currie 
-\dolph Lederer 

P. F. Parsons 

Dr. Charles W. Higgins 

B. A. Remington 
Thomas W. Lind 
John H. Newhall 
Charles C. Newhall 
Everett I. Rogers 


TABLE F. 


Charles S. Nightingale 
William P. Chapin 
William E. Copeland 
William A. Copeland 
Robert M. Hamilton 
F. C. Wilkinson 
George E. Darling 
Charles A. W'ilkinson 
F. H. Sadler 
C. J. McClatchey 
Edwin Leach 
John A. Straight 
C. L. Valentine 
Fritz L. Kraus 

C. A. Smith 

A. F. Blanchard 
H. Henius 
Beniamin Wyman 
Herbert L. Perry 
H. K. King 
J. G. Hutchinson 
A. I. Hutchinson 

D. A. White 
John Ward 
William Clark, Jr. 


Frederick D. Carr 
Arthur O. Ostby 
George H. Bunce 
Charles D. Waite 
George N. Kingsbury 
Henry C. Kraus 
E. B. Hough 
Schuyler Si. Coe 
Ezekiel Blake 

H. A. Clark 
Edwin F. Leach 
P. H. Conley 
William C. Lind 
P. Wunderle 
William I. Dunn 
J. J. White 
Herbert W. Gardner 
Nahum Perry 

C. F. Denison 
Joseph F. Lynch 

I. Frank Coupe 
Dr. W. M. Boothby 
Caleb George 

W. L. Bushee 


TABLE G. 


E. A. Mowry 
T. G Frothingham, Jr. 
C. M. Dunbar 
A. L. Blumenthal 
James Wallace 
Frank P. Eddy 
Tohn Kelso 
Harold J. Gross 
A. S. Vennerbeck 
George W. Dover 
Thomas Morris 

G. W. Hutchison 
Tohn W. Case 
William FI. Shackleport 
Egbert B. Shepard 
William Loeh 

Fred. W. Hall 
E. W. McAllister 
T. E. Nicholas 
T. Si. Fraser 

H. D. Baker 
Oscar E. Place 


T. G. Frothingham 
W. H. Garner 
Joseph L. Sweet 
Peter Idnd 
C. J. Heimberger 
Charles R. Bromley 
A. Henius 
/Vrthur C. Stone 
TIarrv !M. Mays 
W. C. Stevens 
Capt. Benjamin L. Hall 
Forre.st G. Eddy 
Hunter C. White 
Elton B. Fischer 
Louis Lvons 
Alfred Krower . 
Charles F. Irons 
Charles A. Russell 
N. B. Nick-erson 
Calvin Dean 
Adelhert E. Place 
George M. Baker 





February 20, 1901. 


THE JEWELERS’ CIRCULAR-WEEKLY. 


25 


Annual Meetings of Waterbury Corpora- 
tions. 

W.\TERBURV, Conn., Feb. 16. — Annual 
meetings of local corporations : 

The Holmes, Booth & Haydens Co. — 
Directors: E. C. Lewis, T. B. Kent, F. 

L. Adams, Edward Holbrook, F. H. 
Lovell, G. W. Burnham, J. J. Sinclair, S. 
W. Kellogg, D. Le Roy Dresser. Presi- 
dent and treasurer, T. B. Kent; vice-presi- 
dent, J. J. Sinclair; assistant treasurer, F. 
L. Adams; secretary, George H. Benham. 

The Benedict & Burnham Mfg. Co. — 
Directors: E. C. Lewis, E. L. Frisbie, Jr.; 

G. W. Burnham, A. M. Dickinson, J. Ho- 
bart Bronson, J. S. Elton, C. N. Way- 
land, H. L. Wade and D. L. Dresser. 
President and treasurer, E. L. Frisbie 
Jr.; assistant treasurer, G. W. Burnham; 
secretary, A. M. Dickinson. 

The New England Watch Co. — Direc- 
tors: E. L. Frisbie, Jr.; A. O. Jennings, 

H. S. Chase, J. S. Elton, E. C. Lewis, 
H. W. Scovill, J. H. Bronson, C. N. Way- 
land, D. L. Dresser and G. W. Burnham. 
President and treasurer, E. L. Frisbie, Jr.; 
secretary, A. O. Jennings. 

Waterbury Brass Co. — Directors: Fred- 
erick J. Kingsbury, James S. Elton, C. N. 
Wayland, H. H. Peck, Gilman C. Hill 
John P. Elton and Charles F. Brooker. 
President, James S. Elton; vice-president, 
Charles F. Brooker; treasurer, John P. 
Elton; secretary, Gilman C. Hill. 

Waterbury Clock Co. — Directors: Irv- 

ing H. Chase, G. M. Van Deventer, F. 
S. Chase, H. L. Wade, H. S. Chase. 
President, H. L. Wade; secretary and 
treasurer, Irving H. Chase. 


The Upson Jewelry ,Co. — Directors: W. 
D. Upson, Charles E. Hall and W. R. 
Upson. President and treasurer, W. D. 
Upson; secretary, Charles E. Hall. 


Jewelers Want to Know the Whereabouts 
of Oscar Lipman. 

S.\N Francisco, Cal., Feb. 13. — The police 
of this city are looking for Oscar Lipman, a 
jeweler whose office was in the Thurlow 
block and who is wanted to settle for about 
$1,800 worth of diamonds, watches and 
other articles which several prominent jew- 
elry firms claim is due them from him. For 
some time Lipman, who is a young man, 
had been engaged in the jewelry business in 
this city, where he enjoyed the confidence of 
the wholesale jewelers generally. He oper- 
ated extensively on the “memorandum” 
plan. 

It is stated at Aronson’s Loan Office that 
Lipman owed for nearly $1,500 worth of 
jewelry. Alphonse Judis, wholesale jew- 
eler, claims that Lipman has failed to ac- 
count for $200 due him, and Carrau & 
Green claim a debt of $80. Other firms in 
the jewelry business claim to hold bills 
against Lipman to the extent of about $200. 
Lipman’s relatives offered to settle his ac- 
counts for 50 cents on the dollar, but this 
offer was withdrawn later. 


George E. Hooper & Co. are conduct- 
ing an auction for R. L. Brough, St. 
Albans, Vt. 

J. U. Potts has removed his jewelry 
store at Oelwein, la., to a better location 
in the same town. 


THE BARLOW 



Triple Glass Shelf Fixture, showing 
guard railing; base, 9 inches diameter; 
plate-glass shelves, 14, l8 and 22 inches 
square. 

No. 574, price $17.00 each. Prices on 
other sizes on application. Send for 200- 
page catalogue and supplement. 

BARLOW MFG. CO., 

Holyoke, Mass. 

Boston Salesrooms, 125 Summer St. t 

T 






W1X35 It- WAL t ACB 

R ■w::a.llace • co 

I I T H •/*, 

W • • • CONKI* • ' 0 ^ 



“ 1835-R.WALLACE ” 

Stamped on an article of Silver=plated ware is a guarantee 
of worth and quality. 

Every dealer, when selecting a line of plated ware, 
always has in mind two leading qualities, and these usually 
are durability and design, as these are the ones on which 
most depends his reputation as a dealer in honest ware. 

Our goods are made of the highest grade of NicKel 
Silver, plated with FINE Silver. Our extra, or A 1 grade, 
is plated 20 per cent, heavier than the regular standard. 
Triple and sectional plates are also carried in stock. 

In designing patterns we endeavor to select only such 
as are graceful in outline and thoroughly artistic in deco= 
ration, and which conform most closely to the taste of a 
discriminating purchaser, which our long experience ena= 
hies us to do. 

Our line consists of the following patterns : Tipped, 

Fiddle, Windsor, Shell, Joan, Virginia, Astoria, Stuart and 
Anjou. 

Any dealer who is not already familiar with our line will 
find it much to his advantage to write for Catalogue and 
discounts. 


^c^on'es^WktmGFOKD, Conn. \( 

-BRANCHES'- \ 

226 5th. Ave., New 'York-131 Wabash Ave., Chicago^ 
120 J'utter St., S.T. - 63 Bajinghall Si.. London.!.^ 



26 


THE JEWELERS’ CIRCULAR-WEEKLY, 


February 20, 1901, 


HEADQUARTERS 



All Grades 
of 

Swiss 

Watches. 


CROSS ^ BECUELIN, 

17 MAIDEN LANE, NEW YORK. 


Train Robbers Secure a Valuable Pack- 
age of Watches, Etc. 

A quantity of watches, cases, move- 
ments, rings and a silver salad set, which 
were sent by express ov'er two weeks ago, 
in one large package, by William Morris 
& Co., jobbers, Philadelphia, Pa., ad- 
dressed to Joseph Fahys & Co., 54 Maiden 
Lane, New \ ork, fell into the hands of 
car robbers while in transit between the 
two cities. In spite of all the efforts of 
detectives, no trace of the missing prop- 
erty has been found.. The total value of 
the contents of the package was about 
$275. 

The goods were taken from a Pennsyl- 
vania Railroad express car between Tren- 
ton and New York early Sunday morn- 
ing, Feb. 3, and the loss will therefore fall 
on the express company unless their de- 
tectives succeed in recovering them. In 
the large package addressed to Joseph 
Fahys & Co. were nine smaller packages 
and boxes, each of which contained a sep- 
arate order. A list of the goods has 
been prepared and is here given: 

Manasseh Levy, Broadway and John Sts., New 
York. Repair slips: 1923, one ladies’ 0-size, fancy 
10-year case, with Tempers movement, $6.25. 1923, 
one ladies’ 0-size, fancy five-year case, with Tem- 
pers movement, $5.75. 

Stern Bros. & Co., 33 Gold St., New York. Four 
gents’ rings, styled signet rings. Package con- 
tained pink memorandum slip and one white in- 
voice; total value about $16. 

Joseph Fahys & Co., New York. Contained 
seven or eight sixteens, 14k. open-face cases, val- 
ued at from $17 to $24. 

Robbins & Appleton, 21 Maiden Lane, New York. 
Repair slip: 19291820, 18-size, 15-jew’eled nickel 
movement; 8811666, Y-size, seven-jeweled nickel 
movement; 9305608, 9306569, 9306520, 9393241; two 
sixties, 0-size, seven-jeweled gilt movement, 9126739, 
9259465. 




CM 


Ceader 

IN 

• ••11 

HIGH-GRADE 

WATCHES 


-IS THE- 



VACHERON & CONSTANTIN, 


GENEVA, SWITZERLAND. 


FIRST in 


Quality, 

Adjustment, 

Durability, 

Style. 




FITS ALL SIZES i r GRADE 

OF AHERICAN i ^ F W/ SIZES 

C/ SES. i 1 N IJ, VV 


GRADES. 


IMPROVEMENTS. 


TRADE-MARK. 

SPECIAL GRADES 
FOR RAILROAD 
HEN. 


I 


EDMOND E. ROBERT, 


3 Maiden Lane, 


SOLE AGENT, 


New York. 


Elgin National Watch Co., 11 John St., New 
York. Repair slips: No. 1923, one No. 2070, 18. 
size, seven-jeweled, nickel movement, 8944391, $4. 
No. 1924, two No. 2060, six-size, seven-jeweled, 
nickel movement, 8390366, 8890923, at $4.M each. 
No. 1925, two 2080, 18-size, seven-jeweled, nickel 
movement, 8635496, 8714428, at $4 each. 

Miss Hammer, Brookline, Mass. One silver 
salad set; value, $20. 

Bates & Bacon, 9 Maiden Lane, New York. 
Two 16 hunting, 20-year filled cases, at $6.50 each. 
On repair slip No. 1922, one fancy case and one 
engine-turned. Nos. 673607, 672891. 

Triumph Watch Co., 37 Maiden Lane, New York. 
Contained 13 16-size “Advance” movements. In 
this package were two repair slips: No. 1921, 12 
“Advance” movements for exchange; No. 1928, one 
“Advance” movement. 

Crescent Watch Case Co., 21 Maiden Lane, New 
York. Contained five 72-size, open-face silver- 
nickel cases, valued at $1.40 each. 

Clever Swindler Works Among the St. 

Louis Trade. 

St. Louis, AIo., Feb. 16. — A diamond sun- 
burst brooch, valued at $800, was obtained 
from the jewelry store of the Merrick, 
Walsh & Phelps Jewelry Co., Thursday af- 
ternoon, and the detectives are looking for 
the thief. 

Thursday afternoon, a young man, fault- 
lessly dressed, walked into the jewelry store 
and, going directly to iMr. Walsh, said he 
wanted to look at some diamonds, and he 
wanted the best in the store. He was not 
long in making a selection, but took the 
diamond sunburst, a very handsome one, 
and asked the price. 

When Mr. Walsh told him, he said: “I 
will take it with me and may send the 
bill to me at the brewery.” “What brew- 
ery?” asked Mr. Walsh. “Why, the Wil- 
liam J. Lemp brewery,” replied the young 


:♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦< 


February 20, 1901. 


THE JEWELERS’ CIRCULAR-WEEKLY. 


27 


man. “I am William J. Lemp, Jr.; you 
surely know me, Mr. Walsh, don’t you?” 
Mr. Walsh thought he did. The young man 
put the jewel into his pocket and walked 
out. 

After he had left the store, Mr. Walsh 
made inquiries. He found he had been 
swindled. The affair was reported to the 
police and detectives put on the case. The 
next day the sunburst, minus one of the 
largest diamonds, was located in the pawn- 
shop of Benjamin Barnett & Co., 607 Pine 
St., where it had been left as security for a 
loan of $175. The police have a description 
of the thief, but he has not been found. 

The day following Mr. Walsh’s experi- 
ence, it developed that the same individual 
had represented himself as Mr. Lemp, Jr., 
at Mermod & Jaccard Jewelry Co.’s store 
and had attempted to obtain possession of 
a diamond crescent there, but his effort was 
foiled by Ernest Jaccard, one of the direc- 
tors of the firm, who insisted on positive 
identification. The stranger appeared indig- 
nant and left the. store. The police think 
the thief is not a local crook. 


Death of Thomas C. Noble. 

Augusta, i\Ie., Feb. 13.— Thomas C. 
Noble, who died in this city last week, 
was known in the jewelry trade. Mr. 
Noble was born in Portsmouth, N. H., 
August 24, 1807, and after leaving school, 
he entered the genera! store of the Co- 
checo Manufacturing Co., where he re- 
mained until attaining his majority. He 
came to Augusta in Oct., 1830, and opened 
a hardware store, subsequently going into 
the grocery business. He gradually 
worked into the clothing and jewelry busi- 
ness, being for years one of our leading 
merchants. He was married in 1835 to 
Adeline Johnson, and three children sur- 
vive him. 


Charles I. Biederman, who has been with 
W. T. Chapman, Pawling, N. Y., for sev- 
eral months past, has returned to his fath- 
er’s jewelry store at Camden, N. Y., and 
taken charge of the watchmaking and opti- 
cal departments. 


NOTICE. J 


0 

❖ 

❖ 

❖ 

❖ 

♦ 

♦ 

♦ 

t 

t 

♦ 

♦ 

♦ 

♦ 

1 

X 

I 

♦ 

: 


February 7th^ fire seriously injured the 
building partly occupied by our factory^ and 
our plant was badly damaged by water* 
In order to expedite the resumption of work 
we have rented a new shop^ larger and better 
than the old one, where we expect to resume 
manufacturing the first week ‘in March* 


/^merieai^ U/atel; ^ase ^o. 

9, II, 13 /Tjaiderj Cape, |^eu; Vbrl(. 


I 





RAILWAY KING. 

18 Size. 

35 Rtiby Jewels. 


COLIMBIS WATCHfS 

...ARE... 

STRICTLY HIGH GRADE. 

...YOU CAN... 

MAKE MORE MONEY handling our 
watches than with any other make. 


The Columbus 
Watch Co., 

COLUMBUS, OHIO. 





OMEGA WATCHES. 

Always good sellers and profitable. Prices not advertised in any journal. 

DO YOU SELL THE OMEGA? 

The Omegas are made in 6 different grades; from 7 to 21 jewels, adjusted; in 
10 and 11 ligne; 0, 12 and 16 sizes; fitting American cases; 
also steel cases and fancy cases for these movements. 


SEND FOR PRICE-LIST. 

EDMOND E. ROBERT, [ selling j CROSS & BEGUELIN, 

3 Maiden Lane. ) 1 „ iflgjjgn |_ 3 „g_ 




28 


THE JEWELERS’ CIRCULAR-WEEKLY. 


February 20, 1901. 


Missouri Jewelers Banquel, 


Enjoyable and Instructive .Affair of the .Missouri 
Retail Jewelers’ .Association. 

St. Locis. Mo.. Feb. 15. — The 11th ar 
nual b.anquet of the Retail Jewelers’ .As- 
sociation of Missouri took place at 
Schrapp's restaurant, 921 Olive St., last 
evening. The table at which the officers 
and invited g^uests were seated was at one 
end of the room and the two other tables 
were placed at right angles to it. They 
were handsomely decorated. 

The second page of the menu card gave 
a list of the toasts and those who were to 
respond to them and these were as follows : 

Herman Mauch. toastmaster. 

"Greater St. Louis. Nothing, Impossible” 
— Hon. Judge Talty. 

"Louisiana Purchase Exposition” — R. H. 
Kern. 

"Mercantile .Association” — Charles Thu- 
ner. 

"Woman. Lovely Woman” — Charles F. 
Krone. 

'Here’s to woman, whose heart and whose soul 

.Are the light and the life of each spell we 
pursue. 

Whether burned at the tropics or chilled at the 
pole. 

If woman be there, there is happiness too.” 

Music by Gaedeck’s orchestra. 

The banquet committee were composed of 
Ihe following members of the Association : 
Herman Mauch, F. W. Bierbaum, F. W. 
Baier, Otto Steiner, W. F. Kemper. 

The following jewelers and their em- 
ployes were present: F. W. Baier, John 


Schmid, \A’. F. Kemper, H. Alauch. F. A\. 
Bierbaum. O. H. Kortkamp, Otto Steiner. 
G. Eckhardt. George Hess, Theodore 
Ebeling, William Brazeale, John Zeitler, 
.Al. Gerne, F. AA'indweh. W. Dueber, R. 
Heitz, H. Kaesser, P. V. Kaesser, John 
Schmid, Jr., A'incent Gorley, J. Ryser, F. 
Besse, George Stumpf, W. Wolfsberger, 

AI. Hocker, George Konert, J. C. .Adams 
and Charles Pfeiffer. The Eisenstadt Alfg. 
Co. were represented by .Albert Freeh, H. 
C. Hain. Louis Gutfreund, W. Barker, G. 
Gambrill, .A. Eisenbeiss and E. B. Hull ; 
Bauman-AIassa Jewelry Co. were rep- 
resented by Ed. Massa, Jul. Wendell apd 

T. Felshncr ; the St. Louis Clock and -Si' 
ver Ware Co. were represented by Dick 
Pfeffer, F. L. Steiner and .A. J. Alarks: 
the Weiss Jewelry Manufacturing Co. were 
represented by M. L. Weiss and J. Auer; 
William Weidlich & Bro. w’ere represented 
by William and E. C. Weidlich; the Merry 
Pelton Silver Co. by O. J. Wilmarth; the 
Waterbury Clock Co. by Charles C. .Ay- 
bell and William Pettee ; the L. Bauman 
Jew'clry Co. by J. B. Hartmann and J. A. 
Delmar; H. Froehlich & Co.. New' York, by 
S. H. Veit; R. Lowenstein by S. Loebner ; 
the Bauman & Frey Alfg. Co. by J. Frey, 
and J. W. Cary & Co. by Ed. Lang and 
Jul. Steidemann; C. N. Van Buren ; W. C. 
Howland, correspondent of The Jewelers’ 
Circul.xr-Weekly. 

Judge Talty, who responded to the toast, 
“Greater St. Louis, Nothing Impossible,” 
made a fine address aiid spoke of St. Louis 
as a manufacturing center, its resources 
and its various big enterprises and predict- 
ed a bright future for the city, compli- 


menting highly the jew'elry industry. He 
also spoke of the benefits that the World's 
Fair would be to it and took a look into 
the future and pictured w'hat the city would 
be after the World's Fair. 

Air. Kern, responding to the toast, 
“Louisiana Purchase Exposition,” made 
many brilliant and forceful remarks in the 
course of his toast. He laughingly began ” 
by saying that Judge Talty had taken pai‘t 
of his subject from him, but that he would 
forgive him for it, as all were so interested 
in having the World’s Fair that it was im- 
possible to speak without saying some- 
thing about it. He said that the jewelers’ 
industry' contributeil as much as any other 
industry to the success of this country. 

He also spoke of the many obstacles the 
World’s Fair promoters had to overcome 
and said the jcw'elers had done their share 
in every way, both financially and in giv- 
ing assistance in trying to secure it. He 
also pictured what the World’s Fair w'ould 
do for the city, and what a number of 
strangers it would bring to the city as well 
as the great number of new ideas. He 
predicted that the population of St. Louis 
would number a million of people as a re- 
sult of the great enterprise and that it 
rested with the people of St. Louis to se- 
cure this big increase by making the 
strangers who came to visit it desire to 
stay'. He said that the jewelers’ interests 
and hard work banded with the other in- 
dustries would bring about this result. 

It meant much and he asked that the jew- 
elers continue to give all the help they pos- 
sibly could. 

Air. Thuner, responding to the toast, 
“Alercantile .Associations,” spoke at 
length and with great earnestness of the 
value of mercantile associations and of the 
many benefits that would come to the 
business interests of the city, and to the 
laboring man as well, by helping each 
other and fighting for things that could be 
secured only by working together. 

Air. Krone made the witty' speech of the 
evening when he spoke on women. His 
remarks were frequently interrupted by 
laughter and applause. 

.After the regular toasts had been made 
the toastmaster called on several others, 
and a number of bright remarks were 
made by the members of the .Association 
and their guests. 

W’hile the banquet was m progress, a 
girl, dressed in the uniform of a district 
messenger boy, distributed valentines to 
each one at the tables. Some were dainty 
and some were comic. Great fun was 
caused while the guests received them. It 
is said that Sam and Alorris Eisenstadt 
were the senders, as they were not in at- 
tendance, owing to the death of their uncle. 
Air. Jacobs. Their presence was missed 
greatly, as they are popular and have never 
missed a previous banquet. 

Two or three vaudeville acts were intro- 
duced in the course of the evening, en- 
livening the proceedings. 

It was conceded by' those present that it 
was one of the best banquets ever given 
by the .-Association. 

THE .ANNUAL MEETING. 

The 11th annual meeting of the Re- ' 
tail Jewelers’ .Association of Alissouri I 
was held at 3 o’clock, Feb. 13, at 507 


A Point to Remember 



DUEBER-HAMPDEN WATCHES 


AND 


DUEBER-HAMPDEN WATCHES 


No Goods 
Sold at Retail. 


MEAN 


Maiden Lane, New York. 

LARGEST DISTRIBUTORS IN AMERICA. 

Get Into Correspondence With Us. 




I 


I 


\ 

'I 


a 


4 

N 

« 


I 

I 


February 20, 1901. 


THE JEWELERS’ CIRCULAR-WEEKLY. 


2Sa 



APPROVED ! 

W HEN we decided upon the New Departure in 
the manufacture of CRESCENT WATCH 
CASES, we firmly believed that there was a demand for a better gold-filled 
case than had ever been made and that the jewelry trade were willing to 
pay a higher price for such a case. The many orders and numerous con- 
gratulatory letters received daily show that our belief was well founded. 

No case ever before placed upon the market has received such hearty 
and immediate approval. 

EXTRACTS FROM A FEW OF MANY LETTERS RECEIVED. 


I wint to say that I think you make the best filled 
case in the market, and I believe there will be a demand 
for your "Extra'' Fine Filled Watch Case ; I am sure I 
will buy some the first opportunity I have. 

We note with pleasure your intention to make a better 
case. It is certainly refreshing to find a manufacturer now- 
adays who is improving the quality of goods, for it seems 
as if every one is aiming to produce as cheap a quality as he 
can. We think the public is willing to pay for a better article. 
Your cases have always given satisfaction to our trade. 

We wish to compliment you on the fact that you are 
going to make a filled case with gold enough in it so that 
where a jeweler wishes to sell an article that will wear 
equal to a gold case, there will be one in the market which 
he can get. We think you are heading in the right direction 
and wish you success in your enterprise. 

You cannot make filled cases too good for os. When 
the’ line is on the market, we will use them. We are 
glad to see the advancement to better made cases. 

I think you have struck the right track. More gold, 
better finish, more money, more satisfaction, more watch 
sales for the dealer who cares for his reputation. I shall 
do what I can to sell the new case and believe 1 can do it. 

There will be a place in our stock for your "Extra" 
cases ; we are glad to know that such a line is avail- 
able. We will use them when they are ready for the market. 






r'i? 

TRADE p CWCCO. 

EXTRA 


This new case, which is an 

EDITION DE LUXE 


CRESCLNT 

EXTRA 


is Mode of TWO HEAVY plates of 

FOURTEEN KARAT GOLD 

With piafe of Composition bptwaen. 
SHOULD THE GOU) PLATES WFAR 
VTHROCOU anew CASHWID.BECrVKN 
LN EXCKANOf-ATANY TIMK. 

v5ltpi£r«rmi iOatrh iCnsflEfly 


of our regular work, contains about twice as 
much gold as any filled case on the market. Ex- 
tra care has been taken in the finish and every 
detail has had the most minute attention. They contain 
more gold and will wear longer and looK better than many solid gold cases. 
SAMPLES AND PRICE=LISTS FROM THE JOBBING TRADE. 




The crescent WATCH CASE CO 

NEW YORK. CHICAGO. BOSTON. SAN FRANCISCO. 


THE JEWELERS’ CIRCULAR-WEEKLY. 


February 20, 1901. 









HEINTZ BROS., 


Ring: 

Makers, 

BUFFALO. 
N. Y. 


Ring 

Makers, 

BUFFALO, 
N. Y. 


t We make the largest line of Solid Gold Set Rings in America for the Retail Trade. | 




No. 218. No. 327. No. 239. No. 306. 

PITZELE «t BASCHKOPF, 

^I^E DI4«0^D MOlINTINOS, 

12 Itlaiden Lane, .... New York. 

Our styles and prices can’t be beat. Call and be convinced. 



No. 34 9. 



F.NADELIVIAN&CO. 

Manufacturers of 

FINE CASES 

For Jewelry and Silverware. 

■* -31 41 

TRAYS FOR TRAVELERS. 
FINE VELVET AND 
LEATHER NOVELTIES. 

-31 - 3 » -31 

51-53 W. 13th STREET, 


The above illustrates one of a large variety of stvles in 
ournew 'ilv«>r«areand I oilet Cases, l^atent applied for. 


NRW YORK. 


Franklin Ave. The old officers were unani- 
mously re-elected as follows; F. \V. 
Baler, president; John Schmid, vice-presi- 
dent; William F. Kemper, secretary; 
Herman Mauch, financial secretary: F. W. 
Rierbaum, treasurer ; directors, O. H. Kort- 
kamp, Otto Steiner, William Henkler, 
Charles Derleth. Gerhard Eckhardt. 
George Hess, F. W. Drosten and Frank 
Niehaus. 

The annual reports of the standing com- 
mittees were read and adopted, and the 
secretary was instructed to have printed 
copies sent to all members. 

The grievance committee reported a 
grievance against “fake auctions,” and the 
matter was fully considered. 

The Association resolved to take an 
active part in the Louisiana Purchase 
Centennial and to appoint committees 
at the proper time to look after the jew- 
elry trade interests, and to establish head- 
quarters for visiting jewelers. 


Tariff Decisions & Regulations. 

.Among the decisions handed down the 
past week by the Board of Classification of 
the United States General Appraisers were; 

Charles Mayer & Co., Indianapolis, imported 
decorated china, which was assessed at 60 per 
cent., under paragraph 95, of act of 1897. The im- 
porters claimed it to be dutiable at 35 per cent., 
under paragraph 418, of the act of 1897. The goods 
were found to be bisque figures of babies, to be 
used as ornaments. The protest was overruled. 

Heroy & Marrenner, New York, imported con- 
cavo-convex glass disks, which were assessed at 
45 per cent., under paragraph 109. act of 1897. The 
importers claimed the merchandise to be entitled 
to free entry, under paragraph 565. When the 
case was called, the importers failed to appear or 
offer evidence. The protest was therefore overruled. 

REAPPR.VISEMENTS. 

Among the recent reappraisements of 
merchandise by the Board of United States 
General Appraisers were the following; 

Precious stones, from W. Goldwasser, Antwerp, 
Dec. 29, 1900. — Cut diamonds, 42 stones, 42 3/16 
karats, entered at 242. advanced to 275 francs per 
karat; 28 stones, 8 13/16 karats, entered at 220, ad- 
vanced to 240 francs per karat; 53 stones, 25 15/16 
karats, entered at 248, advanced to 275 francs per 
karat. 

Jewelry, from Elias Monakad, Paris, Dec. 21, 
1900. — Brochen email, entered at 16 ^francs per 
gross; Brochen turquoise, entered at 17 francs per 
gross; discount 25 per cent., advanced to discount 
20 per cent.; Juvenia (echant.), entered at 40 
francs per dozen; discount 50 per cent., advanced 
to discount 25 per cent. Cases and packages in- 
cluded. 


FOR THE, NEW YEAR ! 


TO THE RETAIL JEWELRY TRADE; 


We offer the result of more than Fifty Years of 
Ring Making, confident that the methods we now employ enable us to furnish you the most 
desirable goods for QUALITY, STYLE and PRICE obtainable. 



are most worthy of your attention. Do not 
neglect their purchase. Goods sent on 
approval to responsible parties. 


M. B. BRYANT 6 CO.. 7 MAIDEN LANE, NEW YORK. 



February 20, 1901. 


THE JEWELERS’ CIRCULAR-WEEKLY. 


28c 


Solid Gold Pendant and Bow. 

/ 


This is the new feature which will appeal to every practical watchmaker 
as being absolutely essential in a permanently guaranteed gold-filled case* 
The pendant is the handle of the case and has more wear and friction 
than any other part of case* 

The gold stock on both outside and inside of the backs of 

Fahys Permanently Guaranteed 
14k. Filled Gases 

is about double the thickness of that used in the best 25-year guaranteed cases* 
Below is copy of certificate which accompanies each case* 

TO WEAR 

This case, 

No ^ , 

is made of two extra heavy sheets of 
I4k. gold, stiffened by a sheet of hard metal between. 

WE GUARANTEE 

that, should the gold sheets wear through, 
a new case will be given in exchange at any time. 

It has a solid gold pendant. 

It has a solid gold bow. 

It has solid 


gold joints. 




ASK YOUR JOBBER FOR PRICES. 


February 20, 1901. 


THE JEWELERS’ CIRCULAR-WEEKLY. 


The Second Annual Beefsteak Dinner 
of the i8-Karat Club. 

Beefsteak, good spirits and a jolly 
crowd combined to make an enjoyable 
time for 04 the employes of Tiffany & 
C ' , New York. Saturday night. The 
beefsteak came in luscious, juicy chunks: 
the good spirits were drawn fresh from 
the wood, and the jolly crowd was com- 
posed of the members of the 18-Karat 
Club, assembled to partake of their 
second annual beefsteak dinner. 

The feed was held in Healey’s Dun- 
geon, a subterranean grotto at Columbus 


ing conspicuously absent. 

The menu, or programme, or score- 
card — call it what you will — which was 
unicjuely printed on the coarsest of brown 
paper, gave notice of a bout of 25 rounds 
at catchweights. The start was at 7 p.m., 
the finish, no one knows just when, as 
every watch in the crowd had run down. 

The officials of the bout were: Referee, 

H. H. Treadwell; timer and interrupter, 
E. D. Bird: steakholder, W. H. Joslyn; 
chop-per, A. Turgeon; beer-ale expert, 
John C. Hall. 

Among other numbers on the bill were 
songs by the Tiffany Diamond Quartette, 


the speaking and singing became general, 
and when the crowd broke up everyone 
was grateful to the committee for a most 
enjoyable evening. 

A list of those who participated included: Wil- 
liam J. Armstrong, C. Asten, E. L. Barnard, A. 
J. Barrett, Claude Berard, E. D. Bird, Harry 
Bogert, Emerson Bostwick, George Bremser, J. B. 
Brosseau, Jr., William H. Brown, E. A. Brush, 
J. J. Burns, James H. Carll, Charles S. Chase, 
Samuel W. Christie, H. C. Connell, Walter L. 
Cook, John T. Curren, Hugh Dalzell, John D. 
Dalzell, M. M. Dodd, Frank Doman, William S. 
Eaton, E. W. Gavey, John C. Hall, George F. 
Heydt, H. W. Hiller, J. Hovenden, Oscar Jaeckel, 
Harry Johnson, Walter H. Joslyn, Thomas C. 
King, F. J. Knight, J. Egbert Lent, J. T. Lough- 



SO.ME SCENES AT THE SECOND ANNUAL BEEFSTEAK DINNER OF THE 18-KARAT CLUB. 


V r-‘id Ofith St., into which the 18- 
Karat tr< )p. d, and having divested them- 
Iv J coats and waistcoats, donned 
"s ' 'i' ' garments. They then sat 
a. .-•lit tiie in.-iting board, which was com- 
P'. ed s' champagne cases piled three 
high a A gr*iuped on three sides of a long 
'adrangl :, 

Immediai ;ly thereafter the creatures of 
the good geniu.^ of the dungeon passed 
down -he line, dispensing dainty morsels 
of beef, erved on gravy soaked bread, 
also beverages of varying hues of yellow 
and amber, followed by other viands, all 
of which were disposed of with nature’s 
own utensils, knives, forks and plates be- 


composed of T. C. King, William Moore, 
H. Johnson and E. H. Thayer, while Wil- 
liam O’Shear did sundry tricks with cards 
and played a cornet. B. Russell Throck- 
morton recited “The Jolly Pedagogue” 
and other pieces, while Selters Waters, a 
real funny man, convulsed the members. 

A coronation also had a part in the 
proceedings. Frank Doman, as the origi- 
nator of the beefsteak dinner idea, was 
dubbed by the “Referee” King Francis I., 
and invested with a crown of massive 
gold (paper). 

At the completion of the programme, 
Gol. Treadwell called upon several of the 
prominent members to speak, after which 


rey, M. F. Magee, A. W. Mather, J. Charles Met- 
tam, Edward Miller, William Moore, Ten Broeck 

B. Mor.se, T. F. Morton, C. Myers, T. M. Nelson, 
J. D. Nunan, H. W. S. Pell, F. W. Pleister, 

C. E. Rogers, A. S. Rose, P. Ross, T. Ryan, A. 
W. Schumacher, Charles G. Shelton, William Snif- 
fen, E. H. Thayer, B. Russell Throckmorton, E. 
V. Titus, Adolph Trost, Arthur Turgeon, Harry 
J. White, Fred. W. Whitehouse, John Williams. 


H. L. Benedict, Syracuse, N. Y., junior 
member of the East Syracuse firm of M. S. 
Benedict Mfg. Co., has bought of “Bert” 
Whitley, of Muncie, Ind., “Jim Ross” for 
$750. The horse can make 2.15, though 
he has no mark. Mr. and Mrs. Benedict 
have been visiting in Muncie. 


February 20, 1901. 


THE JEWELERS’ CIRCULAR-WEEKLY. 


29 


Connecticut. 

L. F. Ising, Danbur}', has been holding 
an auction sale. 

E. F. Bennett, who was formerly in the 
jewelry business in New Britain, is now en- 
gaged in mining at Pike’s Peak, Col. 

The watch factory in Cheshire was closed 
completely, Feb. 11, when the machinery 
was shipped to the purchasers in Ohio. 
The property belonged to Seth E. Thomas, 
of Thomaston. 

Jeweler William Gorfinkel, Hartford, 
who had been in the county jail awaiting 
trial in the Superior Court on a charge of 
stealing a diamond ring, was, Feb. 8, re- 
leased on bail of $1,000. 

S. A. Jones, president of the defunct 
Meriden Bronze Co., Thomas Levens and 
Weesterbarth Bros, have formed a com- 
pany to make brass goods in the latter’s 
shop on ^Miller St., INIeriden. They will 
employ about 25 hands. 

Sea\w L. Burgess, for the past nine years 
a traveling salesman for the C. F. ilonroe 
Co., ^Meriden, is no longer connected with 
that company, and has taken a position as 
head salesman for one of the largest china 
companies in the country'. 

Commissioner Benjamin F. Lee has re- 
ceived applications for space in the Buffalo 
E.xposition from these Connecticut manu- 
facturers among others : George W. Parker, 
Danburj', art potteiy^; Landers, Frary & 
Clark, New Britain, cutlerj'. 

An order was granted in the Superior 
Court, New Haven, by Judge Roraback, a 
few days ago, extending the time for the 
presentation of claims against the Barker 
Silver Co. This is a Milford concern now 
in the hands of a receiver and the claims 
are not all in. 

At the annual meeting of the Biggins- 
Rodgers Co., Wallingford, the following 
board of directors were elected : E. T. Car- 
ter, Meriden ; F. W. Miner, New Haven ; 
Henry E. Biggins, Dr. O. E. Powers and 
Henry B. Hall. The directors elected these 
officers : President, Henry E. Biggins ; sec- 
retary, Henry B. Hall ; treasurer, F. W. 
Miner. 

The Scovill iMfg. Co., of Water- 
buiy, held their annual meeting in the 
company offices, last Tuesday, and re- 
elected the following officers ; Presi- 
dent, treasurer and general manager, C. 
P. Goss, Sr.; vice-president, F. J. Kings- 
burj'; assistant treasurer, Edward O. Goss; 
secretary, M. L. Sperrj^ ; assistant secretary, 
T. R. Hyde. Jr. 

At the annual meeting of the Edward 
Miller Co., ^leriden, Tuesday fast, new di- 
rectors were elected to fill the vacancies 
caused by the death of the late O. B. 
Arnold and Lewis Hall. The following di- 
rectors were chosen : Edw'ard Miller and 
Edward Miller, Jr., Arthur E. Miller, John 
L. Billard, A. Chamberlain, Henry J. Lewis 
and B. C. Kennard. Messrs. Chamberlain, 
Lewis and Kennard are new directors, tak- 
ing the places of Messrs. Arnold and Hall, 
deceased, and Fred Ives, who retires. The 
directors met and re-elected the old officers, 
as follows : President, Edward Miller ; sec- 
retary and treasurer, Edward Miller, Jr.; 
assistant treasurer, B. C. Kennard. 

The receiver of the Barker Silver Co., 
Milford, has reported that the business of 
silver plating is now in condition to go on 


xh 

* 

-> 

♦ 

* 

♦ 

♦ 

* 

t 

♦ 

♦ 

♦ 

♦ 

* 

: '► 

' 

! I 
; ♦ 
♦ 

I t 
I t 

it 

^ I 

I 

I 

■t 

I 

♦ 

I 

-h 

I 

I 

I 


The Giant of 
Collar Buttons 


IN QIALITY, 
IN SALES. 



WHY? 


One Million Five Hundred 
Thousand Krementz 
One-Piece Collar Buttons 
made and sold within 
the last year 


Because of their highest quality, best 

CONSTRUCTION, GIVING THE MOST 
WEAR, AND GREATEST COMFORT 
and their IRON-CLAD GUARANTEE. 


To verify this we invite the trade to read “The 5tory of a 
Collar Button, with Illustrations,” which may be had FREE for 
the asking-, and to try the experiment suggested on page 5 of 
that booklet. 


Extract from “ Printers’ Ink,” 
Nov. 23. 1898. 

The Little Schoolmaster now sufr- 
ffests, to every pupil in his class, to 
send a two-cent stamp to Krementz 
& Co., 49 Chestnut Street, Newark, 
N. J., and ask to be favored with a 
copy of their leaflet, "The Story of 
a Collar Button.’’ Afterward, if 
any pupil will send to Printers' Ink 
another leaflet, new or old, that is 
half as good as this one, or that ap- 
proaches it in excellence, the de- 
serving student will be rewarded 
with one of Printers' 7n.4’r souvenir 
spoons as an acknowledgment of 
his discovery and contribution. 
"The Story of a Collar Button ’" is 
the best piece of advertisement 
construction that has come to 
Printers' attention in the year 
of our Lord 1898. 


Should y~on wish to utilize 
this booklet to increase your 
collar button business, we 
will, on receipt of your order, 
print your card upon and 
send you a quantity of them. 


Krementz One-Piece Collar Buttons are stamped as 
follows. ON BACKS; 



Patent sustained by United States Supreme Court. 

Quality and Construction have made our 

reputation. 

All Krementz Collar Buttons are Manufactured by 

KREMENTZ & CO., 

in their Factory, 

49 Chestnut Street, 

PARKS BROS. & ROGERS, 

20 Maiden Lane, New York. NEWARK, N. J 

Selling Agents to Jobbing Trade. 


t 

t 

t. 

I 

I 

I 

I 

t 

«> 

t 

•*' 

C' 

*: 

Ar 

A' 

♦- 

<' 

A' 

A- 

A? 

A' 

A:- 

<' 

A- 

*■- 

Ap 

A' 

Ar 

Ar 

A^ 

Ar 

A- 

Ar 

A^ 

A- 

A- 

Ar 

Ar 

A' 

A- 

A- 

Ar 

A' 

A~ 

A' 

<' 

A' 

Ar 

A- 

A- 

Ar 

A' 

A- 

Ar 

Ar 

A- 

Ar 

A' 

Ar 

A~ 

Ar 

Ar 

Ar 

A' 

Ar 

A' 

A' 

Ar 

Ar 

Ar 

A- 

Ar 

A'. 

A- 

A~ 

Ar 

Ar 

Ar 

A' 

A: 

Ar 

A- 

Ar 

Ar 

«■ 



30 


THE JEWELERS’ CIRCULAR-WEEKLY. 


February 20, 1901, 


A.&B. 

HEADQUARTERS 

FOR 

Waltham Watches 

EVERY GRADE. 

One of our 

SPECIALTIES 

is a 

Waltham 0 size move= 
merit, nickel, 1 1 jewels 
in settings, Breguet 
hairspring; Htg., O. F. 
and Skylight. 

Sample sent for inspection if desired. 

Avery & Brown, 

68]Nassau St., New York. 


and he has been authorized to continue it. 
He said that tliey were busy now and able 
to employ 31 hands. 

C. E. Polsey, secretary and treasurer of 
the E. Bliss Co., iUeriden, has gone to 
the Bcrnnulas for a short trip. 

A. \\’. Austin, South Norwalk, is to va- 
cate his present store April 1. Mr. Austin 
will locate in some other store. 

A notice has been posted in the works 
of the Shelton factory of the International 
Silver Co., stating that the factory will run 
10 hours per day. 

Joseph Pinsker, watchmaker and jeweler, 
who has closed out his business in Port- 
land, is looking about for another location 
to establish himself in business. 

John Spencer, of J. Spencer & Co., 
South Norwalk, has disposed of his interest 
in the business to his partner, Henry F. Col- 
burn. In the future the firm will be known 
under the title of Colburn & Lauder. 

Gen. George H. Ford, New Haven, 
president of the David Humphrey’s 
Branch of the Connecticut Society Sons 
of the American Revolution^, was the 
guest, Friday evening, Feb. 15, in New 
York city, of the Empire State Society, 
S. A. R., at the latter society’s banquet. 

The annual statement of the New Eng- 
land Watch Co. is: Capital stock, .$588,750. 
Directors, E. L. Frisbie, Jr., A. O. Jen- 
nings, H. S. Chase, J. S. Elton, E. C 
Lewis, H. W. Scovill, J. H. Bronson, C. 
N. Wayland, D. L. Dresser and G. W. 
Burnham; president, E. L. Frisbie, Jr.; 
treasurer, E. L. Frisbie, Jr., and secretary, 
A. O. Jennings. 

The annual statement of the Benedict & 
Burnham Mfg. Co. is: Capital stock, $400,- 
000. Directors, E. C. Lewis, E. L. Fris- 
bie, Jr., G. W. Burnham, A. \V. Dickinson, 
J. Hobart Bronson, J. S. Elton, C. "N. 
Wayland, H. L. Wade and D. L. Dresser; 
president and treasurer, E. L. Frisbie, Jr.; 
assistant treasurer, G. W. Burnham; secre- 
tary, A. M. Dickinson. 


Boston. 

Royal E. Robbins, of Robbins, Appleton 
& Co., has been drawn for jury duty. 

D. C. Percival has been elected to mem- 
bership in the New York Yacht Club. 

Charles E. Durgin, city salesman for the 
Thomas Long Co., has been recently elect- 
ed Worthy Patron, Mystic Chapter, No. 
34, O. E. S., of East Boston. 

Boston members of the trade received 
announcements last week that the jewelry 
firm of C. B. Duckworth, Pawtucket, R. 
L, had been succeeded by the new firm of 
Edward Goffe & Son. 

Before Judge Sheldon, in the Superior 
Court, Friday, the bail of David Wer- 
blinsky, David Turner and Simon Gold- 
stein, charged with stealing a safe from 
the store of Morse Bros., jewelers, 85 
Lowell St., was raised from .$1,200 to $3,000 
each. They will not be tried until March, 
and the Government wished to make sure 
of their presence then. 

Among the buyers in town last week 
were seen: Mr. Gillespie, of Richardson 
& Gillespie, Leominster, Mass.; S. W. 
Baker, Rockland, Mass.; A. C. Tucker, 
Whitman, Mass.; C. W. Wilcox, Milford, 
Mass.; H. P. N. Dahl, Maynard, Mass.; H. 
S. Hewitt, Brockton, Mass.; John Cham- 
berlain, of B. M. Chamberlain & Son, Sa- 
lem, Mass.; L. R. Hapgood, Dover, N. 
H.; H. R. Miller, South Framingham, 
IVIass. ; Nelson H. Davis, Worcester, 
Mass.; F. F, Shaw, Manchester, N. H. 


W. G. Austin, Martinsburg, Va., has 
rented a new store on W. King St., that 
city, into which he will remove his jev,-- 
elry business about April 1. 

U. G. Miller has moved from Columbus 
Junction, la., to Muscatine, la., where he 
will open a jewelry store. 





DESPITE ALL COMBINATIONS AND 
OBSTACLES CONNECTED WITH OBTAINING 
ROUGH SUITABLE FOR THIS MARKET. WE WILL 
RECEIVE BY THIS WEEK'S STEAMER THE FIRST PART 
OF A LARGE. PURCHASE, OF 

ROUGH 

WHICH, after being cut and POLISHED BY US IN THE MOST SCIENTIFIC MANNER, will be offered to the wholesale trade in 
original lots IN ABOUT FOUR "WEEKS. WE ALSO RECEIVE WEEKLY SHIPMENTS OF 

MELEES AND ROSE DIAMONDS, 

AS WELL AS THE CHEAPER CLASS OF LARGE GOODS, WHICH WE MANUFACTURE OURSELVES IN ANTWERP, BEING 
ABLE TO PRODUCE THIS CLASS OF GOODS TO BETTER ADVANTAGE THERE. 

CUTTING WORKS: 


Cor. Dutch and John Sts., NEW YORK. 
299 Longua Rue D’Argile, ANTWERP. 


— 26 John Street. NEW YORK. 

OFFICES: Rue le Peletler, PARIS. 

2 Tulp Straat, AMSTERDAM 


February 20, 1901. 


31 


THE JEWELERS’ CIRCULAR-WEEKLY. 


Canada Notes. 

TRADE CONDITIONS. 

There are few special features in connection 
with the preparations for the Spring trade. The 
demand for heart-shaped goods of all kinds 
and colors which has for some time prevailed 
in the United States is now at its height here 
and likely to continue for some time. Brace- 
lets remain much in vogue. In long chains the 
tendency is towards a heavier line of goods. The 
general demand is for good articles, the people 
having become dissatisfied with the cheaper lines 
and inclined to look with suspicion upon guaran- 
tees if prices appear too low in accordance with 
the quality. This tendency manifests itself 
strongly in connection with the watch trade, the 
reduction in the price of filled gold cases having 
made buyers doubtful as to the quality. The 
“scheme jewelry’’ business appears to have spent 
its force, but sales were very large during its 
continuance. Encouraged by the activity of the 
souvenir trade last year, manufacturers are placing 
on the market a more extensive line than has 
hitherto been produced. It is anticipated that the 
bolding of the Buffalo Pan-American Exposition 
will cause a great demand for souvenirs in the 
neighboring Canadian towns and cities, but no 
special designs are being made on this side of 
the line. The clock trade is better than last year, 
but the cheaper grades are selling best. The 
watch movement business is extremely good, al- 
though stocks are short, but the situation is im- 
proving in this respect and it is probable that the 
market will soon be adequately supplied. In ster- 
ling silver the local manufacturers are making 
great efforts to increase production so as to meet 
the competition of an American company who will 
start a factory in Canada. 


J. R. Munshaw, Wingham, Ont., has sold 
out to H. Chisholm. 

E. L. McDonald & Co., of Wawanesa, 
Man., were recently burned out. 

J. F. Van Dusen has removed from 
Flesherton, Ont., to Dundalk, Ont. 

W. H. Wallace, Dauphin, Man., has 
closed his branch store at Gilbert Plains, 
Man. 

The stock of F. C. Dunne & Co., Chat- 
ham, Ont., has been sold to Von Gunton 
Bros. 

J. & A. Yake, formerly of College St., To- 
ronto, have opened a jewelry store at 361 
Yonge St. 

J. C. Swallow. Midland, Ont., has been 
seriously ill with typhoid fever for about 
two months. 

A-Ibert T. Shad, jeweler, St. Catharines, 
Ont., has given a chattel mortgage for $100 
to Martha Aikins. 

The store of Osborne Strathearn, Kaslo, 
B. C., has been partially destroyed by fire. 
Estimated loss, $1,400. 

The stock, etc., of A. W. Bice, Ailsa 
Craig, Ont., is advertised for sale by ten- 
der and the business is to be closed out. 

Out-of-town buyers visiting Toronto, last 
week, included E. Smith, Oakville ; Robert 
Frost, Orillia; George Momas, Bracebridge, 
and W. H. Burke, Bruce Mines. 


A. R. Ffarmon, representing Robbins, 
Appleton & Co., and J. Wilmarth, represent- 
ing W. H. Wilmarth & Co., Attleboro, were 
in Toronto, last week. 

Joseph Thibault, who was arrested about a 
month ago for stealing valuable stones from 
the jewelry store of Mr. Thibadeau, Mon- 
treal, had his trial before Judge Desnoyers, 
last Friday afternoon. The Court decided 
that the evidence brought up oy the detec- 
tive was sufficient to convict the prisoner, 
who w'as adjudged guilty. 

On the evening of the 14th inst., the male 
employes of Ambrose Kent & Sons, Toronto, 
to the number of 44, enjoyed a sleigh ride to 
Borrell’s hotel, York Mills, where supper was 
taken and a very pleasant evening passed. 
They presented W. L. Wilkinson with a sil- 
ver-mounted pipe and a pouch of tobacco, 
and their host, Mr. Borrell, wdth a Masonic 
signet' ring. 


Philadelphia. 

Louis Beconne has resigned his position 
with Kingsbacher Bros., 516 Wood St., 
Pittsburgh, and is back in this city. 

Al. Brown has been promoted foreman 
of Wanamaker’s jewelry repair factory, 
to succeed George Kearsch, resigned. 

P. F. Schilliol, with Smith & Dreer, 
jewelers, 10th and Arch Sts., has returned 
from a three months’ pleasure trip through 
Europe. 

James Bathgate, the genial manager of 
Gimbel’s watch department, has been 
elected a member of the Philadelphia 
Jewelers’ Club. 

William Blair, of Blair & Crawford, re- 
tail jewelers, 806 Chestnut St., is the reg- 
ular Republican candidate for school di- 
rector in the 15th Ward. 

The members of the Philadelphia Jew- 
elers’ Club are preparing to hold a pool 
tournament as soon as the shuffleboard 
tournament, now in progress, is ended. 

George White, who carries jewelry from 
the material supply houses in this city to 
Norristown retailers, and who has been 
sick for a month, has recovered and is 
again at work. 

William B. Crawford and Joseph Wright 
have been arrested and committed for 
trial charged with robbing Thomas Car- 
son, an initerant diamond dealer, of $500 
worth of gems. 

Richard Weyl, agent for the Meriden 
Cutlery Co., and S. R. Kamp, of L. P. 
White, are away on trips through western 
Pennsylvania and Ohio, and will not be 
back until April. 

Jack Pettingell, who covers the Phila- 


delphia market in the interests of the In- 
ternational Silver Co., received the felici* 
tations of the local trade while here last 
week, on his recent marriage. 

Joseph Bittner, the well-to-do jewelry 
engraver, who mysteriously disappeared 
two weeks ago from the home of his 
daughter, 2130 Park Ave., has been found. 
He is detained in Milwaukee by the police 
of that city pending an investigation as to 
his sanity. 

William G. Atherholt, who has been 
covering contiguous territory for L. C. 
Reisner & Co.’s branch establishment in 
this city, has been promoted to western 
and southern salesman for the Lancaster 
house. He will make trips of from eight 
to 14 weeks. His successor at the Phila- 
delphia establishment has not yet been 
chosen. 

A bill recently introduced into the Leg- 
islature imposing a mercantile license tax 
on all vendors of or dealers in goods, 
wares, merchandise, and providing for the 
collection of this tax by one collector for 
each county, meets with strong objections 
from r-etail jewelers throughout the State, 
and a movement is on foot to petition 
against the passage of the bill. 

In order to meet the requirements of 
a trade constantly increasing in volume, 
C. F. Rumpp & Sons, manufacturers of 
fine leather goods and novelties for the 
jewelry trade, in plain and sterling 
mounted, have decided to build an addi- 
tion to their factory at the southwest 
corner of 5th and Cherry Sts. It will be 
52x110 feet, of mill construction. 

C. A. Carmany, retail jeweler, Coates- 
ville. Pa., was in this city last week to 
replenish a stock depleted by thieves last 
Monday. Mr. Carmany stated that a 
stranger entered his store and asked to 
see some rings.. He laid out several for 
his inspection and turned to get some 
more when the stranger grabbed five rings 
and dashed out of the door. He was 
pursued, but effected his escape. 

The receivers of James D. Hughes, vol- 
untary bankrupt, who recently traded as 
Hughes, McGlensey & Co., jobbers. 111 
8th St., have declared a dividend of 20 per 
cent., to be followed in a few weeks by 
another dividend of 15 per cent., making 
the total dividend 35 per cent. Mr. 
Hughej is still ill at his father’s house in 
Phoenixville, with Bright’s disease. His 
physicians have declared his ailment in- 
curable. 

John B. Martin, one of the most widely 
known and popular jewelry salesmen in 
Philadelphia, and who for some years past 



DEITSCH BROS., 

MAKERS OF FINE LEATHER GOODS, 


ALSO 


IVORY, EBONY AND SHELL, 


14 East 17th Street, 


NEW YORK. 


31’ 


THE JEWELERS’ CIRCULAR-WEEKLY. 


February 20, 1901. 




;:.i5 iir’d a p isilioii of trust with Simons. 
P.; . . 1 , was one of the passengers 

n the riyde Line steamer Comanche. 
w^’’ch was nearly consumed by flames at 
st.i, \\\ d.;-iv.s.d::y morning last, and consid- 
erable ri’.ief is f. It by his associates that 
■sea ed death. Mr. Martin had em- 
larked .at Xew York city southbound to 
Jr .'ksonville. his purpose being to accept 
■■ ■.'iiion with Greenleaf & Crosby Co.. 
ieweC-rs. that city. Mr. Martin intends 
r remain with Greenleaf & Crosby Co. 
two months, when he will return to Phila- 
■"’phia and re.-ume his duties at Simons, 
Fro. & Co. The trip is taken to restore 
?>Ir. Martin's health, which has been 
somewhat impaired of late. 

J, L. Jofti, retail jeweler. 3d St. below 
Ciirard Ave.. was arrested Feb. 15. charged 
with receiving stolen goods consisting of 
i.rtelry valued at ^75. representing the 
proceeds of various boarding-house rob- 
beries by Harry Gilmore, alias James Car- 
penter. alias James Melville, who has al- 
ready pleaded guilty. The detectives re- 


covered a gold bracelet from Jofh’s win- 
dow. alleged to have been stolen. The 
thief testified that he had sold a quantity 
of jewelry which he had pilfered to JotF 
for $5. and that he had previously taken 
the stuff to other places where it was 
tested, and where he was offered |16, 
which he refused to take for fear he would 
be arrested. Jofti refused to make any 
statement regarding his alleged dealings 
with the prisoner, and was held in $600 
bail for trial by ^Magistrate Cunningham. 


A. J. Davidson, a M'eaverville. Cal., jew- 
eler, with the assistance of Assemblyman 
J. A. Hubbard, is hot after the Paris com 
mission of his State, and in particular Var- 
ney W. Gaskill. the commission’s interest- 
ing secretary. Mr. Davidson loaned hi 
big gold nugget, which was celebrated al 
over northern California, to Gaskill to ex- 
I'libit at Paris, and only a part of it came 
home again. He claims he can get no satis- 
factory explanation from Gaskill and de- 
mands that his conduct be investigated. 



Providence. 


Lange & Fischer are preparing to move * 
from 46 Garnet St. to 67 Friendship St. 

G. W. Tucker has begun business as a ,, 
manufacturer in the shop at the rear of 
235 Eddy St. 

Among the officers of the newly or- i 
ganized Oxford Club of this city are: 
Harry Cutler, of the Cutler Jewelry Co.; 
David Bernkopf, of Leeder & 'Bernkopf, 
and Benedict B. Lederer, of S. & B. 
Lederer Co. 

Included in the imports from foreign 
countries received at the port of Provi- • 
dence during the past week were the fol- 
lowing:' From Bremen, 12 packages of 
imitation precious stones; from Havre, ' 
one package of imitation precious stones, 
one package of glass stones. , 

George X. Kingsbury, executive super- , 
intendent of the Rhode Island Commis- ■ 
sioners to the Pan-American Exposition, • 
states that the Gorham Mfg. Co. have 
been assigned one of the most desirable i 
locations on the exhibition grounds at f 
Buffalo. The Brown & Sharpe Mfg. Co. ’ 
have also been fortunate in the amount of 
space allotted to them. 

Heath, Such & Co. are a new firm of ' 
jewelers’ tool makers who have started 
in business at 283 Thurber’s Ave. The 
members of the firm are Thomas Heath, p 
who has had some years’ experience in ‘ 
the employ of the Gorham Mfg. Co., and 
Charles H. Such, who for the past 10 years 
was an employe of the H. A. Kirby Co., 
and previous to that was with Dutee 
Wilcox. 


While the banquet was in progress » 
Friday evening, a little anxiety was caused 
by the fact that a double alarm of fire 
had been sounded from box 233, which' ' 
has been rung for more than one fire in 
the jewelry district. It was soon learned, 
however, that the fire was confined to the 
building at the corner of Weybosset and 
Eddy Sts. and the Amasa Mason building • 
adjoining on Eddy St. The only jewelry 
ahop to suffer loss was that of P. Crossin 
& Co., in the latter building, a small smoke 
and water damage being caused there. ^ 


The following new members have been *' 
elected by the board of governors of the 
New England ^Manufacturing Jewelers’ 
and Silversmiths’ Association since the t 
last meeting: William P. Chapin. Thomas^ 

F. Kilkenney. Walter E. Smith, Arthur 
Henius. Charles W. Battey. Ora E. Case, 

F. V. Kennon. James Smith, George A. ' 
Cahoone, David Bernkopf, Harvey Hues- 1 
tis, George W. Hutchison, S. J. Greene, 

J. M. Frazer, P. Wunderle, Charles D. 
Waite. H. A. Lincoln, J. B. Richardson, 

J. Parker Ford, A. S. Cumerford, George: 

R. Clarke, Calvin Dean and Alfred' 
Krower, all of Providence: W. H. Garner,! 

E. A, Fargo, Frank Mossberg. William] 

E. Rounsville. II. L. Perry, George L.j 
Shepardson, E. E. Rhodes, Harold E.' 
Sweet, Fred. L. Torrey, X. Justin Smith, 

W. A. Engley, L. W. Teed, E. D. Gil-S 
more. Ezekiel Blake, S. M. Einstein, Wil-;^ 
Ham H, Blake and R. Macdonald. of| 
Attleboro; H. H. Curtis, of North Attle- 
boro; E. E. Thomas, Jr., of Attleboro 
Falls: William F. Maintein, of Plainville; 

E. A. Lewis, of Waterbury, Conn., and 
L. P. Sturtevant, of Swansea, Mass. 


February 20, 1901. 


THE JEWELERS’ CIRCULAR-WEEKLY. 


33 


Attleboro. 

Fontneau & Cook, Attleboro Falls, are 
looking for suitable quarters to move very 
soon to Attleboro. 

Winthrop F. Barden, of Chapman & Bar- 
den, resident in Attleboro, is to attend a 
session of the national grand lodge of the 
American Benefit Society on the 27th. 

A special train bore the jewelers of the 
Attleboros to Providence, last Friday, for 
the annual banquet of the New England 
Manufacturing Jewelers and Silversmiths’ 
Association. 

The local caucuses are on foot this week. 
J. Thomas Inman, of J. T. Inman & Co. ; 
Alfred R. Crosby, of Smith & Crosby, and 
Thomas E. McCaffrey, of P. J. Cummings 
& Co., will preside at the three caucuses. 

Announcement is made of the incorpora- 
tion of the Bay State Tap & Die Co., of 
Taunton, a concern in mechanical lines 
which ally them to the jewelry business. 
The incorporators are Louis A. Lincoln, 
Alfred L. Lincoln and Herbert C. Wood. 
The company have a paid in capitalization 
of $5,000. 

Charles A. Marsh, of C. A. Marsh & Co., 
left, last week, for a southern tour, part 
business, part pleasure, accompanied by 
Mrs. Marsh. James E. Blake, of the James 
E. Blake Co., with Mrs. Blake, left with the 
Raymond & Whitcomb excursion from 
Boston for the Mardi Gras and southern 
California. At the home of William H. 
Garner, of the Dunbar, Leach, Garner Co., 
a very brilliant farewell party was given the 
Blakes. , 


B. F. Rodgers Brings Suit Against His 
Former Partner. 

Louisville, Ky., Eeb. 13. — Benjamin F. 
Rodgers, formerly of Rodgers & Pottinger, 
last week filed suit against Thomas J. 
Pottinger, who was also a member of the 
old firm. Mr. Rodgers sues to have an 
agreement to arbitrate the differences be- 
tween himself and Mr. Pottinger in regard 
to the value of Rodgers’s stock in the firm 
enforced. 

Some time ago the partners disagreed 
and it was decided by them that it would be 
best for one to retire. Accordingly, Rodg- 
ers agreed to sell out to Pottinger. A sec- 
ond disagreement arose over the value of 
Rodgers’s stock in the company. Pottinger 
placed the value at $2,000, but Rodgers 
thought it was worth more. A proposition 
to arbitrate was agreed on, and Pottinger 
paid the $2,000 down and deposited $1,000 
additional in the hands of the Hon. Augus- 
tus E. Wilson as an evidence of good faith. 
A third person was to be selected as the 
arbitrator. In his petition filed in the Cir- 
cuit Clerk's office Mr. Rodgers avers that 
since that time Pottinger has refused to 
submit the matter to an outside and disin- 
terested man for the purpose of arbitration, 
and he asks that the Court enforce the 
agreement made by him with Mr. Pottinger. 


J. H. Windom and M. A. Crowley, of 
Smithville, Tenn., were in New York, re- 
cently, to dispose of a pearl found by a fish- 
erman at the mouth of Sink Creek, Caney 
Fork River, Tenn. They claimed the pearl 
to weigh 104 grains, to be sky blue in color, 
perfectly round and worth $2,700. 


North Attleboro. 

John C. Cody, North Attleboro, father of 
John W. Cody, of Smith & Crosby, died 
last week. 

Harry Robinson has succceeded to the 
position of foreman for FI. F. Barrows & 
Co., vacated by the death of the late John B. 
Peck. 

Joseph Brady, with Maintien Bros. & El- 
liot, was thrown from a sleigh, last week, 
by a runaway horse, but, fortunately, was 
not seriously hurt. 

A sale of real estate affecting the town as 
well as the jewelry business took place, 
Feb. 13. The group of jewelry factories in 
Attleboro Falls, the southern village of 
North Attleboro, owned and partly occupied 
by B. S. Freeman & Co., was sold at public 
auction to Ezra Marble, a Boston real estate 
dealer, for -$16,500. A mortgage on the es- 
tate was held by the North Attleboro bank, 
but was lately transferred to the heirs of 
the late John Howard Eallon, of Provi- 
dence, J. H., Dalton and Emma Fallon. The 
terms of the document not being fidfilled, 
the safe took place, and there were two bid- 
ders, Mr. Marble bettering the first bid by 
$300 and getting the estate. There is one 
very large three-story factory building, 
with three smaller buildings, each able to 
shelter two good-sized firms, standing be- 
side it. 


Death of Emil Kolb. 

Philadelphia, Pa., Feb. 16. — Emil Kolb, 
eldest son of G. F. Kolb, one of the pioneer 
jewelry case manufacturers of this city, 
who founded the firm of G. F. Kolb & 
Sons, 732 Sansom St., died at his home on 
E. York St., Kensington, Thursday, Feb. 7, 
and was buried Sunday. Mr. Kolb was for- 
merly in partnership with his brother, Eu- 
gene Kolb, trading under the firm name of 
G. F. Kolb’s Sons, 732 Sansom St. The 
brothers dissolved partnership about two 
years ago, Eugene Kolb buying out his 
brother’s interest and continuing the busi- 
ness at 732 Sansom St., while Emil Kolb 
started a jewelry case factory in Kensing- 
ton. Both brothers had a lucrative trade. 
Emil Kolb was the patentee of Kolb’s ad- 
justable silver chest, which now has an ex- 
tensive sale. The business will be carried 
on at the York St. factory by Mr. Kolb’s 
eldest son. 

Death of Daniel M. Collins. 

Daniel M. Collins, a well known jeweler 
in Brooklyn, New York, at 425 Fulton St., 
died, Sunday, at his home, 412 Sackett St., 
of pneumonia. Mr. Collins was born at 
Lima, N. Y., 36 years ago, and graduated 
from the Genesee Normal Institute and the 
Genesee Wesleyan Institute. He then en- 
tered the employ of the J. R. White Jew- 
elry Co., Rochester, afterward becoming 
their manager, which position he held for a 
number of years. He started the business 
in Brooklyn several years ago. He was well 
known in secret and benevolent society cir- 
cles, being a member of Brooklyn Lodge of 
Elks, Knights of Columbus and Royal Ar- 
canum. He was also prominent in the 
Booth Dramatic Society. His widow, Sadie 
Brooks Collins, survives him, as do two 
young sons. The funeral services will be 
held at his late home, this morning, with a 
mass afterward in St. Ag'^es’ Roman 
Catholic Church. 


Bill to Regulate Sale of Spectacles and 
Eyeglasses. 

■ Olympia, Wash., Feb. 12. — The following 
bill has been introduced in the upper house 
of the State Legislature, now in session in 
this city, by W. W. Wilshire, a Republican 
lawyer of Seattle, at the instance of a num- 
ber of Seattle jewelers: 

AN ACT 

REGULATING THE SALE OF SPECTACLES AND EYE- 
GLASSES, PROVIDING FOR LICENSING THE 
SAME, AND PRESCRIBING A PENALTY FOR 
THE VIOLATION THEREOF. 

Be it enacted by the Legislature of the State of 
Washington : 

Section 1. It shall be unlawful for any person 
to peddle, sell or offer for sale or barter, any spec- 
tacles or eyeglasses, as an article of merchandise, 
from any boat, wagon, cart or other vehicle of any 
kind, or from any pack, basket or other package 
carried on foot, or from a pocket of his clothing, 
without having first obtained a license so to do 
from the county auditor of the county in which 
said merchandise is sold or to be offered for sale 
or barter; Provided, This act shall not be con- 
strued to apply to any person selling spectacles or 
eyeglasses in his regular established place of busi- 
ness, nor to administrators or executors selling 
property of deceased persons at public or private 
sale. 

Sec. 2. The county auditors of the respective 
counties in this State are hereby anthorized and 
required to issue to any applicant therefor a li- 
cense to sell or peddle spectacles or eyeglasses, as 
an article of merchandise, from any traveling 
boat, wagon, cart or any kind of vehicle, or from 
any pack, basket or package carried on foot, or 
from a pocket of the clothing, in any of the in- 
corporated cities or towns and elsewhere in such 
county, outside of the regular established place 
of business of such applicant, within this State, 
for the period of time to be specified in such li- 
cense, upon payment by such applicant of a license 
fee of five dollars per day for the number of days 
for which such license is issued. 

Sec. 3. Any person violating the provisions of 
this act shall be deemed guilty of a misdemeanor, 
and upon conviction thereof shall, for each offense, 
be punished by a fine of not less than $20 nor more 
than $100, or by imprisonment in the county jail 
for a term of 30 days, or by both such fine and 
imprisonment. 


Death of Wellington W. Washburn. 

Galesburg, 111., Feb. 13. — Wellington 
W. Washburn, a prominent resident of thia 
city, who died Feb. 8 and was buried Sun- 
day, was for nearly a quarter of a century 
in the jewelry business and was for many 
years well known as a jeweler of this city. 
Air. Washburn was born in Akron, O., 
Sept. 18, 1836, where he lived until his 
education was completed. After leaving 
high school in 1852 he entered a jeweler’.s 
store to learn the watchmaker’s and jew- 
eler’s trade, remaining in that position 
until 1859, when he came to Galesburg. 
His first co-partnership was with J. K. 
Armstrong, from 1867 to 1872, under the 
firm name of Washburn & Armstrong. 
He continued in the jewelry business until 
April, 1875, when he sold out to E. W. 
Trask, of Aurora. Later, in 1877, Mr. 
Washburn was elected cashier in the Sec- 
ond National bank of Galesburg, and in 
1883 he organized the Galesburg National 
bank, of which he was elected first presi- 
dent. In Alay, 1889, business called him to 
California. In Alay, 1895, he returned to 
Galesburg, where his home has been ever 
since. 


Arthur Totten, formerly with Rogers & 
Bro. ,and recently with E. Ira Richards A 
Co., has just accepted a position as traveler 
witli Larter, Elcox & Co., New York. 


34 


THE JEWELERS’ CIRCULAR-WEEKLY. 


February 20, 1901. 


WALTHAM WATCHES. 

16 Size, S. W., '99 Model, Pendant Setting. 

HUNTING OR OPEN FACE. 


RIVERSIDE MAXIMUS, Nickel; 

2 1 Diamond and Ruby Jewels; Two Pairs Diamond Caps; Both Balance Pivots running on 
Diamonds; Raised Gold Settings; Jewel Pin Set without Shellac; Double Roller Escapement; 
Steel Escape Wheel; Exposed Pallets; Compensating Balance, Accurately Adjusted to Tempera- 
ture, Isochronism and Five Positions, and Carefully Timed ; Patent Breguet Hairspring, Hardened 
and Tempered in Form; Patent Micrometric Regulator ; Tempered Steel Safety Barrel; Exposed 
Winding Wheels; Gold Train; Fine Glass Hand-Painted Dial of Most Modern and Artistic Design. 
The superior construction of this movement adapts it to the most exacting service. 

RIVERSIDE, Nickel; 

17 Fine Ruby Jewels; Raised Gold Settings; Double Roller Escapement; Steel Escape Wheel; 
Exposed Pallets; Compensating Balance, Adjusted to Temperature and Three Positions; Patent 
Breguet Hairspring, Hardened and Tempered in Form; Patent Micrometric Regulator; Tempered 
Steel Safety Barrel; Exposed Winding Wheels; Red Gold Centre Wheel. 

ROYAL, Nickel; 

17 Jewels; Red Gold Settings; Exposed Pallets ; Compensating Balance, Adjusted to Temperature ; 
Patent Breguet Hairspring, Hardened and Tempered in Form; Patent Micrometric Regulator; 
Tempered Steel Safety Barrel; Exposed Winding Wheels; Red Gold Centre Wheel. 

No. 630, Nickel; 

17 Jewels; Red Gilded Settings; Exposed Pallets; Compensating Balance, Adjusted to Tempera- 
ture; Patent Breguet Hairspring, Hardened and Tempered in Form; Patent Micrometric Regu- 
lator; Tempered Steel Safety Barrel; Exposed Winding Wheels; Red Gilded Centre Wheel. 

No. 620, Nickel; 

15 Jewels; Settings; Exposed Pallets; Cut Expansion Balance; Patent Breguet Hairspting, 
Hardened and Tempered in Form; Patent Micrometric Regulator; Tempered Steel Safety Barrel; 
Exposed Winding Wheels; Polished and Red Gilded Centre Wheel and Jewel Settings. 

No. 610, Nickel; 

7 Jewels; Exposed Pallets; Cut Expansion Balance; Patent Breguet Hairspring,' Hardened and 
Tempered in Form; Tempered Steel Safety Barrel; Exposed Winding Wheels. 


Manufactured and Warranted by 

AMERICAN WALTHAM WATCH CO. 

WALTHAM, MASS. 


35 


February 20, 1901. THE JEWELERS’ CIRCULAR-WEEKLY. 


t^^^JEWELERS’ 
CIRCULAR 

UOROLOGICAL RBVIBW. 

PUBLISHED EVERY WEDNESDAY BY 

THE JEWELERS’ CIRCULAR PUB’G CO., 

Corbin Building. 1 1 John St., Cor. Broadway, 
New York. 



O ' 

■ 

Anti-Department- 


iNCE more the 
lOpponentis o f 
department stores in 

Store Lcgrslatlon. 

souri are endeavoring to legislate them 
out of existence or to so hedge them about 
with obstructions as to make their career 
anything but easy sailing on a calm sea. 
In the 41st General Assembly of that 
State has been introduced “An act to regu- 
late business and trade in cities having a 
population of 50,000 or over, declaring it 
unlawful and making it a misdemeanor 


jelephone: cable address: 

1148 CORTLANDT. JEWLAR. NEW YORK 


Vol. XLII. Feb. 20, 1901. No. 3. 


A JOURNAL DEVOTED TO THE INTERESTS OF JEW- 
ELERS, WATCHMAKERS, SILVERSMITHS, ELECTRO- 
FLATE MANUFACTURERS, AND ALL ENGAGED IN 
KINDRED BRANCHES OF INDUSTRY. 


Member of the American Trade Press Association 


Our editorial columns will contain our own 
opinions only, and we will present in other col- 
umns only what we consider of interest or value 
to our readers. Advertising matter will not be 
printed as news. 

Advertising rates in The Jewelers’ Circular- 
Weekly are lower, considering the number of 
tradesmen reached by its large circulation, than 
in any other jewelry journal. 

Notices of changes in standing advertisements 
must be received one week in advance; new mat- 
ter can be received up to Monday. 


INFORMATION FOR SUBSCRIBERS. 


to transact business in violation of the 
provisions thereof, and providing a pen- 
alty for such violation; providing for the 
appointment of license commissioners in 
such cities, prescribing their powers, 
defining their duties and fixing their com- 
pensation.’’ The act segregates all 
branches of trade into classes numbered 
from 1 to 76, which in their turn are 
gathered into groups lettered from A to 
V. If the act becomes a law it “shall be 
unlawful for any person or persons, firm 
or corporation or association of persons, to 
have on hand, exposed for sale, or to offer 
for sale or to sell in the same store, build- 
ing or premises, or in connected stores, 
buildings or premises, under a unit of 
management or superintendency or other- 
wise, at retail, any articles, goods, wares 
or merchandise of more than one of the 


Terms of Subscription, Postage Prepaid. 

per annum. 


several groups in Division Two, de- 
scribed in Section One, without first hav- 


Unlted States and Canada, . - - $2.00 

Foreign Countries in Postal Union, • 4.00 

England and Colonies, ... 16s. 

France and Switzerland, - - - 20 fr. 

Germany, . - - - - 16 marks 

Single Copies, ..... .10 


New Subscribers can commence at any time. 

Payments for The Jewelers’ Circular-Weekly, 
when sent by mail, should be made in a Post-Office 
Money Order, Bank Check or Draft, or an Ex- 
press Money Order or Registered Letter. All post- 
masters are required to register letters whenever 
requested to do so. 

Pay money only to authorized collectors having 
proper credentials. 

Returning Copies. Returning your paper will not 
enable us to discontinue it, as we cannot find your 
name on our books unless your address is given. 

Changing Address. In changing address always 
give the old as well as the new one. Your name 
cannot be found on our books unless this is done. 

Discontinuances. We will continue to send 
papers until there is a specific order to stop, in 
connection with which all arrearages must be paid; 
but such an order can be given at any time, to 
take effect at or after the expiration of the sub- 
scription. All such orders will be promptly ac- 
knowledged by mail. 

Liability. The courts have decided that all sub- 
scribers to journals are responsible until arrear- 
ages are paid in full and an order to discontinue 
has been received by the publisher. 


The JEWELERS’ CIRCULAR-WEEKLY 
IN EUROPE. 

Among the places in Europe where It Is on file are the 
following: 

LONDON — First Ave. Hotel, Holborn, E. C. ; Hol- 
born Viaduct Hotel, Royal Hotel. 

PARIS — Hotel de L’Athene, Rue Scribe. 

LEIPZIG — Handels-Zeitung fur die gesamte Uhren 
Industrie. 

BERLIN — Deutsche Uhrmacher Zeitung, Jager 
Strasse, 73. 

GENEVA — Journal Suisse D’Horlogerie. 

AMSTERDAM — Continental Club, Hotel Amstel. 
ANTWERP — Diamond Club, Rue de Pelican. 


Every line of reading matter in THE 
JEWELERS’ CIKCULAR-'WEEKI.T, with the 
exception of a few brief extracts from ex- 
changes, always properly credited, is written 
exclusiv ely f or this journal. Each issue of 
THE JEWELERS’ CIRCULAR- WEEKLY is 
copyrighted. Permission to quote is extended 
to other publications provided such quota- 
tions ivre properly credited. 


ing obtained a license therefor as herein- 
after provided.’’ 

The group that principally interests the 
jewelry industry is Group E, Jewelry 
Classes 17, 18, 19. The^e classes com- 
prise watches, clocks and jewelers’ find- 
ings and optical goods; jewelry and gold 
and silver mounted goods; gold and gold 
plated goods, silver and silver plated 
goods, bronzes, diamonds and precious 
stones, umbrellas, parasols and canes, 
statuary and glassware. This is a fairly 
comprehensive list of the merchandise of 
the modern jewelry store, and evinces a 
careful investigation of the character of 
the stock of such a store as well as an 
inquiry among jewelers and suggestions 
from such dealers as to the proper sched- 
ule to be embodied in the proposed law. 
Yet we note in Class 14 traveling equip- 
ments, toilet cases, fancy leather work; 
in Class 43, art work, china, metal or 
wood; in Class 45, cutlery; in Class 46, 
lamps; in Class 68, instruments of pre- 
cision for experiment and research; in 
Class 69, chronometric and thermometric 
articles and fancy notions; in Class 70, 
musical merchandise, in which musical 
boxes would, of course, be included. All 
of these lines are carried to a greater or 
lesser extent by the up-to-date jewelry 
and optical store. TIow much taxes the 
proprietor of such a store would have to 
pay, to be within the letter of the law, 
would be an interesting calculation for 
the license commissioner; for, says the 
act, the commissioner “shall charge and 
collect from the applicant to whom said 
license is issued, the sum of five hundred 
($500) dollars for each and every group 
named in the application for said license, 
by the selecting therefrom of all or any 
of the articles therein contained, being in 
addition to the group in the application 


mentioned as the principal business of the 
applicant; provided, when an article or 
articles are found in two or more groups, 
other than the group under which the ap- 
plicant conducts or desires to conduct his 
principal business, it shall be necessary 
to secure only one license to sell said 
article or articles.” 

The promoters of this act proclaim it 
as being entirely different to the one 
passed by the 40th General Assembly but 
which was subsequently declared by the 
courts unconstitutional. The career of 
the present act will be followed with in- 
terest. 


Further Resolutions Over the Death of 
Joseph B. Bowden. 

At a meeting of the executive commit- 
tee of the Jewelers’ McKinley and Roose- 
velt Club, held Feb. 11, at the office of 
the Keystone Watch Case Co., New 
York, resolutions expressing their sorrow 
at the death of Joseph B. Bowden, the 
late president of the Club, were passed, 
and a committee of three were appointed, 
consisting of Col. John L. Shepherd, of the 
Keystone Watch Case Co., Charles F. 
Brinck, of the Crescent Watch Case Co., 
and John Frick, to draft suitable resolutions 
and have them handsomely engrossed 
in the form of a folio volume for presen- 
tation to the family of the deceased. This 
volume will be enclosed in a black seal 
leather box. The resolutions as drafted 
by the committee and passed by the execu- 
tive committee, are as follows : 

Whereas, The members of the executive com- 
mittee of the Jewelers’ McKinley and Roosevelt 
Club, expressing the opinion of all the members of 
the Club, are profoundly impressed by Ac recent 
melancholy event of the death of their friend, 
associate and president, Joseph B. Bowden, and 
aside from the renewed warning thus given them 
of the uncertainty of human life, the executive 
committee gratefully record their sincere respect 
for the excellent character of Mr. Bowden, as well 
in all private and personal relations as in the pub- 
lic aspect of his life for tht many years that he 
was interested in Presidential elections, haying 
been the President of the Jewelers’ Republican 
Clubs for the years of 1884-1888-1896-1900.^ 

And that he was distinguished by his unremit- 
ting attention to, and enthusiastic interest in the 
efforts of what he believed to be, his political 
duties and for the best interest of his country. 

As a merchant of life-long existence among the 
jewelers, extending beyond a quarter of a century, 
he sustained an irreproachable reputation for in- 
tegrity, honorable dealing, and his career was 
crowned with success. 

Resolved, That we most respectfully tender to 
the family of Mr. Bowden this expression of our 
most profound sympathy. _ .... 

Signed by Charles L. Tiffany, first vice-president, 
David C. Dodd, second vice-president; A. K- bloan, 
third vice-president; John L. Shepherd, chairman 
executive committee; William F. Ackerman, secre 
tary; Charles F. Wood, treasurer, and members ot 
. 1 . _ 


Edward Carmichael has succeeded O. A. 
Pease, Onawa, 111. 

The stock of jewelry at Mount Sterling, 
111., owned by Ed. Parson has been de- 
stroyed by fire. 

C. E. Davis, Sylvester, Mich., has pur- 
chased the jewelry stock and repair out- 
fit of Charles Burdick, Mecosta, and is 


low located in that town. 

J L Brandies & Sons have incorporated 
in Omaha, Neb., for a department store 
business, with a capital stock of $350,000, 
liovp a verv complete jewelry de- 


partment. 


np 


February 20, 1901. 


THE JEWELERS’ CIRCULAR-WEEKLY. 



Traveling representative® 
may consider these colnmns 
open for the pnblication of 
any news or items of inter- 
est regarding themselves or 
their confreres. 

Clarence Rudolph, 
formerly of Massil- 
lon, O., is with God- 
dard, Hill & Co, 

Pittsburgh, Pa. He 
started out. Monday, 
on a western trip. 
Travelers in Pitts- 
burgh, Pa., last week were: Charles B. Bart- 
lett, Whiting Mfg. Co.: F. Van Olinda, New 

England Watch Co.; H. C. Barnum, Shafer 

& Douglas; S. W. Abbey. E. Ira Richards 
i: Co.; S. E. Coggins, Towle Mfg. Co.; Mr. 
Washbourne, Graf, Washbourne & Dunn; E. 

-\. Porter, International Silver Co.; Walter 

S. Noon, W. F. Cory & Bro. ; C. N. Per- 
ley, .-Mling & Co.; William J. Behan, Newark 
Tortoise Shell Novelty Co.; Addison W . Rau- 
baud. Day, Clark & Co.; A. W. Levy. Byron L. 
Strasburger & Co.; F. V. Ettlinger, Louis Ett- 
linger & Sons; George W. Wagoner, Wilcox 
& Wagoner; W. I'. Cody, Blakcman & Hen- 

derson; George R. Angus. Goodnow & Jenks; 
E. Lange, P. W. I^mbert & Co.; Lawrence IT. 
Smith, Bipparl, Griscom & Osborn; E. A. Reed, 
Reed & Barton; A. N. Dorchester, Chapin & 
Hollister Co.; E. LaVigne, Mathey Bros., 

-Mathez & Co.; W. R. Eliot, International Silver 
Co.; J. F. Dear, Reed & Barton; M. Kohn, 


Silbermann & Co.; C. G. Perry, Ripley-Howland 
Mfg. Co.; J. W. AIcClannin, International Silver 
Co.; P. M. Layman, Riker Bros.; !■'. C. Stan 
dinger, Sansbury & Nellis; H. D. Meyer, A. J. 
Hedges & Co.; J. Williams, for G. Armeny; 
.\rthur Bradshaw, International Silver Co. ; Harry 
Osborne, R. Wallace & Sons Mfg. Co.; Simon 
Goldsmith, Solidarity Watch Case Co. ; C. II. 
Higbee, II. !•'. Barrows & Co. 

S. D. Binge, S. & B. Lederer Co., was regis- 
tered at the Iroquois, Buffalo, N. Y., last week. 

Traveling salesmen who visited Boston, Mass., 
last week were: Irving L. Russell, L. Tannen- 

baum & Co. ; Mr. Stevens, Americ-in Optical Co ; 
Mr. Wilkinson, C. A. Wilkinson & Co.; O. D. 
Eveleigh, Eveleigh Optical Co. 

Among the traveling salesmen who were in Den- 
ver, Col., the past week were: George B. Ross, 

Robert II. Ingersoll & Bro. ; George G. Gubbins,, 
Illinois Watch Co.; H. C. Rowbothan, C. P. 
Goldsmith & Co.; Jlr. Price, Byron L. Stras- 
burger & Co.; S. Schimmel, Sussfeld, Lorsch & 
Co., and Mr. Cutter, general manager of the Elgin 
National Watch Co. 

The jewelers of Portland, Ore., were interviewed 
by the following travelers the past week: W'. L. 

Mason. Hayden W^ Wheeler & Co.; Lee Hirsch, 
Louis Kaufman & Co.; W’. A. Weiohmann, repre 
senting Frank W. Smith; Mr. Parker, Osmun- 
Parker Mfg. Co.; J. Leudan, A. Eisenberg & Co.; 
L. F. Starks, representing W^illiam B. Glidden, 
and Sydney W'einshenk, for .\lphonse Judis. 

Travelers who called upon the Indianapolis, 
Ind., trade last week included: A. Kiersky, A. 

L. Reed & Co.; John Marsh, C. A. Marsh & Co.; 
.Arthur Bradshaw, Meriden Britannia Co.; M. L. 
Barnard, J. B. Bowden & Co.; Mr. Wolff, Eisler 
& Laubheim; E. Smith, for E. H. II. Smith; 
E. A. Tyler, The Ansonia Clock Co.; W^ J. Le 
Moin, The Ames-Bonner Co.; H. D. Sherrill, 
Sinnock & Sherrill; G. W. Bleecker, Martin, 
Copeland &: Co.; Harry Kennion, Parks Bros. 
& Rogers. 

Traveling men calling on Davenport. la., jew- 
elers the past week were: Sam Kunstadter, J. 

Floersheim, Kunstadter & Co.; Louis Freund, 
Henry Freund & Bro. ; K. J. Bemis, International 
Silver Co.; J. M. Morrow, American W'atch Case 
Co.; George H. Wright, Unger Bros.; F. 


ON MEMORANDUM 





Cross & Beguelin 


Importers and Cutters of Diamonds and Precious Stones 

43 Ru. de Me.lay, PARIS 2i8s‘cJluandt H MutdeU LUHe , NFW YORK 


Thompson, Derby Silver Co.; W. F'. Adams, 
Simpson, Hall, Miller & Co,; Ferguson Mead, 
International Silver Co.; W'. H. Bryant, T. G. 
Hawkes & Co.; A. E. Binkley, for John W. R. 
Harding; Harry S. .\icher, and representative of 
M. Lippett & Co. 

Among the travelers in St. Louis, Mo., last 
week were: W'illiam Pfleuger, Joseph Noterman 

& Co. ; Sol. H. Veit, Henry F'roehlich & Co.; H. 
M. Carle, Keystone Watch Case Co.; C. C. 
Offerman, William Smith & Co. ; Charles Whit- 
ing, Whiting & Davis; Fred. L. Pettee, Water- 
bury Clock Co.; Seymour W. Frolichstein, Fro- 
lichsteiu & England; A. Kiersky, A. L. Reed 
Co.; A. E. La Vigne, Mathey Bros., Mathez 
& Co.; Fred. G. Gruen, D. Graen & Sons; C. H. 
Anderson, Allsopp Bros.; M. L. Barnard, J. B. 
Bowden & Co., and S. A. Goldsmith, A. Gold- 
smith & Son. 

The traveling men representing eastern firms 
who called on the Kansas City, Mo., jewelry trade 
last week were: J. M. Morrow, American Watch 
Case Co. ; F. Thompson, Derby Silver Co. ; Wil- 
liam Rosenberger, A. Wallach & Co. ; R. L. 
Kintz, E. G. Webster & Son"; F. D. Newberger, 
R. Blackinton & Co.; Fred. J. Foster, Unger 
Bros.; II. B. Rogers, N. E. Whiteside & Co.; 
M. Klipper. Hipp. Didisheim & Bro. ; F. D. 
Smith, Reeves & Browne; I. L. Friedman, L. 
Adler & Son; A. M. Hurd, Seth Thomas Clock 
Co.; F. L. Carpenter, Frank M. Whiting & Co.; 

D. Schwab, Ciner & Seeleman; and A. Vreitz- 
felder, for Manasseh Levy. 

Among the traveling salesmen who recently 
passed through Detroit, Mich., were: F. R. Krug- 
ler. The H. A. Kirby Co.; R. H. Schley, Sloan & 
Co.; C. G. Perry, The Ripley-Howland Mfg. Co.; 
Addison W. Raubaud. Day, Clark & Co. ; C. .\I. 
Dillon, The Meriden Cutlery Co.; II. D. Cretcher. 
Hayden W. Wheeler & Co.; George A. Stockder, 
J. D. Bergen Co. ; F. L. Pettee, Waterbury 
Clock Co.; H. C. Barnum. Shafer & Douglas; Theo. 
G. Walpuski, American Morocco Case Co.; Wal- 
ter S. Noon, W. F. Cory & Bro.; Max Gunzbur- 
ger, Lissauer & Co.; S. L. Griffin, C. F. Rumpp 
& Sons; Fred. Casper, The Mauser Mfg. Co.; F. 
C. Jackson, for William Davidson; F. S. Howard, 
Towle Mfg. Co. 

The following representatives of eastern whole- 
salers were in Minneapolis and St. Paul, Minn., 
the nast week: F. H. Horton, Carter, Hastings 
& Howe; Will Gregory, Strobell & Crane; Mr. 
Perley, Ailing & Co.; Fred. Foster, Unger Bros.; 
Mr. Clark, The Towle Mfg. Co.; R. H. Schley, 
Sloan & Co.; D. Schwab; Mr. Sherrard, 
Enos Richardson & Co.; II. B. Rogers, N. 

E. Whiteside & Co.; Mr. Jacobs, Homan Sil- 
ver Plate Co.; Mr. Myers, Queen City Silver 
Plate Co.; Mr. Kunstadter, J. Floersheim, Kun- 
stadter & Co.; ilr. Smith, W. D. Earle & Co.; 
Mr. Kintz, E. G. Webster & Son. and representa- 
tives of T. A. Wright & Co. and Martin, Copeland 
& Co. ■ 

Calling on Svracuse. N. ^ .. jewelers the past 
week were: S. D. Binge, S. & B. Lederer Co.; 
A W. Bogart, Waterbury Clock Co.; J. N. Beck- 
with, Beckwith, Grant & Co.; Benjamin Wester- 
velt, New England Watch Co., S. i*!: A. Borg- 
zinner and Van Bergh Silver Plate Co.: W. H. 
Pullman, E. A. Lehmann & Co. ; Percy D. Lucas. 
The Mauser ilfg. Co.; S. Glenn Walmsley, for 
Hermann Baum: A. E. Alexander. Simpson, 
Hall, Miller & Co.; -Mr. Wagner, Wagner ilfg. 
Co.; Herman Meyers, for Zach. A. Oppenheimer; 
E. F, Skinner, Henry Ginnel & Co.; H. B. 
Crawford, S. Sternau & Co.; F'. P. Babcock. 
Newark Tortoise Shell Novelty Co.; II. C. Bar- 
num, Shafer & Douglas: .\ddison W. Raubaud, 
Day. Clark & Co.; Fred. S. Eason. N. II. White 
8c Co.; H. Allyn Parker, Gebhardt & Parker; 
C. C. Rosenberg, W. H. Terhune & Co. M. 
Freed & Co. and M. J. .\verbeck were also repre- 
sented. 


Jewelers’ Gold Bars Withdrawn and Ex- 
changed. 

IVeck Ended Feb, IG, 1901. 

The U. S. -\ssay Office report: 

Gold bars exchanged for gold coin $195.9^ 14 

Gold bars paid depositors 113. lOO 95 

Total $309.6(1 09 

Of this the gold bars exchanged for gold coin are 
reported by the Sub-Treasury as follows : • 

Feb. 11 $35,267 

“ -iQ ^,775 

« u 52.820 

« 15 41.106 

" 16.'.' 

Total 51?5.968 




February 20, 1901. 


THE JEWELERS’ CIRCULAR-WEEKLY. 


37 


New York Notes. 

David Livingston, bookkeeper for Good- 
friend Bros., who was married recently, has 
established his home at 34 W. 113th St. 

S. Glenn Walmsley, of Brooklyn, well 
known to the irade, was married, Wednes- 
day last, to Miss Lila T. Morse, of Manhat- 
tan. 

Charles Cohen, a jewelry peddler, living 
at 207 Harrison Ave., Brooklyn, has been 
reported missing to the police, by his wife. 
He is 42 years old and was not known to 
have much money or jewelry with him. 

William Wiesenberger, formerly a pawn- 
broker at 528 Sixth Ave., and before that 
time a traveling jeweler, who was indicted, 
last June, on four charges of receiving 
stolen goods, and convicted in November, 
has not yet been sentenced. He is in jail 
awaiting the Judge’s action. 

An effort is being made by the importers 
of New York to secure from Congress an 
additional United States Circuit Court 
Judge, in order that the great amount of ac- 
cumulated business now awaiting the action 
of that court may be disposed of. Among 
the 23,150 protests from appraisers’ deci- 
sions, which are awaiting the court’s atten- 
tion, are 3,000 protests involving jewelry. 

The case of Abraham Frackman, formerly 
a retail jeweler at 379 Grand St., against 
whom an involuntary petition in insolvency 
was filed, a month ago, was called in the 
United States District Court, Wednesday. 
Judge Brown ordered adjudication. There 
has been considerable legal controversy over 
this matter, partly on account of the disap- 
pearance of a considerable part of the assets 
of the bankrupt, as told in The Circular- 
Weekly last week. 

Schedules of Louis Maratsky, Hudson, 
N. Y., who filed a petition in bankruptcy, as 
published last week, show the following 
creditors in the jewelry trade: Seth 

Thomas Clock Co., $100; New Haven 


Clock Co., $100; C. T. Anderson, Reading, 
Pa., $100 ; C. A. Van Benschoten, $200 ; 
Waterbury Watch Co., $100; James W. 
Tufts, Boston, $125; John Keller, $300; R., 
L. & M. Friedlander, $120; Dattelbaum & 
Friedman, $122; Attleboro Novelty Co., 
$133. 

A reward of $1,000 has been offered 
for the arrest and conviction of the 
murderer or murderers of Morris Silver- 
man, the jeweler who was found dying 
in his store, at 3056 Third Ave., Manhattan, 
Feb. 5, as told in The Circular-Weekly 
last week. The reward is offered by Mrs. 
Sflverman, who refuses to accept the police 
theory that her husband committed suicide. 
She says he had a good business and no 
reason to kill himself. Silverman, in a few 
moments of consciousness after he was 
found, just before he died, claimed to have 
been hit by burglars who attempted to rob 
his store. 

Jesse T. Hoke, a clerk in John W. Ste- 
venson’s jewelry store, 486 Vanderbilt 
Ave., Brooklyn, was arrested Friday in 
Manhattan, charged with the larceny of 
jewelry worth $1,000 from the store on 
Thursday afternoon. Hoke is 26 years 
old and had been employed by Stevenson 
for a month. Stevenson claims that he 
left the store in Hoke’s charge Thursday 
afternoon. When he returned he found 
that the' clerk had disappeared, taking 
with him the jewelry, consisting of rings, 
bracelets, chains, and several watches, 
among them one valued at $400. The po- 
lice found in Hoke’s possession pawn tick- 
ets and two diamond rings. 

Schedules in bankruptcy of Morris 
Schlesinger, who did business as the Bra- 
zilian Diamond Co., at 248 W. 125th St., 
show liabilities of $1,387 and no assets. He 
turned over all his assets, on Jan. 3, to an 
assignee, and they realized $110. His peti- 
tion in bankruptcy was filed Jan. 5. Among 
the larger creditors are : I. Mann, $297 ; 


George J.. Smith & Co., $123; Morris Gug- 
genheim, $200. Schlesinger was duly ad- 
judicated bankrupt Jan. 31. The first meet- 
ing of the creditors will be held March 8, at 
4 o clock P. M., at the office of Ernest Hall, 
referee in bankruptcy, 64 William St., at 
which time claims may be proved, a trustee 
appointed and the bankrupt examined. 

Schedules in bankruptcy of Alexander 
Backer, jeweler, 371 Eighth Ave., have been 
filed showing liabilities of $3,794 and nom- 
inal assets $2,107, consisting of stock of 
jewelry $1,000, debt due $300, cash $7, safe 
and fixtures $800, mortgaged for $250. 
Among the creditors are: E. & J. Bass, 
$214; R., L. & M. Friedlander, $116; David 
Mayer, $108; Charles Altchul, $219; 
Adolphe Schwob, $274; Conrad Schicker- 
ling, $211. Backer was duly adjudicated 
bankrupt, Jan. 26. The first meeting of the 
creditors will be held, Feb. 28, at the office 
of Macgrane Coxe, referee in bankruptcy, 
63 Wall St., at 11.30 o’clock a. m., when 
claims may be proved, a trustee appointed 
and the bankrupt examined. 

Fifty dollars and M. B. Dunning, with 
William Bardel, 22 Maiden Lane, parted 
company and became reunited under un- 
usual circumstances, last week. Mr. Dun- 
ning, on Feb. 11, drew the half hundred 
from a bank to assist him in passing over 
Lincoln’s birthday anniversary. When he ar- 
rived at his office the $50 was missing. 
Careful search was made, but no trace of 
the money or explanation of its sudden dis- 
appearance could be found. So Mr. Dun- 
ning made up his mind to charge it to profit 
and loss, and passed the holiday. The next 
morning a man entered the office and 
handed Mr. Dunning $50 in bills and a card 
which bore the name of R. J. Rogers, 9 
Maiden Lane, New York representative of 
the Providence house of Lawton, Sherman 
Co., who expressed regret that the holiday 
prevented a sooner return of the money. 
He declined to accept the reward that was 


«... 








C. DORFLINQER & SONS, 

Manufacturers of Fine Glassware. 

EVERYTHING IN PLAIN AND CUT CRYSTAL FOR THE TABLE. 

915 Broadway, NEW YORK. 36 Murray Street. 








1851 . 


1901 . 


The Chatham National Bank, New York. 


CAPITAL STOCK, 
UNDIVIDED PROFITS, 


H. P. DOREMUS, Cashier. 


GEO. M. HARD, President. 


$ 150,000 

980,000 


TV. H. STRAWN, Ass’t Cashier. 








February 20, 1901. 


3S THE JEWELERS’ CIRCULAR-WEEKLY. 


most willingly oflFered. and would take only 
Mr. Dunning's liberal thanks. 

James T. Fisher will hereafter represent 
F. J. Boesse. importer of watch materials, 
tools and supplies, 08 Nassau St. 

R. M. Cohen, for five years with Stern 
Bros. cSc Co.. 68 Nassau St., will hereafter 
represent the Niagara Ring Mfg. Co., 
Buffalo, N. Y.. in western territorj-. 

Laurens B. Bowden, a son, and William 
C. Kimball, a friend, have accepted the trust 
imposed upon them by the will of Joseph B. 
Bowden, and will be the executors of the 
estate. 

George N. Joyce, one of the oldest jew- 
elr>’ houses in the city, for very many years 
under the United States Hotel, at the corner 
of Water and Fulton Sts., will move to the 
Temple Court building, corner of Beekman 
and Nassau Sts., May 1. 

The .American Watch Case Co., whose 
plant was badly injured by fire in the 
building partly occupied by them, have 
rented a new shop in the New York Life 
Insurance building, corner of Elm and 
Leonard Sts. This building, which' is ab- 
solutely fireproof, is said to be one of the 
finest factory buildings in the city. 

Bunde & Upmeyer, Milwaukee, Wis., 
have opened an office at 65 Nassau St., 
where they will make a specialty of deal- 
ing in .\merican pearls. The office will 
be in charge of Henry W. Sowade, who 
has been known to the trade during the 
past 30 years, having been connected for 
13 years with M. Fox & Co., and 15 years 
with Grinberg & Glauber and A. J. Grin- 
berg & Co. 

A bill that will affect jewelry instalment 
dealers, if it becomes a law, is now before 
the New York Legislature. Its purpose is 
to prevent arrest and imprisonment for non- 
payment of instalment debts unless the sum 
due is more than $25. The promotors of 
the bill claim that there have been many in- 
stances where imprisonment has been cruel 
and oppressive, and the arrests made when 
the justice of the claims was questionable. 

The stock in the store of John Schmidt, 
retail jeweler, 159 Myrtle Ave., Brooklyn, 
was damaged by fire and water to the extent 
of about $5,000, last week, and his house- 
hold effects suffered also. He lived in a 
tenement, in which the fire started, over the 
store. About two years ago there was a 
similar fire in the jeweler’s shop and a 
policeman, who rescued the family, was pre- 
sented with a gold watch and chain by the 
grateful jeweler. 

Louis Lilienthal, who describes himself 
as an agent, residing at 306 W. 113th St., 
Monday filed a petition in bankruptcy 
with liabilities of $3.3,203 and no assets. 
There are only three creditors, viz.: Lin- 
denbaum & Weil, of London, $26,633, for 
goods sold to him on Jan. 1, 1900; Bruhl 


Freres, Paris, $6,270, for balance of an 
account contracted in New York in 1895 
and 1896, and Dr. William Hirsch, $300, 
for services as physician. Mr. Lilienthal 
was formerly a member of the firm of 
Bruhl Bros. & Co. and later of the 
United States Diamond Cutting and Pol- 
ishing Co. More recently he was in busi- 
ness at 14 John St. 

There are plans in process of forma- 
tion which, if successful, will result in the 
release of Max J. Lasar, now serving a 
sentence in the Erie county jail for smug- 
gling diamonds from Canada. The ef- 
forts of his friends may take the form of a 
petition for his pardon, and the request 
for his release will be based on his poor 
health, as referred to in The Circul.a.r- 
Weekly recently^ It is' said that he can- 
not live long under present conditions, 
and a jail physician is quoted as saying 
that symptoms of consumption and 
paresis have become apparent. Lasar 
was not in good health at the time of his 
detection, nor for some time previous 
thereto. 

The bi-monthly meeting and dinner of 
the New York Credit Men’s Association, 
held Thursday evening, at the Wool Club, 
was attended by over 150 members. There 
were delegations from Philadelphia, Balti- 
more and Boston. President Field, of 
the National Association, was expected, 
but was confined to his house by severe 
illness. Ex-President Cannon and presi- 
dent John R. Ainsley, of Boston, president 
James H. Ritter, of Philadelphia, were 
present and delivered addresses. Lig- 
nante’s Mandolin Quartette gave a novel 
effect to the dinner. A. H. Watson, presi- 
dent of the New York Association, pre- 
sided at the meeting, and after a short 
address of welcome introduced William 
A. Prendergast, secretary of the National 
Association of Credit Men, who addressed 
the Association. 

The examination into the affairs of M. 
J. Davidow, bankrupt jobber, formerly at 
510 Broadway, which has been going on 
for the past few weeks, was advanced a 
trifle last Wednesday, when attorney G. 
H. Crawford examined Bookkeeper Ep- 
stein, employed by Joseph B. Friedlander, 
a Brooklyn glass merchant, as to the de- 
tails of numerous financial transactions 
between Davidow and Friedlander. The 
Brooklyn man was in the habit of advanc- 
ing money to Davidow on endorsed notes 
and he was not able to tell all the details 
that Attorney Crawford wanted in the in- 
terests of the creditors, and the book- 
keeper was therefore called upon to sup- 
ply the miasing links. No facts were de- 
veloped beyond those reported in The 
Circul.\r-Weekly, Jan. 30. The exam- 


ination was adjourned until Monday after- 
noon, when it was again adjourned until 
this afternoon at 1 o’clock. 

Zacharias Van Blerken, a jewelry wor- 
ker, formerly at 286 W. 85th St., but now 
an inmate of the insane department of 
Bellevue Hospital, as a paranoiac, is one 
of the principal witnesses for the prosecu- 
tion in the trial of three student nurses 
who are being tried in Court of General 
Sessions on charges of pounding, kicking 
and strangling a patient named Hilliard. 
Van Blerken was a witness to the affair, 
but on account of his being an inmate in 
an insane hospital there was some ques- 
tion about admitting his testimony. He 
proved to be an apparently intelligent 
and valuable witness and cross-examina- 
tion did not disturb his story. He resist- 
ed successfully attempts of the lawyers to 
pry into his domestic affairs, except to 
say that he was “put away’’ by his wife as 
he “wasn’t very pleasant around the 
house,” but no more information on that 
point could be obtained. 

The first meeting of the creditors of Isa- 
dor Kantro, formerly a jeweler at 2096 
Third Ave., Manhattan, who filed a petition 
in bankruptcy, as recorded in The Circu- 
l,\r-Weekly, Jan. 30, was held, Thursday, 
before Referee in Bankruptcy Miller, 346 
Broadway. The principal feature was a 
lively contest between two rival la^vyers, 
each representing a would-be trustee, the 
result of which was that neither side won. 
The candidates for referee were J. H. 
Koehler, lawyer, 309 Broadway, and B. F. 
Lesser, of the Anchor Silver Plate Co., 425 
Broadway. Seven claims representing 
$1,752 voted for Mr. Koehler; eleven claims 
representing $1,477 voted for Mr. Lesser. 
The referee decided that neither had a ma- 
jority in amount or number. Objections 
were then filed by each lawyer against the 
proofs of claims filed by the other side. The 
referee took time to consider the objections 
and then decided that, as the creditors had 
failed to select a trustee, he would appoint 
one. George H. Gilman, 41 Wall St., was 
appointed. He is also the receiver appoint- 
ed by Judge Brown, of the United States 
District Court. The examination of the 
bankrupt will be begun to-morrow, at 2 
p. M., before Referee Miller. 

Napoleon Bonaparte was entertained, one 
day last week, at the Brooklyn residence of 
Francis R. Simmons, of Henry Ginnel & 
Co., 31 Maiden Lane. At least the man said 
he was France’s former ruler, but later it 
developed that he was a well known Brook- 
lyn man of musical ability whose head was 
unbalanced. Beyond the temporary commo- 
tion in the house and the alarm of Mrs. 
Simmons and daughter, no harm was done. 

A bill in the interest of auctioneers who 
have daily “bargain sales” has been intro- 


The 

M ercantile Nationa I B ank 

OF THE CITY OF NEW YORK, 

BROADWAY AND DEY STREET, 

Solicits Accounts from the Jewelry Trade. 


February 20, 1901. 


THE JEWELERS’ CIRCULAR-WEEKLY. 


39 


duced in the Legislature by Assemblyman 
James E. Smith. At present, licenses are 
granted by the City Clerk to “any person 
engaged in and carrying on the business 
and occupation of auctioneer.” The pro- 
posed law substitutes “citizen” for “any 
person” and imposes a license fee of $500, 
instead of no fee, as at present, and requires 
the auctioneer to file a bond of $5,000, in- 
stead of $2,000, as now. The City Clerk, in- 
stead of the President of the Council, is to 
hear complaints of persons who claim to 
have been defrauded and may revoke 
licenses. The auctioneers complain that 
President Guggenheimer, of the Council, 
has been too severe and revoked too many 
licenses (for good cause, he says). The 
auctioneers desire the change. 

Louis Mintz, the dealer in watch ma- 
terials, who was indicted in connection 
with the Ruprecht jewelry robbery of 
Sharpsburg, Pa., because he sold some 
of the goods found to have been stolen 
from Mr. Ruprecht, returned from Pitts- 
burgh, last week, to New York. Mr. 
Mintz called at the office of The Circu- 
lar-Weekly, Monday, and explained 
that there was an error in the dispatch 
from Pittsburgh, Feb. 9, where it Stated 
that he, Mintz, had obtained the stolen 
watches from Henry Altman, of Buffalo. 
This, Mintz says, is not so, as he never 
saw Altman. He purchased the watches 
in question from a reputable pawnbroker, 
whose name he gave to District Attorney 
Haymaker, and he believes that the Dis- 
trict Attorney learned from this pawn- 
broker that the goods were obtained by 
him from Altman. Mr. Mintz claims that 
he has already satisfied the authorities of 
his innocence in connection with the 
matter, and expects the indictment to 
be quashed. Mintz also claimed that 
Ruprecht has for some time known that 
the stolen goods had been sold by Altman 
who, it is said, will be called upon to 
show from whom he obtained them. 

A petition in involuntary bankruptcy 
was filed on Saturday against Solomon 
Seligman, dealer in jewelry, pictures, etc., 
at 10 E. 14th St., 5 E. 13th St., and 44 
W. 14th St. It is alleged that he owes 
L. R. Harsha Mfg. Co. $253; William 
Renter $104, and August F. Richter $177. 
Seligman is alleged to have committed 
an act of bankruptcy by permitting, while 
insolvent, a creditor to obtain a prefer- 
ence. The assets are claimed to be about 
$10,000 and the liabilities about $50,000. 
Williami Ford Upson has been ap- 
pointed temporary receiver of the 
assets on the application of Stern, 
Singer & Barr, representing Wil- 
liam Reuter, a creditor. The receiver’s 
bond was fixed at $10,000. Just before 
these bankruptcy proceedings Seligman 
was sued by the iNew Haven Clock Co. 
for a bill of $100. Judgment was granted 
and a city marshal seized 31 watches to 
satisfy the judgment. Legal steps were 
taken to have the judgment set aside, but 
the motion was denied Friday morning 
in the Second Municipal District Court. 

The petition of William H. Thornton, 
who filed a petition in bankruptcy last 
year, for a discharge from all his debts, 
is set down for a hearing before Judge 

(Continued on page 40b.) 



IVARMS OF SUPERIOR MAKE AND FINISH, “ THA T SELL." 


Sammies at New York Salesroorn^ 
4T UNION SQUARE. 


3no. W. Rcddall $ Co., 


Newarb:, N. J. 







TRADE-MARK. 


i853"I90i. 

J. B. & S. M. KNOWLES CO., 

Sterling Silver Table Ware. 

OFFICE AND FACTORY, 91 SABIN STREET, 
PROVIDENCE, R. I. 


Cbc mau$«r mfg, Co., 

« « Silversmitbs. « • 


Office and Factory, 14 East 15th Street, NEW YORK. 

BRANCHES: 

CHICAGO, 126 State Street; Jack Stanley, Representative, 
"2e/atc/i Our ^ds. " YORK, Gill Bldg.; Louis B. Cummings, Representative. 



DOO 

Dominick & Haff, 

sterling silver ^ TRA^B ONLY. 

860 Broadway, 

Union Square, New York. 


Vest Pocket Directory for Buyers. ^5 cents a copy. 

The Jewelers’ Circular Publishing Co. 



4U 


THE JEWELERS’ CIRCULAR-WEEKLY 


February 20, 1901. 


INDEX TO ADVERTISEHENTS. 


Abbott. Henry 

••\dler, L., & Son 

Aikin. Lambert & Co 

Aikin, Lambert Jewelry Co 

Alien, Benj., & Co 

Allen & Jonassohn 

American Waltham Watch Co 

American Watch Case Co 

Amstein Bros. & Co 

Attleboro Chain Co 

•■Vustin, John, & Son 

Avery & Brown 

Ballou, B. A., & Co 

Bank, John A., & Bro 

Barlow Mfg. Co 

Bassett Jewelry Co 

Bell Watch Co 

Benedict, M. S., Mfg. Co 

Berge, J. & H 

Bigney, S. O., & Co 

Billings, Chester, & Son 

Blair’s Fountain Pen Co 

Bonner & Co 

Bowden, J. B., & Co 

Bradley Polj-technic Institute.... 

Bryant, M. B., & Co 

Buckley, Sam’l, & Co 

Burroughs, P. J 

Chatham National Bank 

Chicago College of Optics 

Citroen, S. C., & Co 

Cleveland Store Fixture Co 

Codding & Heilborn Co 

Cohn, J. J 

Columbus Watch Co 

Cook, Edward N 

Crescent Watch Case Co 

Cross & Beguelin 

Crossman, Charles S., & Co 

Crown and Lion Watch Cases. . .. 

Day, Clark & Co 

Deitsch Eros 

De Lara, D. C 

Demarest & Eckerson 

Diamond Point Pen Co 

Dominick & Half 

Dorflinger, C., & Sons 

Dubois Watch Case Co 

Dwenger, Charles L 

Eichberg & Co 

Eisenmann Bros 

Eliassof Bros. & Co 

Fahys, Joseph, & Co 

Field & Beattie 

Foster, Theodore W., & Bro. Co 

Francis, A. E 

Frankel’s Sons, Joseph 

Freund, Henry, & Bro 

Friedlander, R., L. & M 

Garreaud & Griser 

Gattle, Ettinger & Hammel 

Gattle, H 

Goldner, S 

Goldsmith, C. P., & Co 

Goldsmith, Leo 

Goodfriend Bros 

Grinberg, Adolf J., Co 

Haack, John 

Harris & Harrington 

Haskell, H. C 

Hayward, Walter E 

Hebbard & Brother 

Hedges, William S., & Co 

Heilbronn, J., & S. Marchand.. 

Heintz Eros 

Hermann & Co 

Hirsh & Hyman 

Hooper, George E 

Howard Sterling Co 

Hraba, Louis W 

Illinois Case Co 

Illinois Watch Case Co 

Imperial Mfg. Co 

Jackson Bros 

Jacot Music Box Co 

Jewelers’ Court 


63 


. . 34 
.. 3 ? 

.. 6S 
. . 64 
.. 68 
.. 30 
.. 2 
..40d 
.. 25 
.. 67 
. ..40c 
.. 61 
,.. 64 
. . 45 

. . y 

.. 43 
...63 
.. 16 
.. 2 
..ZSO 
.. 17 
... 51 
. . 37 
.. 58 
,.. 48 
.. 42 
.. 18 
.. 43 
.. 27 
.. 67 
. ..28a 
26, 36 
...23 
,..53 
... 9 
...31 
...44 
. . 43 
...16 
...39 
...37 
...23 
...64 
...13 
...13 
...11 
...28c 
...62 
... 2 
...66 
...13 
.. .40d 
...68 
...62 
...68 
...15 
...40d 
. . .40c 
... 68 
.... 15 
... 9 
... 2 
...68 
...63 
.... 67 
.... 63 
... 8 
...30 
....28b 
...48 
...15 
.... 67 
. . .40d 
.... 64 
...48 
...51 
. .. 49 
.... 43 
...62 
.... 52 


Jurgeusen, Jules 

Kaufman, Louis, & Co 

Kahn, L. S: M., & Co 

Kent & Woodland 

Klein Bros 

Klein, F. C., & Bro 

Kleinschmidt, Howland & Co 

Knowles, Dr 

Knowles, J. B. & S. M., Co 

Kohlbusch, Herman, Sr 

Kohn, Alois, & Co 

Krementz & Co 

Lelong, L., & Bro 

Lewis, Fred. W., & Co 

Loeb, William, & Co 

Lorsch, Albert & Co 

ilacDonald, Pirie 

Malliett, Maxwell & Ross 

Manby, Sydney J 

Mann, Ignatz 

Marx & Brod 

Mathey Bros., Mathez & Co 

Mauser Mfg. Co 

Mendes Diamond Cutting Factories. 

Mercantile National Bank 

Montezuma Plantation 

Mossberg & Granville Mfg. Co 

Mount & Woodhull 

Murray, Dan I 

Myers, S. F., Co 

Nadelman, F., & Co 

Nimschke, L. W 

Noble, F. H., & Co 

Omega Watches 

Oppenheimer Bros. & Veith 

Oppenheimer, H. E., & Co 

Ostby & Barto". Co 

Pairpoint Co poralion 

Patek, Philippe & Co 

Pitzele & Baschkopf 

Ponzoni, C 

Providence Stock Co 

Racine, Lady, Watches 

Reddall, John W„ & Co 

Reinewald, Henry 

Reisner, L. C., & Co 

Revell, A. H., & Co 

Robert, E. E 

Rogers, Simeon L. & George H., Co 

Roseman, A 

Rumpp, C. F., & Sons 

Saunders, John F 

Schneider, Emil 

Schulz & Rudolph 

Search -Light Mfg. Co 

Sherwood, John W., & Co 

Simmons. R. F., Co 

Smith, Alfred H., & Co 

Spencer, E. L., & Co 

Stern Bros. & Co 

Sternau, S., & Co 

St. Louis Button Co 

Strasburger’s Son, Louis & Co 

Strauss, Ignaz, & Co 

Strauss, Jacob, & Sons 

Street, George O., & Sons 

Suffolk Watch Co 

Sussfeld, Lorsch & Co 

Towle Mfg. Co 

Trenton Watch Co 

Troescher, C. A 

Trout, Charles L., & Co 

Valfer, S., & Co 

Van Reeth, Constant 

Vatier, Ernest 

Wallace, R.. & Sons Mfg. Co 

Warner & Swasey Co 

Washburn, George W 

West Silver Co 

Wheeler, Hayden W., & Co 

White, William A., & Sons 

White, N. H., & Co 

Whiting & Davis 

Wicke & Co 

Wood, John R., & Sons 

Woodcock, W. F. A 


Special Notices. 

Rates 75C. per insertion for notices not ez- 
13 ceeding 3 lines (as words); additional words 
S cents each. Payable invariably In advance. 
Display cards on this page $3.00 per inch. 
Under the heading of SITUATIONS 
WANTRD on this page, advertisements will 
11 be inserted for One Cent a Word, each inser- 
58 tlon. Minimum charge, 35 cents. This offer 
refers to SITUATIONS WANTED ONLY. 
Payable in advance. 

29 { In all cases if answers are to be forwarded, 
68 10 eents extra to cover postage must be en- 

8 closed. 


39 

62 

2 


. 32 
. 68 
. 2 
,40d 


63 
68 
44 
15 

64 
66 

9 

62 


Sltuation0 Mantel. 


A^.^NTED — Position by young man as assistant 
' ’ watchmaker; can give references. C. Walton 
Phillips, Tiptonville, Tenn. 


. 39 
40d 
. 38 
. 50 
. 44 
. 11 
. 23 
. 66 
.28b 
. 62 
. 50 
. 27 
. 14 
. 68 
. 22 


'T' HOKOL'GHLY experienced watchmaker, jew- 
-*■ eler and salesman desires a situation. Aa- 
dress, D. C., care Jewelers’ Circular-Weekly. 


C 1TU.A.T10N WANTED as clock jobber; used 
to clock winding; speaks English, German and 
French. Address, J. M., cart Jewelers’ Circular- 
Weekly. 


ANTED— Permanent position by a first-class 
'• watchmaker; hne set of tools; best of ref- 
erences. Address, "Permanent,” care Jewelers’ 
Circular-\\ eekly. 


U'NGRA\ ER, strictly first-class, all-round; also 
jeweler and stone setter; long experience, 
best references; no bad habits. P., 46 Tennyson 
tjt., Boston, Mass. 


...64 
...16 
. .28b 
... 2 
.. 67 
.. 42 
...39 
. . 2 
.. 3 
...68 
...26 
... 5 
...13 
...52 
... 8 
...63 
. . 13 
. . . 50 
... 28 
... 6 
10, 16 
...66 
...15 
... 41 
.. . 48 


ANT ED — A place with some good watchmaker 
to finish trade; have had Ij^ years’ experi- 
ence; age, 20 years. H. F. Mallery, 40 E. Main 
St., Norwich, N. Y. 


A FIRST-CLASS WATCIIM.AKER with best 
references, over 25 years’ experience, wishes 
a position with a good concern. Address, E. A., 
care Jewelers’ Circular-Weekly. 


ANTED — Position by a youth, 19, who has 
’’ had some experience in a Maiden Lane dia- 
mond house; good recommendation. Address, 
“Cedric,” care Jewelers’ Circular-W'eekly. 


Tj'NGRAA'EK — A studious, industrious and intel- 
-C-' ligent young man, with some experience in 
jewelry repairing, wishes a permanent position. 
.Address, “Reliable,” care Jewelers’ Circular- 
Weekly. 1 , 


pXPERIENCED TRAVELING SALESMAN, 
10 years on the road, acquainted with best 
trade west and middle western States, is open for 
position to travel. Address, “Franklin,” care Jew- 
elers’ Circular- Weekly. 


IJ A lUUNG M.AN, as stock clerk and salesman 
in tile watch or jewelry trade; has been for 
20 years with Bates 8: Bacon, and can give best of 
references. Address, William Jarvis, Room 808, 11 
MaiJen Lane, New York. 


8 

68 

16 

11 

52 


A I WATCHMAKER, fine engraver, graduate 
^ optician, wants position in New; lork or 
Pennsylvania; no bad habits; gilt edge reference; 
wages moderate; all-round man. Address, C., care 
Jewelers’ Circular-Weekly. 


59 

48 

41 

42 

17 
67 
48 
64 
25 
58 
62 

18 
12 
42 

7 
19 
. 64 
. 4 
40a 


'p XPERT WATCHMAlxER, jewelry jobber, 
diamond setter, fair engraver, good all-round 
man; own tools; sober, steady, reliable; good ref- 
erence; salary, $18 to $25 per week, according to 
location. D. B. Rouse, Wilson, N. C. 


A^ ATCHMAKER, jeweler refractionist and 
plain engraver wishes to engage with some 
jeweler who can appreciate the services of a good, 
honest, sober man; tools, trial case. Address, “Op- 
tician,” Columbia Hotel, .Anderson, Ind. 


ATCHMAKER, jeweler, refractionist and 
** plain engraver wishes to engage with some 
jeweler who can appreciate the services of a good, 
honest, sober man; tools, trial case. Address, 
“Ind.,” care Jewelers’ Circular-Weekly. 


ANTED — By an experienced and well-known 
salesman, a manufacturer’s line to sell to 
department stores and jobbers; New York and' 
vicinity, including New England, if desired. Ad- 
dress, S. C, care Jewelers’ Circular-W’eekly. 


February 20, 1901. 


THE JEWELERS’ CIRCULAR-WEEKLY. 


40a 


SITUATIONS WANTED Continued. 


'C'NGRAVER AND MANAGER, 26 years’ experi- 
ence in heraldry monograms, inscriptions and 
heraldic painting; designing for jewelry and sta- 
tionery; would superintend workshop or depart- 
ment. Address, "Manager,” care Jewelers’ Circu- 
lar-Weekly. 


ANTED— By a young man, a position as 
traveling salesman for a manufacturing jew- 
eler; is acquainted with first-class retail trade on 
the line of New York Central and west of Buffalo 
and Pittsburgh. Address, W. E., care Jewelers’ 
Circular-Weekly. 


PNGRAVER AND SALESMAN, 25 years’ ex- 
perience in heraldry monograms, inscriptions 
and heraldic painting; designing- for jewelry and 
stationery; would superintend workshop or de- 
partment. Address, “Superintendent,” care Jew- 
elers’ Circular-Weekly. 


SITUATION WANTED — By a good watch- 
'D maker to finish the trade; three years’ experi- 
ence; graduate optician; excellent salesman; 
speaks the Finnish and English languages; A1 
references; salary, $15 per week. Address, J. E. 
H., care Jewelers’ Circular-Weekly. 


G ENTLEMAN, with 12 years’ experience in the 
engraving and fine stationery business, would 
like a position with a jewelry house; experience 
covers a practical knowledge